Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReykjavik
IN THE NEWS

Reykjavik

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood | March 1, 2009
If there's one place the global financial crisis has hit harder than the United States, it's Iceland. But one industry that's thriving in Iceland is tourism, as visitors rush to scoop up bargains in what was once one of the most expensive countries in the world. Lonely Planet and other travel publications have listed Iceland as one of the top destinations this year. Icelandair used to fly direct from BWI Marshall Airport to Reykjavik. That service has been discontinued, but you can hop a flight out of New York or Boston and be in the world's northernmost capital in less than six hours.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood | March 1, 2009
If there's one place the global financial crisis has hit harder than the United States, it's Iceland. But one industry that's thriving in Iceland is tourism, as visitors rush to scoop up bargains in what was once one of the most expensive countries in the world. Lonely Planet and other travel publications have listed Iceland as one of the top destinations this year. Icelandair used to fly direct from BWI Marshall Airport to Reykjavik. That service has been discontinued, but you can hop a flight out of New York or Boston and be in the world's northernmost capital in less than six hours.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | June 3, 2007
Will we need visas for a two-day trip to Reykjavik, Iceland? Also, can you suggest package tours and local sights? No visa is required; you can visit Iceland for up to 90 days without one. Reykjavik has plenty to see if you explore on your own: parks, museums, shopping, dining -- and its compact size makes it easy to navigate on foot. Don't miss a chance to visit a thermal pool or the Blue Lagoon, a mineral-rich hot water lagoon and spa not far from the airport. Or to dine at the Pearl (Perlan)
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | June 3, 2007
Will we need visas for a two-day trip to Reykjavik, Iceland? Also, can you suggest package tours and local sights? No visa is required; you can visit Iceland for up to 90 days without one. Reykjavik has plenty to see if you explore on your own: parks, museums, shopping, dining -- and its compact size makes it easy to navigate on foot. Don't miss a chance to visit a thermal pool or the Blue Lagoon, a mineral-rich hot water lagoon and spa not far from the airport. Or to dine at the Pearl (Perlan)
FEATURES
By Caroline Spencer and Caroline Spencer,Contributing Writer | January 10, 1993
I was searching for the perfect winter vacation -- one that would offer natural beauty as well as a bustling city center. And I found it, surprisingly, in Iceland.Certainly, planning a winter trip to Iceland was a concern. But it's a popular myth that Iceland, the second largest island in Europe, is a frozen country. Despite its northerly location, the Gulf Stream actually keeps temperatures quite moderate.Iceland, which lies close to the Arctic Circle, is situated approximately halfway between Moscow and New York in the Atlantic Ocean and is only a two-hour flight from the United Kingdom.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | February 29, 2004
A Memorable Place Dancing until 4 a.m. in Reykjavik By Colleen Cusick SPECIAL TO THE SUN My daughter and I took a trip to Iceland last fall. There had been other trips as parent and child, but this was a new phase of our lives together. On the flight to Iceland, my daughter turned 23 and decided that we should celebrate by going out clubbing in Reykjavik, a city known for its nightlife. My daughter informed me that only tourists go out to the clubs before midnight. So to avoid being identified as tourists, we went to Reykjavik's City Central area about 12:30 a.m. We soon found ourselves in a popular club, where it was crowded and the music pulsed.
TRAVEL
By STEPHEN HENDERSON and STEPHEN HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2002
We will now sing a march-like tune, about the thrill of the hunt," the choir conductor announces. He lifts a baton to his singers, 80 men, the average age (I'm guessing) being 55, and they burst forth at shocking volume. Out to dinner in Reykjavik, I've stumbled into a black-tie gala. Though far from tuxedoed myself, I'm given a warm welcome and informed that this choir, the evening's entertainment, sings almost exclusively of "horses, women and alcohol." A plate is set before me containing baklowa (salted cod)
NEWS
By William Ecenbarger | April 1, 2005
I HAND THE agent my brottfarerspjald, step on board Icelandair Flight 642. Just before takeoff, the flight attendant stands before us clasping a seat-belt buckle and droning through the oryggisbunadur um bord. Some five hours later, we begin our descent into Reykjavik. At the airport, I get my passport stamped at vagabraeftirlit, make a quick refresher stop in the snyrtingar, exchange dollars for kronurs at the gjaldeyrir and pick up tourist information at the upplysingapjonustu fyrir feroafolk.
NEWS
June 23, 2002
UNDER Communist Party rule, the Chinese people have made friends all over the world, or so the relentlessly employed party slogan goes. The people of China, indeed, have many true friends -- certainly more than their government, which is all too happy to rely on foreigners kowtowing before its considerable weight. The world recently got a look at how that can play out shamefully in -- of all places -- Iceland, where Chinese leader Jiang Zemin visited last weekend. Tiny Iceland, a wealthy, tranquil place, boasts an admirable history of democracy and free speech, dating back to the founding of the world's oldest parliament in 930. But these traditions were put on hold in the days leading to Mr. Jiang's visit.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2002
REYKJAVIK, Iceland -- In the year 874, Viking crews from western Norway started to drop in on Ireland, capture an allotment of young Celtic women and sail off northwest to a remote island beyond the reach of retribution. Eleven centuries later, a direct descendant of those Icelandic pirates and their slave wives, Dr. Kari Stefansson, is starting to extract a tremendous prize, made possible by Iceland's tiny, isolated population and its obsessive interest in genealogy: a catalog of the deviant genes that cause the most common human diseases.
NEWS
By William Ecenbarger | April 1, 2005
I HAND THE agent my brottfarerspjald, step on board Icelandair Flight 642. Just before takeoff, the flight attendant stands before us clasping a seat-belt buckle and droning through the oryggisbunadur um bord. Some five hours later, we begin our descent into Reykjavik. At the airport, I get my passport stamped at vagabraeftirlit, make a quick refresher stop in the snyrtingar, exchange dollars for kronurs at the gjaldeyrir and pick up tourist information at the upplysingapjonustu fyrir feroafolk.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | February 29, 2004
A Memorable Place Dancing until 4 a.m. in Reykjavik By Colleen Cusick SPECIAL TO THE SUN My daughter and I took a trip to Iceland last fall. There had been other trips as parent and child, but this was a new phase of our lives together. On the flight to Iceland, my daughter turned 23 and decided that we should celebrate by going out clubbing in Reykjavik, a city known for its nightlife. My daughter informed me that only tourists go out to the clubs before midnight. So to avoid being identified as tourists, we went to Reykjavik's City Central area about 12:30 a.m. We soon found ourselves in a popular club, where it was crowded and the music pulsed.
NEWS
June 23, 2002
UNDER Communist Party rule, the Chinese people have made friends all over the world, or so the relentlessly employed party slogan goes. The people of China, indeed, have many true friends -- certainly more than their government, which is all too happy to rely on foreigners kowtowing before its considerable weight. The world recently got a look at how that can play out shamefully in -- of all places -- Iceland, where Chinese leader Jiang Zemin visited last weekend. Tiny Iceland, a wealthy, tranquil place, boasts an admirable history of democracy and free speech, dating back to the founding of the world's oldest parliament in 930. But these traditions were put on hold in the days leading to Mr. Jiang's visit.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2002
REYKJAVIK, Iceland -- In the year 874, Viking crews from western Norway started to drop in on Ireland, capture an allotment of young Celtic women and sail off northwest to a remote island beyond the reach of retribution. Eleven centuries later, a direct descendant of those Icelandic pirates and their slave wives, Dr. Kari Stefansson, is starting to extract a tremendous prize, made possible by Iceland's tiny, isolated population and its obsessive interest in genealogy: a catalog of the deviant genes that cause the most common human diseases.
TRAVEL
By STEPHEN HENDERSON and STEPHEN HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2002
We will now sing a march-like tune, about the thrill of the hunt," the choir conductor announces. He lifts a baton to his singers, 80 men, the average age (I'm guessing) being 55, and they burst forth at shocking volume. Out to dinner in Reykjavik, I've stumbled into a black-tie gala. Though far from tuxedoed myself, I'm given a warm welcome and informed that this choir, the evening's entertainment, sings almost exclusively of "horses, women and alcohol." A plate is set before me containing baklowa (salted cod)
FEATURES
By Caroline Spencer and Caroline Spencer,Contributing Writer | January 10, 1993
I was searching for the perfect winter vacation -- one that would offer natural beauty as well as a bustling city center. And I found it, surprisingly, in Iceland.Certainly, planning a winter trip to Iceland was a concern. But it's a popular myth that Iceland, the second largest island in Europe, is a frozen country. Despite its northerly location, the Gulf Stream actually keeps temperatures quite moderate.Iceland, which lies close to the Arctic Circle, is situated approximately halfway between Moscow and New York in the Atlantic Ocean and is only a two-hour flight from the United Kingdom.
NEWS
May 15, 2005
THE QUESTION: HOW MANY PASSENGERS USE BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT? An average of more than 55,500 passengers traveled through BWI each day in 2004, reaching a total of 20.3 million for the year, according to the airport's statistics. Nearly half traveled on Southwest Airlines, which holds 47 percent of the market share of the 27 passenger airlines operating there. And where are passengers going? South. The top international destinations include Bermuda, Mexico, Dominican Republic, the Bahamas and Jamaica.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 24, 2000
AKUREYRI, Iceland - It is nearly midnight at the Akureyri Golf Club - the northernmost 18-hole course on the planet - but you'd never know it from the activity. Small throngs of diehard golfers, from a group of six alcohol-fueled Reykjavik businessmen to electrical contractor Jim Boudreau from Worcester, Mass., are intently whacking little white orbs deep into the nighttime sky. Local wildlife is acting a bit strangely, too. Birds that should be sleeping scratch in the dirt, and shaggy-maned Icelandic horses gallop in nearby fields.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.