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NEWS
August 8, 2011
Kudos to Dan Rodricks for his column ( "For tea party, a question: What now?" Aug 4). What aren't we getting? What exactly does the tea party want us peons (never has the term proved more apt!) to understand? Are they really out to promote a class-based society, fast-reverting to Dickensian proportions? We're jobless and homeless, nest eggs (those lucky enough to have them) vanishing; food and gas prices soar while wallets flatten. Vanishing too is the middle class, and we're back to the bad old days of the obscenely rich getting obscenely richer and the once-hopeful working class back down to the pits.
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NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | July 3, 2014
The celebration of America's birthday rarely includes references to Thomas Paine, the author of the pre-Revolutionary War pamphlet "Common Sense. " But Paine's role in the break with Great Britain was important, and his life has a way of reminding us that our nation has had enormous tolerance for wayward individuals - a sobering contrast to the consistent propriety exemplified by history-makers such as George Washington or John Adams. Paine was born in 1737 in Thetford, a village 70 miles northeast of London, the son of a staymaker or corsetmaker.
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NEWS
April 5, 2013
I grew up in the 1950s in a sports-deprived area of southeast Georgia. Except for a not-so-close and generally unnoticed Georgia Florida league baseball farm team, there was no major league baseball, football or basketball. Sports meant cow pasture baseball, share the ball, bat and glove and not much of a distraction. The 1960s came with some participation in the voting rights and integration struggles, along with the new arrival of professional baseball, an interesting but not an embedded passion.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on the impact of climate change on the economy, I agree that resolving the issue of climate change would not be an economic failure but rather a success ( "The economic climate ," June 24). Aside from the fact that if climate change is ignored the situation of the economy will become an issue of infinitely less importance than the condition of our planet, exploring solutions to the problem will open many opportunities to improve the economy. At current rates of consumption, there is an estimated 50 years of oil left in Earth's crust.
NEWS
January 2, 1999
Pub Date: 1/02/99
NEWS
By Louise Branson | December 10, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Two months after the popular uprising that forced dictator Slobodan Milosevic out of power in Serbia, a mood of uncertainty prevails. Posters put up by the student group Otpor (Resistance) capture the unease. Underneath a picture of a giant bulldozer, symbol of the revolution, is a warning to new Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica and his entourage: "We are still watching." Will these new leaders, is the message's subtext, prove corrupt like the Milosevic regime? Or incompetent?
NEWS
November 17, 1994
They fought it in Chestertown. They fought it in Ellicott City. They fought it in Owings Mills.Those locales won't conjure images of Bunker Hill and Yorktown, but their battles against Wal-Mart are very much part of a revolution. The late Sam Walton, founder of the Arkansas-based chain, was for years noted as the country's wealthiest man. Yet for many Americans, particularly in the populous Northeast, his was an invisible empire.The company made its mark mostly in rural backwaters, where it bled dry the mom-and-pops on Main Street.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | May 4, 1996
THE OTHER DAY I took my car to the shop for an oil change and routine check-up. A 1983 model, the old girl requires the type of regular attention that only a good mechanic can provide. That's not me.I miss not being able to drive to work when I leave her at the shop. It's not that I don't like to ride the bus -- even with the exorbitant MTA fares. I do, occasionally.But alone in my car I can play my Hendrix tape of ''Manic Depression'' as loudly as I want (''I know what I want/But I just don't know/How to go about getting it'')
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | January 9, 1995
CHINA WAKES, BY NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF AND SHERYL WUDUNN. Times Books. 501 pages. $25.IF A GOOD BOOK about a foreign land gives you facts, color and a feeling for that country, "China Wakes" is a very good book.Mixing anecdotes, trends, statistics and theories, the husband-and-wife authors, who recently ended a reporting tour for the New York Times in China, write alternating chapters touching just about every aspect of Chinese life and policy.What they see is not as simple as simple Communist repression.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 23, 2004
The Cuban Revolution that brought Fidel Castro to power in 1959 was a watershed event whose repercussions were felt throughout the Americas. Photojournalist Burt Glinn was celebrating New Year's Eve at a party in New York when, on an inspired hunch, he hopped a plane for Havana and landed early the next day just as Castro's forces were triumphantly marching across the island toward the capital. For the next nine days, Glinn photographed the rebels' progress and the ecstatic crowds that greeted them everywhere along their march.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
John Danko got his Baltimore company's first 3-D printer four years ago, and he said it's given him a front-row seat for a manufacturing revolution. In an office across the street from the foundry where Danko Arlington's molten metal flows, he prints out the industrial patterns he said he could no longer find skilled workers to do by hand. Employees designing products on computers use the technology to spit out prototypes more quickly. Some see in this the potential for a change as substantial as the Industrial Revolution - a different way of making things that could kick-start tiny operations, disrupt entire industries and literally transform the landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
For many years, critics didn't take French composer Francis Poulenc or his music very seriously, even after his first opera was premiered in 1947. Then again, that entry into the operatic realm wasn't likely to win over skeptics. The title is "The Breasts of Tiresias," and the surreal plot includes a man who fathers 40,000 children in one day. But Poulenc was the real deal, a composer with a distinctive flair for lyrical melody and an ear for exquisite harmony to support it. Those gifts were widely recognized and acclaimed when he created his second work for the stage, "Dialogues of the Carmelites," first heard in 1957.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
At 2 a.m. one morning in March 2010, photographer David Hobby was wandering, awestruck, around a gilded palace in Southwest Asia as the royal guest of a monarch. "I thought to myself, 'Holy crap! I'm in the sultan's palace in Oman, and no one's even around,'" recalled the Ellicott City resident, who had been invited to the small Arab state to speak about Strobist.com, his photography website and blog. "I've been pinching myself for the last six years," said the 48-year-old married father of two teens.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Egyptian army tanks are rumbling through the streets of Cairo in an ominous show of force that leaves little doubt that the country's fledgling experiment in democracy has been seriously disrupted. The whereabouts of President Mohamed Morsi, the country's first democratically elected leader, are unknown, and the generals directing what the president's advisors have condemned as a "military coup" have yet to fully explain their intentions. The political situation is still very much in flux.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 17, 2013
"Why are there no libertarian countries?" In a much-discussed essay for Salon magazine, Michael Lind asks: "If libertarians are correct in claiming that they understand how best to organize a modern society, how is it that not a single country in the world in the early twenty-first century is organized along libertarian lines?" Such is the philosophical poverty of liberalism today that this stands as a profound question. Definitions vary, but broadly speaking, libertarianism is the idea that people should be as free as possible from state coercion so long as they don't harm anyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 12, 2013
Cuban Revolution has come to Baltimore's Middle East neighborhood. Just a few blocks away from the Johns Hopkins Hospital , the Middle East area has seldom officered any reason for outsiders to wander in. That is changing. The neighborhood is being developed as a mixed-use life science campus. The anchor tenant is the Science & Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, but the 80-acre area will include other research facilities along with new housing, parking and a six-acre central park.
BUSINESS
By Pat Baldwin and Pat Baldwin,Dallas Morning News | November 24, 1991
DALLAS -- Jobs are no longer forever. Streets are not safe. Earth is in ecological danger. Food may be deadly. And advertising bombards consumers with ever-so-mixed messages.But not to worry.Faith Popcorn, trend analyst and the so-called "Nostradamus of marketing," is predicting a "socioquake" -- a grass-roots shake-up of society prompted by more changes in the next 10 years than in the last 90.Signs of the consumer-driven revolution are already apparent, Ms. Popcorn says. As consumers change what they buy -- and how they buy it -- they change who they are. Businesses that intend to survive had better be quick to get in on the act.Since 1974, Ms. Popcorn's New York market-research company, BrainReserve, has been predicting what Americans will buy, where they'll work, how they'll live and what they'll think.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
A Cuban Revolution has come to East Baltimore. The city's Middle East neighborhood is just a few blocks away from Johns Hopkins Hospital, but there was seldom any reason for outsiders to wander in. That has changed. Amid protests from some longtime residents and others, most homeowners in the area were relocated and their houses — along with many that were abandoned and dilapidated — were torn down. Now Middle East is being developed as a mixed-use life science campus. The anchor tenant is the Science & Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, but the 80-acre area will include other research facilities along with new housing, parking and a six-acre central park.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
I grew up in the 1950s in a sports-deprived area of southeast Georgia. Except for a not-so-close and generally unnoticed Georgia Florida league baseball farm team, there was no major league baseball, football or basketball. Sports meant cow pasture baseball, share the ball, bat and glove and not much of a distraction. The 1960s came with some participation in the voting rights and integration struggles, along with the new arrival of professional baseball, an interesting but not an embedded passion.
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