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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
One year after city officials pledged to reinvigorate Baltimore's police civilian review board, members say their work feels insignificant and they are still seeking more authority. The Police Department recently said it would ask the volunteer citizen panel to look at police-involved shootings and other major use-of-force cases. The reviews, however, would occur after the cases have been closed — a role that seems perfunctory, members say. "We want to know: What are we really going to do?"
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NEWS
July 2, 2014
Increasingly concerned about incidents involving the Baltimore police, I read the article concerning the review board and its lack of authority ( "Civilian police review board floundering," June 30). I would not want the police to think nobody cares or is watching or think that its business as usual when officers go looking for trouble and get no real discipline. Two men in Northwood say they have been stopped and beaten by the same two cops and now have joined in a civil suit.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that she has asked her senior team to explore giving Baltimore's police civilian review board a "more impactful" role in the police disciplinary process. "In order for us to be consistent across the board when we're talking about civic engagement, we have to make sure the ways in which we touch the public are impactful," she said. "I don't have answers on what, if any changes there will be. That's definitely something I am looking at. " The Police Department recently asked the civilian review board to review major "use of force" cases such as officer-involved shootings.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that she has asked her senior team to explore giving Baltimore's police civilian review board a "more impactful" role in the police disciplinary process. "In order for us to be consistent across the board when we're talking about civic engagement, we have to make sure the ways in which we touch the public are impactful," she said. "I don't have answers on what, if any changes there will be. That's definitely something I am looking at. " The Police Department recently asked the civilian review board to review major "use of force" cases such as officer-involved shootings.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Baltimore's police civilian review board has concerns that a new effort to garner input from the board is not meaningful, an official told a City Council committee on Wednesday night.  After years of neglect, the department has been making strides to make the board more relevant, and recently announced that it would refer major use of force investigations, such as police-involved shootings and in-custody deaths, to the board after they were completed....
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Five city residents have been nominated to take seats on Baltimore's police civilian review board, filling out a volunteer panel that has been described as irrelevant and ineffective. For years, the civilian review board has had four vacancies out of nine positions, indicative of the erosion of interest in the once-controversial board by city officials and police. Baltimore's board sometimes gets misconduct complaints from police after the cases have already been closed, and the panel's recommendations - which are not made public - are very rarely followed.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Six city residents were sworn-in Monday to take seats on Baltimore's police civilian review board, part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's effort to remake a panel described as irrelevant and ineffective. The civilian board, which is tasked with reviewing police misconduct complaints, has sat half-vacant for years, and the panel's recommendations are rarely followed, according to reports in The Sun. The mayor also appointed a new chairwoman to lead her Anti-Animal Abuse Advisory Commission.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
A Northwest Baltimore woman was nominated to the city's police civilian review board on Monday night, the first move in filling as much as eight positions on the beleaguered nine-member board.  The nomination of Sunny Luisa Cooper for the unpaid position represents the second time Cooper's name has been submitted to the board, which investigates citizen complaints of abusive language and excessive force by police. She was originally put forward along with two others by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in 2011, and confirmed by the council, but the swearing-in never took place.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
State legislators who helped create Baltimore's police Civilian Review Board said yesterday that they intend to amend the legislation to shorten the term of the board's first members from three years to six months. The change would counter City Council's approval Monday of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's seven nominations to the review board, created this year to monitor police misconduct.The state legislators who helped get the measure passed in Annapolis complained that Schmoke failed to open the appointment process to all residents and that three of his nominees were recommended by the police.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | March 14, 1999
THE MESS OF blond curls that Ken Holtz wore under his sailor's hat when he was a gunner's mate on an aircraft carrier more than 40 years ago is gone now. In its place are white hairs on a pate going slowly bald.But shake his hand and you'll learn the hard way that the 67-year-old Holtz still has the grip of the tough, beat-walking cop who patrolled East Baltimore for 14 years. He sits behind a desk in the living room of his Severna Park home and gazes at the framed newspaper article on his wall.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
A year after Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake pledged to reinvigorate the city's civilian police review board, panel members say nothing much has changed. That's hardly surprising. The board still lacks the power to investigate citizens' complaints of police misconduct in a timely fashion, and its recommendations are routinely ignored by the department. A panel so toothless that even its own members publicly wonder whether their efforts are a complete waste of time obviously isn't accomplishing its mission as a mediator of police-community relations.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
One year after city officials pledged to reinvigorate Baltimore's police civilian review board, members say their work feels insignificant and they are still seeking more authority. The Police Department recently said it would ask the volunteer citizen panel to look at police-involved shootings and other major use-of-force cases. The reviews, however, would occur after the cases have been closed — a role that seems perfunctory, members say. "We want to know: What are we really going to do?"
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Baltimore's police civilian review board has concerns that a new effort to garner input from the board is not meaningful, an official told a City Council committee on Wednesday night.  After years of neglect, the department has been making strides to make the board more relevant, and recently announced that it would refer major use of force investigations, such as police-involved shootings and in-custody deaths, to the board after they were completed....
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
The Baltimore Police Department says it will begin to post a log of its investigations into serious use of force by officers online, and for the first time will ask the city's civilian review board to look at shootings involving its officers and deaths of people in custody. Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said the move was the latest in a series intended to improve transparency and accountability. "We have a responsibility to be as forthright and transparent as the law allows us to be, especially when it comes to our use of force," Batts told reporters Tuesday.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Six city residents were sworn-in Monday to take seats on Baltimore's police civilian review board, part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's effort to remake a panel described as irrelevant and ineffective. The civilian board, which is tasked with reviewing police misconduct complaints, has sat half-vacant for years, and the panel's recommendations are rarely followed, according to reports in The Sun. The mayor also appointed a new chairwoman to lead her Anti-Animal Abuse Advisory Commission.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Five city residents have been nominated to take seats on Baltimore's police civilian review board, filling out a volunteer panel that has been described as irrelevant and ineffective. For years, the civilian review board has had four vacancies out of nine positions, indicative of the erosion of interest in the once-controversial board by city officials and police. Baltimore's board sometimes gets misconduct complaints from police after the cases have already been closed, and the panel's recommendations - which are not made public - are very rarely followed.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1994
A Roman Catholic priest reinstated as pastor of a West Baltimore church where he had been accused of sexual abuse of a minor "should not have been reassigned to parish ministry," a blue-ribbon review board has advised Archbishop William H. Keeler.But Archbishop Keeler defended his decision to return the Rev. Maurice J. Blackwell in December to his pastorate at St. Edward Church at Poplar Grove Street and Lafayette Avenue. The priest had been removed from the post for nearly three months while he underwent counseling at an evaluation and treatment center in Hartford, Conn.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | November 12, 1991
The state board that licenses and disciplines physicians should distance itself from the medical establishment and open its records to the public, legislative analysts say.The 15-member Board of Physician Quality Assurance, which by law has only three non-physicians, should also add two more consumer members, according to a review by the legislature's Department of Fiscal Services.The recently released audit concludes that while the board's performance has improved in its three years of work, several major changes are still needed to ensure the competency of Maryland's doctors.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
An attorney for a teenager who said his jaw was broken in an encounter with Baltimore police dismissed the city's civilian review board as a "proxy" for police after nearly three years have passed without a ruling on the case. In July 2010, Yardell Henderson, then 16, filed a complaint with internal affairs in which he said he was beaten by police in Northwest Baltimore during an incident that did not result in his arrest or criminal charges. He also contacted the civilian review board, a volunteer panel formed to great fanfare in the late 1990s, to provide a check on police.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
A Northwest Baltimore woman was nominated to the city's police civilian review board on Monday night, the first move in filling as much as eight positions on the beleaguered nine-member board.  The nomination of Sunny Luisa Cooper for the unpaid position represents the second time Cooper's name has been submitted to the board, which investigates citizen complaints of abusive language and excessive force by police. She was originally put forward along with two others by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in 2011, and confirmed by the council, but the swearing-in never took place.
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