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EXPLORE
February 16, 2012
Editor: I do attend church, I know I need to; I am not anti religion. I am aware that front men promote wants and causes they hope will produce big bucks for themselves and their sponsors. Religious promotions are some of America's biggest recipients of money. Religion sells well on TV and in other public arenas. Some religious promoters become rich and some do go broke. Here in Harford County prayer is banned from public schools during the school week, however some of Harford's Public Schools become Churches on the weekend.
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NEWS
February 5, 2014
Thanks to reporter Jon Meoli for his balanced article, "No Accord on Loch Raven Elementary" in the Jan. 22 issue of the Towson Times. We are writing because although we believe the story fairly reported Superintendent Dallas Dance's position, the article fell short in several ways from the perspective of the four community members representing the Loch Raven Village and Knettishall communities. The two primary concerns articulated by Dr. Dance in the article are that our children will not be able attend the new school and our community programs will be displaced.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
A man who lives on the eastern edge of historic Doughoregan Manor in Ellicott City has filed a circuit court appeal of Howard County rezoning to allow development of hundreds of new homes - a key part of a plan that allows some development in order to preserve the rest of the property. The Carroll family, descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrolton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, wants to develop part of the 892-acre property to raise money for restoration and maintenance of the estate that once comprised more than 10,000 acres, while keeping it in family hands.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
At least two members of the Annapolis City Council are considering putting an end to late-night meetings, after a public hearing this week stretched until 3 a.m. The City Council chambers were packed with more than 100 people on Thursday night who wanted to weigh in on a new master plan for City Dock and a rezoning proposal for properties along one side of the dock. The meeting started shortly after 7 p.m. on Thursday, and the first public hearing on the master plan concluded in the 11 o'clock hour.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
A coalition of groups concerned with redevelopment of downtown Annapolis is forming to fight a City Dock rezoning plan being promoted by Annapolis Mayor Josh Cohen. Members of the Coalition to Save Annapolis say they will formally launch their effort Tuesday. The coalition is composed of groups including the Ward One Residents Association, the Annapolis Business Association, the Historic Annapolis Foundation the United States Yacht Shows, the Fleet Reserve Club, and individual homeowners and business owners.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | June 11, 2013
Some north Baltimore wine and liquor stores may have found a way around a proposed Baltimore City zoning change that could eventually ban them from the residential neighborhoods in which they are located. Several stores in the Hampden and Charles Village areas are seeking rezoning from residential to commercial, with the support of community leaders and their City Council representatives. Among the businesses seeking rezoning to C1 commercial status are JT's Market & Deli in Medfield, the Charles Village Schnapp Shop, the Wine Underground in Hoes Heights, and Roland Park Wines & Liquor in the Rolden neighborhood.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
The Baltimore County Planning Board voted unanimously Thursday to allow the former Solo Cup property in Owings Mills to be redeveloped as an office and retail hub called Foundry Row. The 385,000 square foot development is expected to be anchored by a Wegmans grocery store, a fitness chain, and a sporting goods store. There will also be restaurants, more retail stores and 40,000 square feet of office space. The re-development of the 52-acre property will cost $140 million, according to a Thursday statement from project developer Greenberg Gibbons.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
The Baltimore County planning board on Thursday approved the rezoning of a 52-acre site in Owings Mills to allow for a large-scale development project that will include a Wegmans grocery store, according to a news release from the developer. Foundry Row, a 385,000-square-feet mixed-use project to be built on the former Solo Cup property along Reisterstown Road, will also include a fitness center, a sporting goods store and shops, restaurants and offices. The project, estimated to cost $140 million, is being developed by Greenberg Gibbons and Vanguard Equities.
NEWS
October 21, 1990
Two petitioners are seeking approval from the Carroll Planning and Zoning Commission to rezone land in the Finksburg area near Route 140 and the Baltimore County line.James and Carla Uhler, of Reisterstown, Baltimore County, have requested that about five acres designated conservation be rezoned to industrial. The property is on the north side of Route 140, just northeast of the intersection with Route 91.A similar request submitted by the Uhlers was rejected in 1983 by the planning commission, said planner Steve Horn at Tuesday's monthly meeting.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Sherry Joe and Mark Guidera and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writers | January 18, 1995
Two Howard County-based partnerships are seeking to rezone land near Jessup so they can build up to 264 homes in the heart of the county's industrial belt.The project would be constructed on a site that Arnold Sagner, a managing partner of one of the groups, argued last summer might be rendered useless for development because it was so close to a proposed waste transfer station. At the time, he said the partnership was planning to build warehouse and distribution buildings on the site.Blue Stream Limited Partnership and Elk Partnership now seek to have almost 34 acres of a 79-acre site rezoned as residential property, county records show.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
A coalition of groups concerned with redevelopment of downtown Annapolis is forming to fight a City Dock rezoning plan being promoted by Annapolis Mayor Josh Cohen. Members of the Coalition to Save Annapolis say they will formally launch their effort Tuesday. The coalition is composed of groups including the Ward One Residents Association, the Annapolis Business Association, the Historic Annapolis Foundation the United States Yacht Shows, the Fleet Reserve Club, and individual homeowners and business owners.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | June 11, 2013
Some north Baltimore wine and liquor stores may have found a way around a proposed Baltimore City zoning change that could eventually ban them from the residential neighborhoods in which they are located. Several stores in the Hampden and Charles Village areas are seeking rezoning from residential to commercial, with the support of community leaders and their City Council representatives. Among the businesses seeking rezoning to C1 commercial status are JT's Market & Deli in Medfield, the Charles Village Schnapp Shop, the Wine Underground in Hoes Heights, and Roland Park Wines & Liquor in the Rolden neighborhood.
EXPLORE
April 16, 2013
The overview of the Plan Howard 2030 General Plan states: "The purpose is to articulate policies and actions to move us to further sustainability while enhancing the quality of life. " The question is: What is Howard County's true vision? I ask because as comprehensive rezoning has taken place to date, it appears the vision is to merely grow, grow, and develop, regardless of inadequate infrastructure. Refer to Section 8 of Plan Howard 2030 — "Public Facilities and Services" as infrastructure comprises not only roads and schools, but other categories such as transportation, police, fire, health services, water and sewer, solid waste, etc. The Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance should be expanded to include all these categories to achieve accountability.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
It is unusual for me to side with developers, but your article about the Chestnut Ridge property being re-zoned to accommodate nine houses instead of the more lucrative zoning that currently exists is just wrong ("Developer sues Balto. Co. Council," Dec. 24). I understand the issue with the Greenspring Valley Association, but the proper time to change the zoning is during the Comprehensive Zoning Map. This allows residents time to air their views and get a fair hearing. Residents cannot be expected to go to meetings every time a councilperson wants to change zoning.
NEWS
October 19, 2012
In her commentary, "Don't sign it" (Oct. 18), Ruth Goldstein notes that the Baltimore County zoning process is a game. She points out that "Mr. [Howard] Brown and Mr. [David] Cordish got outplayed by other developers. " She is absolutely right. What she doesn't pause to realize is that both sides are playing a game where the Baltimore County Council is the stand-in referee. As a citizen of Baltimore County, District 2, I do not want rezoning to be a game. It should be a process. Jujitsu is an ancient Japanese "art" or "technique" that represents the manipulating of the opponent's force against himself rather than confronting it with one's own force.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
Many in Baltimore County and elsewhere are no doubt bewildered by all the fuss that was raised in recent months over the redevelopment of the former Solo Cup plant in Owings Mills into an upscale development featuring a Wegmans supermarket. If you're going to build a shopping center (and built-up Reisterstown Road is no stranger to them) isn't this what you'd want? But alas, the proposal proved as contentious and fraught with political intrigue as any county land use decision in recent memory.
NEWS
September 8, 1991
Roger D. HallMarriottsvilleLast Tuesday, the Howard County Planning Board meeting scheduled to hear GTW's proposal for the rezoning of 682 acres was postponed due to a legal technicality. Several local television stations and hundreds of citizens, who oppose the rezoning, attended.After the planning board advised the audience of the decision to postpone the meeting, I watched and listened to a reporter interview Leonard R. Goldstein, an attorney representing GTW. One of Goldstein's responses mentioned, "The emotional people" who were protesting the proposal "shouldlisten on a rational basis."
NEWS
July 30, 2006
Developers were mighty pleased that Maryland's Court of Appeals refused last week to get involved in their squabble with a citizens group over the quickie rezoning of 38 parcels of land. But the developers' successful bid to keep the issue off the November ballot only fans the flames of anti-development fervor in the county and feeds the suspicion that rezoning profiteers have far too much influence over county officials. County Council members who crafted the so-called Comp Lite process, through which properties were permitted more lucrative uses outside of the traditional 10-year comprehensive remapping, should acknowledge their mistake and vow it will not become a precedent.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
Small purple wildflowers dot sections of northern Baltimore County's rolling roads, where the only sounds are the chirps of birds and insects. Rows of corn and soybeans grow along other stretches. Now, many residents fear the land's environmental resources and natural beauty - its farms, open fields and greenery - are being threatened by dozens of requests that would allow more development on large rural tracts. On Tuesday, the County Council is scheduled to make crucial decisions on hundreds of acres in a district stretching from Lutherville to the Pennsylvania border, as part of a countywide rezoning process that occurs every four years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
I was fooled by the summer calm of old Lutherville, the Victorian village in Baltimore County that hides behind York Road, the Beltway and Interstate 83. On a cloudy morning, Lutherville's timeless homes seemed to be enjoying a July holiday, with abundant rose of Sharon bushes blooming near the rain-encouraged weeds. But something else was sprouting on the lawns of old Lutherville: a crop of signs devoted to a neighborhood zoning issue. It is a tricky issue. The longtime owners of the College Manor assisted-living complex want a zoning change that would enable them to build a new facility, move the residents into it, then renovate the old complex, portions of which are decades old. But the Lutherville residents say that once a zoning change is enacted, it stays on the books and remains permanent should the property change hands.
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