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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
NEW YORK'S hottest off-Broadway ticket, "Forbidden Broadway," dares to lampoon the stars and plots of musical theater's sacred cows.In the Big Apple's longest-running revue (now in its 10th year and currently playing at Theatre East), some of the biggest hits -- "The Phantom of the Opera," "Miss Saigon," "The Secret Garden," "Will Rogers Follies," "Grand Hotel" -- are broadly parodied by the show's creator, Gerald Alessandrini, a professional actor and singer.No one is spared his sharp satirical pen."
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By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | October 10, 2013
Howard Community College's Arts Collective will host a musical revue by former HCC student Jason Downs and other alums this weekend. The show, "Why Am I Not Famous?" is a comical exploration of fame and celebrity by Downs, who in his 30-year show-business career has performed on Saturday Night Live, acted in movies next to Whoopi Goldberg and Neil Patrick Harris, attended the Oscars and snagged a record deal. There will only be two performances of the revue, on Oct. 11 and 12 at 8 p.m. in HCC's Horowitze Center Studio Theatre.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | December 29, 1994
"A Grand Night for Singing" is Rodgers and Hammerstein great and small.It's great because it's a revue of music by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, probably the most important songwriting team in the history of American musical theater. And it's small because it has a cast of only five, and, in addition to such Rodgers and Hammerstein standards as "Some Enchanted Evening" and "Oh, What a Beautiful Morning," it includes such little-known songs as "The Gentleman Is a Dope," from the unsuccessful musical "Allegro," and the revue's title song, which comes from Rodgers and Hammerstein's only original movie, "State Fair."
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By Katie V. Jones, Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 12, 2013
As a song from of "Bye Bye Birdie" filled the auditorium at Severn School's Chesapeake campus on Wednesday, two voices were called in to assist. Drama director Harrison Smith and counselor Brian Shatt willingly added their voices to the all-female cast. "It's an odd year," acknowledged Sharon Stevens-Cimaglia, vice president of Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre and executive director of the camp. "Typically we have five to 10 boys. " The Annapolis company's Performing Arts Camp for teens has performed a musical revue since its beginnings 14 years ago. While many theater camps focus on producing a "book" show - a show that follows a story and features several leads and a chorus - a revue gives the staff an opportunity to tailor the show to the campers' talents.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | January 30, 1992
The songs vary from love songs to ballads to novelty numbers; their tone ranges from comic to satiric, bittersweet to sad. Chances are, you've never heard a single one before, and yet Fells Point Corner Theatre's production of "Closer Than Ever" will warm your heart.In fact, it's no exaggeration to say that "Closer Than Ever" comes closer than ever to demonstrating the high caliber of Baltimore's community theaters -- and of Fells Point Corner in particular.The tuneful, sophisticated musical revue consists of two dozen loosely linked songs by composer David Shire and lyricist Richard Maltby Jr., creators of "Baby" and "Starting Here, Starting Now" (Maltby's other credits include "Miss Saigon" and the short-lived "Nick & Nora")
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 6, 1991
Just before intermission in the joyous Yiddish-English revue, "Those Were the Days," a puff of smoke wafts in from the wings, and actress Eleanor Reissa announces that she has just seen her first train. The train symbolizes the immigration of European Jews to America. As she waves goodbye, Ms. Reissa says, "We go, but we will always remember."Remembering is at the heart of this five-person revue, conceived and compiled by Zalmen Mlotek and Moishe Rosenfeld, and now playing a two-week run at Center Stage.
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By Lou Cedrone | September 10, 1990
Washington's Arena Stage begins the fall season with ''Closer Than Ever,'' an original, entertaining musical revue that was first done off-Broadway.David Shire did the music and Richard Maltby Jr., the lyrics for all these very bright, very clever songs. There are 23 in all, and they range in topic. What is important to know, however, is that they cover important aspects of maturity as we know it today.Once in a while, the lyrics touch on youth, but most often they cover other topics, the despair of loving the wrong person, doors that continually open to new lifetime experiences, the man who wants to drop his girlfriend and tells her he wants to be her friend, and the man who has bought the marriage deal and wonders if he has done the right thing.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | January 25, 2007
As enjoyable as an evening of music by a favorite songwriter can be, it's even more fun to discover the talents of someone new. To be honest, David Friedman isn't a newcomer. His songs have been recorded by Barry Manilow and Diana Ross, and I am a fan of the late cabaret singer Nancy LaMott's recordings of his music. So, I had some familiarity with Friedman before the Vagabond Players' engaging, current production of his musical revue, Listen to My Heart. Judging from the two dozen songs in this revue, certain themes recur in Friedman's work - the notion that opposites attract; the importance of getting the most out of life; and a stalwart belief that it is possible to find a soulmate.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 22, 1991
Appearances to the contrary, this sure ain't Broadway:actress in a familiar curly red wig and a little red dress is belting out "Tomorrow," but she's chain-smoking and singing, "I'm 40 years old, tomorrow!"Then there's Cameron Mackintosh -- producer of "Miss Saigon," "The Phantom of the Opera," "Les Miserables" and "Cats" -- hawking souvenirs and proclaiming, "It costs $50 to see my show, and it costs $50 more to leave."No, this is not the real Broadway, it's the mock, or, more precisely, the spoof -- the long-running satirical revue "Forbidden Broadway," coming to the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Saturday as part of Lifesongs 1991, the fourth annual benefit concert to support the Health Education Resource Organization (HERO)
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 12, 1996
If you're "Searchin' " for an escape from the holiday blahs, then "Stay a While" at the Mechanic Theatre and see "Smokey Joe's Cafe" 'cause, baby, "That Is Rock & Roll" -- and not just "Yakety Yak."These are only a few of the 40 songs by rock-and-roll pioneers Jerry Leiber (a Baltimore native) and Mike Stoller in this hit Broadway revue, whose nine-person touring cast is as polished as the New York original.Leiber and Stoller revues have been tried before. There were two in London in the 1980s and one in Seattle a few years ago. Nothing clicked, however, until "Smokey Joe's Cafe."
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By Katie V. Jones | April 17, 2012
Last September was the first time since its beginnings in 1974 that the community theater group September Song went "dark. " It was a heart-breaking decision for Joan Eichhorn, producer, but a necessary one. Financially-strapped after its sponsoring organization decided to part ways, September Song held a musical revue as a fundraiser, instead of a full-fledged production. "It is so grossly expensive to put on musical theater," Eichhorn said. "We had no choice but to go dark.
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January 8, 2012
Thanksgiving Day 2011 dawned bright and beautiful as over 60 volunteers made their way to help serve the Loverde Family Community Fund's Thanksgiving Day feast for the homeless. Around 1 p.m., the first of 160 guests from the Westside Homeless Shelter, Mosaic Community Services, and Spring Grove Hospital Center were greeted and shown to their tables. For the fifth year in a row, a delicious home-style Thanksgiving dinner would be servedScittino's, in Catonsville Junction, had expertly prepared the tasty, loosen-your-belt holiday feast.
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By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
With the first beat of the opening number from "Jukebox," the audience roars its approval, as it does for virtually everything that unfolds onstage when Marriotts Ridge High School puts on its zany music and dance revue every October. At least that's what's happened each of the last six years that the original, student-produced extravaganza has been performed, ever since the Marriottsville school opened its doors in 2005. The unconditional love that explodes from the crowd during the opening number flows freely all evening long, organizers say, making "Jukebox" one of the school's most highly anticipated shows.
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By Katie V. Jones | September 3, 2011
This time of year, cast members and organizers of the September Song community theater group are usually bustling about, getting ready for the opening of the troupe's annual musical theater production. This year, that familiar cast of characters is bustling again. But this time, they're working on a one-night only fundraising performance aimed at keeping the lights from being dimmed on Carroll County's own touch of Broadway. "There's No Business Like Show Business," a musical revue highlighting songs from past September Song productions and popular Broadway shows, will be presented on Saturday, Sept.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 31, 2009
It would be impossible, not to mention foolhardy, to choose one contender for the title of America's greatest songwriter. But if such a designation absolutely had to be made, a lot of money would be riding on Irving Berlin. There is such a startling amount of quality in the quantity of Berlin's songs (more than 1,200), and a remarkable consistency in terms of communicative power.
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By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | June 6, 2008
A tour van - packed with costumes for an all-male revue- that was stolen last weekend from outside an Annapolis music venue has been recovered in Washington, police said. But the performers were still trying to figure out late yesterday whether their props had been found, due to lack of resources at the Annapolis Police Department. The van, a rental, was parked outside Rams Head OnStage on West Street after two sold-out performances by the Las Vegas-based "Thunder From Down Under" touring show last Friday night.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 27, 2000
Near the end of the musical revue "It Ain't Nothin' But the Blues," two songs are sung back to back that cogently demonstrate the range of the blues. The first is a self-described "funked up" version of "Goodnight, Irene," performed with high-spirited one-upsmanship by "Mississippi" Charles Bevel and Sean McCourt. It's immediately followed by the plaintive Billie Holiday classic "Strange Fruit," sung by Gretha Boston in tones as mournful as a dirge and as impassioned as a cry of pain. The show strives to present the broad spectrum of the blues' emotions and styles, as well as an abbreviated history of the genre.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 28, 1998
Most dinner theaters don't make a point of creating original material, but F. Scott Black's Towson Dinner Theatre is doing just that with a dance revue titled simply, "Dancing." Created by local director/choreographer Todd Pearthree, the show opens Thursday."What we've done is taken pre-recorded tracks and put dances to them," explained Pearthree, who said he's wanted to do a show like this for about a decade.Pearthree is known for directing stage musicals, and the revue will include reconceived versions of songs from such shows as "Ain't Misbehavin' " and "Chicago."
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By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2008
Friday night began like others on the Thunder From Down Under tour, with six beefcake Aussies gyrating and flexing in front of two sold-out shows' worth of screaming women. But it ended with the performers' scouring the streets of Annapolis in search of a stolen tour van - and thousands of dollars worth of breakaway pants, thongs and cowboy costumes. Bummer, mate. "It's just very, very disconcerting that this is happening. Our whole philosophy is about having fun, female empowerment, ladies coming in and leaving their troubles at the door," said Adam Steck, a co-owner of SPI Entertainment, which produces the show.
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December 9, 2007
Bon Secours Spiritual Center, 1525 Marriottsville Road, Marriottsville, will offer a "Brunch with Santa" from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. On the menus are French toast sticks, scrambled eggs, hash browns, oatmeal, bacon and sausage, and a salad bar with fresh fruit. The cost is $10.95; $8.95 for children, and includes a picture with Santa. Donations of canned goods are requested; those who bring a donation will receive a $1 discount. Information or reservations: 410-442-1320. Church to present Christmas musical Chapelgate Presbyterian Church, 2600 Marriottsville Road, will present A Christmas Carol: The Musical at 8 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday, and 5 p.m. Dec. 16. Tickets are $10; $8 for seniors and students.
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