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NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
RISING SUN - Cecil County commissioners have rejected a controversial legislative proposal that would have halted preliminary approval for new housing units in more than half the county for a period of six months. By a vote of 3-2 the commissioners killed a bill that its sponsor said would have stopped the paperwork leading up to housing construction while a newly appointed 11-member comprehensive review committee examined the county's long-term growth plan. William C. Manlove, the bill's author, said it was designed to prevent a flurry of new home construction plans from being filed with the county while the review committee did its work.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 28, 2013
A Baltimore City-mandated citizens' advisory committee that few people knew existed until this month scrambled to meet Saturday, ahead of a Monday deadline to make recommendations to the Planning Department about a proposed shopping center with a Walmart store in Remington. Although 15 area residents attended the meeting at Corky's Grill near the development site, only two were committee members, so the five-member committee lacked a quorum and can only issue "a report of those present," said John Viles, who chaired the meeting.
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NEWS
January 27, 1991
County school officials are looking for community residents to serveon a review committee that will spend the remainder of the 1990-1991and 1991-1992 school years evaluating the special education program.Applicants must live or work in Howard County, be available for committee meetings and be committed to objectivity through the process.Application forms are available from the Department of Education assessment office at 313-6701.The applications must be postmarkedno later than Feb. 1.Applications are to be submitted to PhyllisH.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
A professors' group at Coppin State University said Monday that it shared a review committee's improvement goals for the traditionally black college, but questioned why the reviewers didn't address certain funding issues nor a perceived lack of oversight by university system leaders. Last month, a committee appointed by the university system's Board of Regents recommended significant changes to the struggling institution, including a greater selectivity in admissions. The recommendations are meant to reverse Coppin's poor graduation rate - the worst in the state at 15 percent - and enrollment shortfall, among other problems.
NEWS
October 3, 2006
TODAY Landfill meeting -- Eastern Sanitary Landfill will hold its bimonthly meeting at 10 a.m. at 6257 Days Cove Road, White Marsh, to discuss operations of the landfill. 410-887-3188. Development review -- The Department of Permits and Development Management's Development Review Committee will meet at 1:30 p.m. in Room 123, County Office Building, 111 W. Chesapeake Ave., Towson. The request is for a development refinement to construct a hotel at 8477 Cordon Way, White Marsh. 410-887-3353.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2001
Crofton may soon learn the fate of a lone front-yard fence among its look-alike homes that has flared tempers and set off a federal fair-housing investigation in the community. Crofton Civic Association is meeting tonight and is expected to hear what action its Covenant Review Committee recommends for the fence. The wooden picket fence ringing Beate Kanamine's yard has riled residents of The Willows, the cul-de-sac community where Kanamine lives with her husband and 5-year-old son, David Christopher.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
Concerned their elected officials will give in to a neighbor who has made a federal case over her right to have a front-yard fence, some Crofton residents are railing against any kind of compromise - even if that means costly litigation. Neighbors hoped for an inkling of the Crofton Civic Association's plans and timetable regarding the matter at Monday's CCA meeting. Word of a deal that would keep the wooden fence up for two years had rippled through The Willows subdivision, where Beate Kanamine built the fence - in violation of neighborhood covenants - in August.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 24, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Certain confidential hospital personnel records may be subject to public scrutiny when they become part of a lawsuit, the Court of Appeals ruled yesterday.The decision, in a case involving The Baltimore Sun and University Hospital, could open to the public the evaluation of doctors by peer review committees, in certain cases.It is only the second time Maryland's highest court has interpreted the state peer review statute, said Mary Craig, a lawyer for the newspapers.The ruling stemmed from an attempt by Kelly Gilbert, who covers U.S. District Court for The Evening Sun, to review the case file in a suit in which Dr. H. Harlan Stone, former professor of surgery at University Hospital, claimed that his rights were violated when he was fired.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | January 4, 1991
A singer and songwriter whose compositions have been banned from thecounty schools' curriculum could make educators face the music in court.Barry Louis Polisar, who had performed in county schools for 15 years, says he may sue the school system because no one told him why his work is no longer acceptable.The ban, he says, has also cost him work in other school systems.Polisar pens and performs ditties such as "Don't Stick Your Finger Up Your Nose," "Never Cook Your Sister in a Frying Pan" and "I Can Do Anything I Want to When Grandma and Grandpa Come."
EXPLORE
May 30, 2012
Mayor Craig Moe has appointed three residents to the city's Census and Ward Boundary Review Ad Hoc Committee, which held its first meeting May 29. Former City Council member G. Rick Wilson was appointed to represent Ward 1, Rhonda Whitley was appointed to represent Ward 2 and Kimberly Elliott will be the at-large representative on the committee. Census and Ward Boundary Committee members will review the census figures for the city of Laurel and review the boundaries of Laurel's two wards.
NEWS
August 24, 2008
At Howard High School, a musical beginning Students at Howard High School should expect to be greeted at 7 a.m. tomorrow, when school opens, by 125 staff members playing percussion instruments and forming drum rhythm circles. The school's leadership invited John Murray, founder of Fun Drum Rhythm Circles, to lead its staff through leadership building exercises. The drum circles are intended to create a sense of teamwork, community and belonging. Tutoring firm expands Peer2Peer, a company founded by a Montgomery County high school student, has expanded its services to Howard County.
NEWS
July 8, 2007
There are openings in the two top spots at the Smithsonian Institution. Pay is good, in the low to middle six figures. The prestige of running the nation's premium museum system is hard to match. Replacements for former Smithsonian Secretary Lawrence M. Small and his deputy, Sheila P. Burke, who also served as CEO, won't get the sweet deals - unlimited vacation, lucrative service on outside boards, no oversight - that resulted in the scandal that forced their resignations. Still, the jobs shouldn't be so hard to fill that restoring the Smithsonian management to full strength takes up to a year, as the institution's Board of Regents told a Senate committee last week.
NEWS
April 12, 2007
The decision by Harford County's schools superintendent and its Board of Education to remove a controversial book, The Chocolate War, from the curriculum of a ninth-grade course is regrettable, to say the least. What started out as an admirable effort to teach young people about real-life issues has become an unfortunate lesson in cowardice. To help with the often-difficult transition from middle school to high school, Harford school administrators designed a course for ninth-graders called Living in a Contemporary World.
NEWS
February 6, 2007
TODAY Planning Board -- The county Planning Board will meet at 5:30 p.m. in Room 407 of the New Courts Building, 401 Bosley Ave., Towson, for a capital improvement program work session. 410- 887-2450. THURSDAY Community meeting -- Greater Parkville Community Council will meet at 7 p.m. at the Parkville Recreation and Senior Center, 8601 Harford Road. County Councilmen Joseph Bartenfelder, Vincent J. Gardina and T. Bryan McIntire will be guest speakers. 410-668-2580. Police meeting -- Baltimore County Police Precinct No. 03 (Franklin)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | December 10, 2006
Plans for a 91-unit retirement community near Bel Air have been revised into a 172-unit subdivision with townhouses and condominiums, sparking outcry from nearby residents concerned about the effect on roads and schools. The property is owned by the estate of Henry H. Boyer and is under contract for sale to the Towson-based Nottingham Properties Inc. The sale is contingent on county approval of the project, said Doug Cann, the company's vice president. Although the new proposal includes more homes, it is consistent with the county's master plan and in compliance with the county's requirements, county officials say. The impending opening of two schools and the expected effects of redistricting led the company to plan a higher-density community, he said.
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