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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 16, 1992
"Rhapsody in August," which plays for one day only at the Charles, is unlikely to add much luster to the legend of the great Akira Kurosawa, but it's a surprisingly gentle, affecting movie.It's very much the movie of a man haunted by history -- or rather, a particular moment in history, 11:15 a.m., Aug. 9, 1945, when an American B-29 dropped a nuke on Nagasaki, Japan. If you ask, I'll defend the bombing of Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945, on the grounds that it probably saved a million American and Japanese lives.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has been showing a lot of love for the bicentennial of the Battle of Baltimore and the poem Francis Scott Key was inspired to write after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry. The BSO celebrated that anniversary on Sept. 13 during the nationally televised Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Pier Six, then kept the theme going for its annual gala, an all-American concert held Saturday night at Meyerhoff Hall. There was a good deal of novelty on the short program (in between dinner and dessert offered for premium gala-goers in a tent set up outside)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Marin Alsop began her tenure as Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director in 2007 with one of Gustav Mahler's symphonies and has kept his richly challenging, richly rewarding works in the prominently in the picture since. Over the years, the conductor's approach to Mahler has been, above all, precise and propulsive. So it was again Thursday night when Alsop and the BSO revisited Mahler's Symphony No. 1, which they first performed together (and recorded) in 2008. Some of us Mahler nuts crave interpretations that are exceedingly liberal with tempos and emotions, that bend a phrase here or add a pregnant pause there -- the sort of super-individualistic versions Alsop's mentor Leonard Bernstein routinely offered.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Marin Alsop began her tenure as Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director in 2007 with one of Gustav Mahler's symphonies and has kept his richly challenging, richly rewarding works in the prominently in the picture since. Over the years, the conductor's approach to Mahler has been, above all, precise and propulsive. So it was again Thursday night when Alsop and the BSO revisited Mahler's Symphony No. 1, which they first performed together (and recorded) in 2008. Some of us Mahler nuts crave interpretations that are exceedingly liberal with tempos and emotions, that bend a phrase here or add a pregnant pause there -- the sort of super-individualistic versions Alsop's mentor Leonard Bernstein routinely offered.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Another pops program devoted to George Gershwin? Why not? This weekend's Gershwin feast being presented on the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's SuperPops series will hardly be the last. Nearly 75 years after his death at the age of 39, the composer's hold on the public has never loosened. He was the epitome of Jazz Age creativity and sophistication, with an unfailing gift for melody and rhythmic vitality. "It's a challenge to choose a program," said BSO principal pops conductor Jack Everly, "because the repertoire, for all the brief time Gershwin had on this Earth, is of such high quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has been showing a lot of love for the bicentennial of the Battle of Baltimore and the poem Francis Scott Key was inspired to write after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry. The BSO celebrated that anniversary on Sept. 13 during the nationally televised Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Pier Six, then kept the theme going for its annual gala, an all-American concert held Saturday night at Meyerhoff Hall. There was a good deal of novelty on the short program (in between dinner and dessert offered for premium gala-goers in a tent set up outside)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 22, 1995
All I expect to remember about Friday's program in Meyerhoff Hall by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is the way Terrence Wilson played Rachmaninov's "Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini."To judge from this performance, Wilson, 19, is one of this country's most gifted young pianists. He has a sound that is beautiful at all dynamic levels, near-infallible fingers and the sort of personal projection that can captivate almost any audience.What was most impressive about Wilson was his lyrical gift.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 10, 1995
"Miami Rhapsody" is the best movie Woody Allen never made.Tart, loose, fast, piquant and vivid, it's the story of a young woman teetering on the brink of wedlock, whose image of the institution of marriage has been seriously compromised by the adultery-o-rama transpiring all about her. Mama has her boyfriend, papa has his mistress, little sister has her boyfriend, brother has his mistress. There's a good deal of sex in the movie, none of it conjugal.The rhapsody of the title, then, is the game of perpetual musical beds.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 26, 2008
Saturday evening's concert by the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra may have been billed as a Spring Rhapsody, but if anyone came to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts expecting pastel hues and light, frilly fare, they got disabused of those notions in a hurry. With works by Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakoff, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Richard Strauss on the bill, it was a night of big sounds and grand gestures. The program began with Rimsky's "Russian Easter Overture," a festive depiction of Russian Orthodoxy's Easter liturgy, complete with incense, icons, glowing candles, bearded priests, modal chants, fluttering angels and church bells chiming to the glory of Mother Russia's earthy, exotic celebration of the Resurrection.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | January 20, 1994
A Silver Spring computer analyst accepted a plea agreement yesterday that could mean he'll spend the rest of his life in prison for raping two western Howard County women in 1992.William Kirk Evans, 52, agreed to plead guilty to two counts of first-degree rape in Howard Circuit Court. He withdrew an initial plea of not criminally responsible by reason of insanity.Evans was accused of breaking into the homes of the two women, forcing them to leave with him at gunpoint and taking them to his Rhapsody Lane home, where he forced them to have intercourse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Another pops program devoted to George Gershwin? Why not? This weekend's Gershwin feast being presented on the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's SuperPops series will hardly be the last. Nearly 75 years after his death at the age of 39, the composer's hold on the public has never loosened. He was the epitome of Jazz Age creativity and sophistication, with an unfailing gift for melody and rhythmic vitality. "It's a challenge to choose a program," said BSO principal pops conductor Jack Everly, "because the repertoire, for all the brief time Gershwin had on this Earth, is of such high quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 14, 2009
A big trend in classical music over the past several decades is historical authenticity, the attempt to re-create how works sounded when they were new. This usually involves repertoire from distant centuries, but pieces from relatively recent times can come in for the authentic treatment, too. A case in point is the latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program, devoted entirely to George Gershwin. This presentation, conducted by Marin Alsop and showcasing the superb French pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, does raise an interesting question about the whole historic reclamation business.
NEWS
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
"He has such a flourish about him, doesn't he?" That's Marin Alsop, speaking about Jean-Yves Thibaudet, the French pianist with the scintillant technique, refined musicality and really great clothes. Thibaudet is the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's soloist for two weeks, starting with an all-Gershwin feast that is being recorded for Decca, his longtime label. He'll play "Rhapsody in Blue," Concerto in F and the "I Got Rhythm" Variations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | February 12, 2009
The past year has been something of a whirlwind for Sara Bareilles, but last Sunday was especially dizzying. The unassuming pop singer-songwriter was on the red carpet at Los Angeles' Staples Center at the 51st annual Grammy Awards. She was up for two. Her smash, the catchy "Love Song," garnered nods for song of the year and best female pop vocal performance. "I couldn't believe I was there," Bareilles says, still sounding awe-struck. "It was one of the best days of my life. It was such a special experience.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | May 8, 2008
The Preakness added two new starters yesterday when connections for Recapturetheglory and Racecar Rhapsody told Pimlico racing officials they are headed for Baltimore. Recapturetheglory, owned by Ronnie Lamarque and Louis Roussel, will be the only Kentucky Derby competitor to take on Derby winner Big Brown in the May 17 race. It is only the third time in the past 59 years a Derby winner has gotten off so lightly. "We know that we belong," Lamarque said. "Big Brown is a bear, but we're not going to [the Preakness]
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 26, 2008
Saturday evening's concert by the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra may have been billed as a Spring Rhapsody, but if anyone came to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts expecting pastel hues and light, frilly fare, they got disabused of those notions in a hurry. With works by Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakoff, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Richard Strauss on the bill, it was a night of big sounds and grand gestures. The program began with Rimsky's "Russian Easter Overture," a festive depiction of Russian Orthodoxy's Easter liturgy, complete with incense, icons, glowing candles, bearded priests, modal chants, fluttering angels and church bells chiming to the glory of Mother Russia's earthy, exotic celebration of the Resurrection.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | August 22, 2007
In what could be one of the most formidable challenges to Apple Inc.'s iTunes, the owner of MTV is teaming up with Verizon Wireless and RealNetworks Inc. on a new online music service. The service will combine MTV's floundering URGE digital music business with RealNetworks' Rhapsody music subscription business, through which users can access all the music they want online for $12.99 a month and up. In a conference call with reporters yesterday, RealNetworks chief executive Rob Glaser said the revamped Rhapsody is a major step toward creating what he calls a one-of-a-kind "jukebox in the sky" for subscribers using computers, cell phones or other portable devices.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 15, 2001
Every person is supposed to have at least one story to tell: his or her own. But that doesn't mean we all have the skill to do our stories justice. The writer-director of An American Rhapsody, Eva Gardos, does have an amazing tale. In 1951, her wealthy, cultured mother and father fled Budapest with her older sister. Because Eva was an infant and unfit to make the journey, they left her behind. Until age 6, she lived with a peasant couple who loved her as if she were their child. When the Red Cross helped reunite her with her parents in America, she found herself wondering if her real home was with them or with her guardians back in Hungary.
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