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Revolving Door

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NEWS
October 2, 2013
During the last decade, the percentage of people released from Maryland's prisons who re-offend within three years has dropped by more than 11 points - and by 3 points in just the last year. Considering the cost to society of the revolving door prison has become for too many in this country, that's a laudable achievement. Yet the fact that more than two in five who are released from prison will still get arrested or violate parole within three years shows just how much more progress remains to be made.
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NEWS
August 25, 2014
Let me see if I understand this: Marquel Gaffney, 15, murdered Albert Smith, 56, in 2007, was charged as an adult, but pleaded guilty of second-degree murder and was sentenced in juvenile court ( "Baltimore man, 21, charged in second murder in five years," Aug. 5). In 2012, he was convicted of drug crimes and last year he was charged with unauthorized removal of property. In March of this year he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to four years in prison with all but six months suspended.
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NEWS
By John J. Boronow and Steven S. Sharfstein | December 29, 2013
Treatment refusal occurs in medical/surgical settings across the world every day: a child with leukemia resisting a painful bone-marrow biopsy, an elderly man with Alzheimer's fighting his medication, a woman awakening from a coma and demanding release. And in most instances, "society" - as represented by the family, the health care providers and our legal institutions - has well-established, ethical, effective and efficient mechanisms for enabling the treatment to proceed. But that same society frequently fails people with severe mental illness who also have a related affliction known as "anosognosia" - essentially the inability to recognize one's own illness, however obvious it may be to everyone else.
NEWS
January 1, 2014
As a parent of a child suffering for 14 years from a devastating severe mental illness - one that includes zero awareness and utter denial that the illness exists - I am bewildered why Maryland has failed to create an assisted outpatient treatment (community based) program ( "Close the mental health revolving door," Dec. 29). The pendulum has swung so sharply so as to protect personal rights that we have failed to help those who need it the most. Should we not require persons be given the vaccinations that are part of life's medical treatment protocol?
NEWS
December 28, 1994
Those revolving doors at the State House are spinning so rapidly they're creating winds that could be hazardous to the public's health. In one revolution, government officials are walking out the door and then returning as lobbyists.It's not a healthy trend. Speaker Pro Tem Gary Alexander retired so he could earn lucrative fees bending the ears of former colleagues. John Stierhoff, top aide to the Senate president, jumped to a lobbying firm with close ties to top Annapolis leaders. Former Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell joined the throng of influence-peddlers recently.
NEWS
December 14, 1992
Candidate Bill Clinton attacked "the revolving door in Washington." He vowed to do something about the way special interests hired executive branch officials for their contacts and insider knowledge. Often these ex-officials came from the private sector and returned to it, where they were paid to subordinate the public interest to the private interest.Like previous administrations, the Bush administration imposed some rules regarding what ex-officials could do and when they could do it. But now President-elect Clinton has gone a good way beyond existing rules.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | March 5, 1993
The Maryland House of Delegates reversed itself yesterday and approved by the narrowest possible margin legislation that would modify a "revolving door" prohibition affecting seven regulators at the Public Service Commission.Under the bill, if the PSC's general counsel or any of its six hearing examiners left to take private sector jobs, they would be allowed to appear before the commission after a waiting period of one year, instead of the currently required two years. The PSC sets rates for electricity, gas, water, sewer, telephone and other services and utilities.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | December 19, 1994
When John Stierhoff retired this month as top aide to the president of the Maryland Senate, legislators gave him a standing ovation. Two hours later, he left the State House with a double Rolodex the size of a toolbox -- filled with contacts he developed during his career in government.Then he walked two blocks to his new law firm, Dukes Evans Rozner Brown & Stierhoff, to begin his job as a lobbyist. Among his duties: trying to influence many of the legislators who had just given him such a rousing send-off.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | November 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Last year, while running for president, Bill Clinton vowed to stop the capital's "revolving door" in which ex-government officials cash in on their connections for cushy jobs as lobbyists for private business interests.Today, however, after less than a year in office, White House deputy chief of staff Roy M. Neel is leaving the White House and weighing offers for executive-level jobs in the telecommunications industry, including one that pays $500,000 to head a telephone industry trade association that lobbies Congress.
SPORTS
By Ron Green and Ron Green,Charlotte Observer | March 2, 1993
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- North Carolina's Tar Heels finally made it back to the White House of college basketball, No. 1 in the Associated Press poll, this week, but there are no plans at this point to re-do the place in baby blue.And, read my lips, don't put in a putting green for Dean Smith just yet.People are in and out of that place so fast this season, they should put in a revolving door. Indiana, which had lost only to Kansas and Kentucky -- both former No. 1s -- fell from the top spot this week because it lost on the road in overtime to Ohio State after missing a free throw that would have won it in regulation time.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
During the last decade, the percentage of people released from Maryland's prisons who re-offend within three years has dropped by more than 11 points - and by 3 points in just the last year. Considering the cost to society of the revolving door prison has become for too many in this country, that's a laudable achievement. Yet the fact that more than two in five who are released from prison will still get arrested or violate parole within three years shows just how much more progress remains to be made.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2012
Right now Rick Abbruzzese works at a desk a few feet from Gov. Martin O'Malley's office in the State House. In two weeks, he'll report a few blocks away to the Annapolis law firm Rifkin, Livingston, Levitan and Silver LLC, where he will likely lobby his soon-to-be former boss. Ditto for Joseph C. Bryce, a State House staffer for nearly two decades and O'Malley's influential chief legislative officer for the past six years. Last month he announced his departure and has moved into a new office at Manis, Canning and Associates where he'll cajole, pressure and maneuver on behalf of corporate clients.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
A top manager at the State Highway Administration apparently solicited funds from contractors for a golf tournament in which he had a financial stake — and then expedited awards to some of the same companies. Another senior official retired from the agency and 12 days later took a job with a construction management firm that benefited from a $16 million procurement he helped arrange while he was still with the highway administration. These are among the findings of a scathing report released Friday by the state Office of Legislative Audits that identifies multiple potential violations of ethics laws and the agency's own rules.
NEWS
January 5, 2011
Myron Matthews was 18 at the time of his first conviction for illegal gun possession in 1997. A judge sentenced the Baltimore man to three years in prison but suspended all but three months. As a result, Mr. Matthews was back on the street within weeks. A year later he was re-arrested on gun charges and again sentenced to three years. But this time he served only nine months, with the rest suspended. And over the next decade Mr. Matthews would be in and out of jail for a half dozen more robbery and gun crimes, each time serving only a fraction of his sentence.
NEWS
December 2, 2010
A story over the weekend by The Sun's Justin Fenton had an all-too-familiar ring to it: Police spot a man on a busy downtown street walking in a manner suggesting he may be carrying a concealed weapon. When a patrolman approaches to investigate, the man pulls a gun and fires, seriously wounding the officer. After back-up units track down and arrest the alleged shooter, it turns out he's a felon out on parole with a lengthy record of prior gun-related convictions. The case of 29-year-old Franklin Gross Sr., the suspect in Saturday's shooting, is only the most recent example of a pattern that has frustrated police and prosecutors for years: violent, repeat offenders who are handed substantial sentences at trial yet serve only a fraction of their time.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
Defendant after shackled defendant rises before the judge, who in the space of mere minutes determines that this one will remain in jail to await trial, or that one will get sprung on bail. Despite the variety of charges that landed them here — assault with hot soup or a shard of glass, stalking by Facebook, the garden-variety disorderly conducts and destructions of property — they soon become a nearly undistinguishable line of sleepy, mostly silent men and women whose cases are not so much heard as processed.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | July 27, 2008
Orioles manager Dave Trembley said yesterday that he hasn't made a decision on left-hander Brian Burres' starting spot, but he believes changes need to be made with the rotation. "I'm not trying to be threatening or anything like that," he said. "I love all these guys. They're great. But if it ain't working, we've got to try to do something to fix it. I'm not saying that's going to happen tomorrow or next week or whenever. But I think it definitely has to be considered. That's fair. I don't think anybody would argue with that."
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