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By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | January 20, 2013
What better time than a Crawley dinner with the Archbishop of York for Branson to get all revolutionary and escape to Downton? Loved the transition here. Robert is talking to the archbishop about Catholics and admits that he's anti-Catholic. "There always seems to be something of Johnny Foreigner about the Catholics. " And bam - next shot is Sybil running through the rain, making a frantic, cryptic call to Edith: "I have no time to talk, but tell them I'm all right. I'm out of the flat.
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NEWS
September 14, 2014
Whether "Baltimore - Birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner" is destined to become the city's official motto, as the City Council recently endorsed, is less important than a troubling bit of information that arose during the council's debate over the matter. Polls suggest only about one in five people living in Baltimore know of the city's link to the national anthem and even fewer are aware of it outside this state. This weekend's festivities may change that - although probably modestly so given that the PBS' Great Performances series doesn't exactly have the ratings of a "reality" TV show, let alone a major sporting event.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2012
Even Revolutionary War action figures need spring training to get their spit-and-polish act together. The men of the Fourth Legionary Corps got back into character for the long re-enacting season with a weekend at Fort Frederick just south of Hagerstown. They didn't shave, fended off the evening chill by gathering around the barracks fireplace and practiced the tactics of 18th century warfare. "It's clearing away the cobwebs and seeing that we have everything we need before we go out," said Mike Nigh of Annapolis, who has been a corps member since 2007.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Three Vietnam War veterans stood on the ramparts of Fort McHenry, gazed onto the Patapsco where British warships launched hundreds of rockets and mortar shells almost 200 years ago, and imagined the scene that unfolded during the Battle of Baltimore. "I know rain was pouring down, and with all the shooting and shelling for more than 24 hours, they had no idea if they were going to survive," said Chuck Gallinger, 69, of Oshkosh, Wis., who served in Southeast Asia in 1966. Gallinger and his friends - in town for a reunion of their unit, the 709th Maintenance Battalion of the 9th Infantry - had stopped for a taste of the Star-Spangled Spectacular, Baltimore's bicentennial celebration of its defense against the British and the writing of the national anthem.
TRAVEL
By [Mike Farrell] | September 23, 2007
This weekend, 1,000 Revolutionary War reenactors from across the country will arrive at Mount Vernon, Va., to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Continental Line, an educational organization that re-creates Army units. Musket and artillery demonstrations, fife and drum performances and a variety of living-history activities will be featured throughout the encampment. The encampment runs 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Mount Vernon Estate and Gardens, 3200 Mount Vernon Memorial Highway, Mount Vernon.
NEWS
May 5, 1995
The William Winchester Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution will mark the grave of a Revolutionary War soldier tomorrow.First Lt. John Fowler, who fought in the Revolutionary War, is buried at St. John Catholic Cemetery, behind the Westminster Library, 50 E. Main St. At 10 a.m., the group will place a DAR plaque on his tombstone."That's one purpose of the DAR -- to find these Revolutionary War soldiers," said Janet Colburn, a William Winchester Chapter member.
NEWS
By Jason Begay and Jason Begay,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 2002
BROOKLYN, N.Y. - Carefully examining a dozen glazed clay shards, Jennifer Borishansky, a third-year archaeology student, saw her duty as the sorting out of a 200-year-old Revolutionary War-era jigsaw puzzle. The pieces were washed of the mud and vegetation that had clung to them through two centuries underground. Some of the pieces were about the size of Borishansky's palm, others just crumbs of what she thought was a crock pot, used to store food or water. "It probably wasn't used for cooking, but it was used for food for sure," she said.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2005
When the American Colonies were being pummeled by British forces during the Revolutionary War, a pugnacious Scotsman in charge of a Continental Navy ship took a daring risk: He took the fight to the British. In battle after battle off the European continent, John Paul Jones scored stunning victories for the fledgling American Navy against larger, more powerful British ships. His famous rallying cry - "I have not yet begun to fight!" - is said to have been yelled during a pitched battle off the English coast in 1779 with a supposedly superior British frigate, which Jones ultimately captured.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
Several weeks ago, I had written about vice presidential candidates who hailed from Maryland. Along with intrepid Sun researcher Paul McCardell, who has a deep and abiding affection and thorough working knowledge of Maryland history, we came up with two names and an almost was. Henry Gassaway Davis was the oldest vice presidential candidate when he ran with Democratic nominee Alton B. Parker in 1904. He was 80 at the time. Forty years ago, Spiro T. Agnew, former Baltimore County executive and Maryland governor, was nominated to be Richard M. Nixon's running mate at the Republican Convention at the Miami Beach Convention Center in Florida.
NEWS
By new york times news service | May 8, 1997
EASTON, N.Y. -- In October 1777, cannon and musket fire echoed across the Hudson River here as American troops, who were dug in on bluffs above the western shore, stopped the British advance toward Albany, 23 miles downstream. The battle of Saratoga was a turning point in the Revolutionary War.The once-bloodied fields and woodlands have been enshrined since 1938 as the Saratoga National Historical Park. But there has been no protection for the pastoral view enjoyed by park visitors, who gaze east from the hilltop gun emplacements.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris and Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Amid celebrations marking the 200th anniversary of "The Star-Spangled Banner," leaders in Maryland have hammered home a point: If it weren't for Baltimore, American history might well have turned out very differently. "For many Americans, the War of 1812 was a minor event, but not for us," Gov. Martin O'Malley said Thursday. He spoke at the March of the Defenders, which commemorated the 6-mile trek of the Maryland militia to defend the city on Sept. 14, 1814. "We call the War of 1812 the Second War of Independence, and for good reason," O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
With his fife's high-pitched notes soaring over the enthusiastic throngs that gather each year at historic sites to celebrate Memorial Day, Dave Embrey is an attention-getter. Clad in historically accurate attire, the longtime Savage resident performs on one of his walnut or rosewood fifes, depending on which war he is helping to commemorate. The notes of the piccolo-like instrument enhance the 15 or so ceremonies he participates in each year. Welcome to the world of re-enacting with "Fifer Dave," whose musical talent and passion for living history have made him a regular at the National Memorial Day Parade in the nation's capital and at other locales from Mount Vernon to Fort McHenry.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Today they endure climbing children and have bicycles chained to them, but the cannons that flank Patterson Park's Pagoda were used in wars as much as 350 years ago, park officials have found. A cannon expert surveyed the seven historic weapons last fall and will soon undertake their restoration after finding they aren't just reproductions, as many had thought in the century since they were installed to commemorate the War of 1812 centennial. Some were likely used in the Battle of Baltimore, on land or sea, and in the Revolutionary War - or earlier.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
Restricting guns from law-abiding citizens (exclusive of the mentally ill) is an assault on our rights as Americans that cannot be tolerated. Historically, the very first shots of the Revolutionary War were fired over the British trying to confiscate weapons from the colonists. Subsequent to the Revolutionary War, implicit in the debate between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists was the assumption that that the federal government should not have any authority at all to disarm the citizenry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | January 20, 2013
What better time than a Crawley dinner with the Archbishop of York for Branson to get all revolutionary and escape to Downton? Loved the transition here. Robert is talking to the archbishop about Catholics and admits that he's anti-Catholic. "There always seems to be something of Johnny Foreigner about the Catholics. " And bam - next shot is Sybil running through the rain, making a frantic, cryptic call to Edith: "I have no time to talk, but tell them I'm all right. I'm out of the flat.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
The numerous descendants of Henry Lightner may have inherited the mettle he displayed in battle when they set out to trace their roots, find his unmarked grave and after nearly 130 years honor him with a proper monument. Many had heard the tale of the "Drummer Boy of Fort McHenry," the 16-year-old who joined the militia and played his drum during the march to Fort McHenry, where the decisive Battle of Baltimore occurred during the War of 1812. The drummer, who stood out in a red coat, carried commanders' orders to the embattled troops.
NEWS
By Jere Downs and Jere Downs,Knight Ridder/Tribune | January 2, 2000
VALLEY FORGE, Pa. -- Once a remote Revolutionary War encampment, Valley Forge National Historical Park is being overrun by the modern threats of traffic congestion and suburban sprawl, officials warn. "Valley Forge is very much threatened," said Marie Rust, the National Park Service regional director. "It's a national and cultural resource that's being degraded by traffic and pollution from development." Close to the King of Prussia mall, the Route 202 corridor and the booming Chester County suburbs, the park has traffic troubles that have become overwhelming, Rust said, since most commuters head toward Philadelphia.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
Forty U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen arrived at the St. John's College campus under an autumn sky on a mission: to honor French soldiers who fought side by side with Americans during the Revolutionary War. Like everything else in the 42nd annual Wreath Laying Ceremony at the National Monument for French Soldiers and Sailors on Thursday, midshipman Brian Chadwick's speech hit a trans-Atlantic note - delivered in both French and English. Addressing the gathering of about 200 people by the banks of College Creek, the final resting place of an unknown number of French soldiers, Chadwick acknowledged the nation's debt to the young Marquis de Lafayette and thousands of French troops who served under General George Washington's command in the early 1780s.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2012
Even Revolutionary War action figures need spring training to get their spit-and-polish act together. The men of the Fourth Legionary Corps got back into character for the long re-enacting season with a weekend at Fort Frederick just south of Hagerstown. They didn't shave, fended off the evening chill by gathering around the barracks fireplace and practiced the tactics of 18th century warfare. "It's clearing away the cobwebs and seeing that we have everything we need before we go out," said Mike Nigh of Annapolis, who has been a corps member since 2007.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
He was a famed seaman — a prodigy who won a congressional medal at 18, fought in three wars and ended up commanding the 44-gun USS Constitution, "Old Ironsides," as it tracked slave ships off the coast of Africa. The reputation of Commodore Isaac Mayo was unassailable, and so were his credentials as a local gentleman as he settled in on the family plantation in southern Anne Arundel at age 67. But if Mayo expected to spend his latter days in comfort, he misread the volatility of his times.
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