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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - During Bernadine Healy's tumultuous final six months as president of the American Red Cross, the nonprofit agency awarded her $1.9 million. As a result, Healy's replacement, former Rear Adm. Marsha Evans, and the agency's board have launched separate reviews of the way the Red Cross compensates its senior employees. Healy wept in public frustration when she was forced out of the top American Red Cross job in the tense and confusing aftermath of the Sept. 11 terror attacks in the fall of 2001.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Maryland is now facing a $405 million revenue shortfall over this year and next, largely the result of sluggish job growth, stagnant incomes and a weak housing market, state officials reported Wednesday. Five years after the official end of the recession, Maryland continues to confront fiscal trouble. This latest shortfall will force Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration and the General Assembly to make deeper cuts than previously expected to balance the state's roughly $40 billion budget.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
A panel of the state's fiscal leaders said Thursday that the government will have more money than legislators expected when they approved the state's spending plan, reversing a nearly three-year trend of downward revisions because of plummeting tax revenues. The projected $89 million increase is not enough to rescind hundreds of millions of dollars in cuts made to programs during the 2010 legislative session. But leaders said that when it is combined with the $180 million in extra revenue reported last month from the fiscal year that ended in June, it indicates that the economy is improving.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
When the news broke nearly two years ago that Maryland was likely headed for the Big Ten, former Terps basketball star Len Elmore was among the first to raise concerns. Elmore, an ESPN college basketball analyst and attorney, openly wondered whether the lure of Big Ten money truly outweighed leaving behind the Atlantic Coast Conference, of which Maryland was a founding member. He also worried about the hit the school could take from the ACC's exit fee. This week, Elmore - in Washington for a meeting of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, of which he is a member - revisited the topic.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
I understand why speed cameras are needed at all times in construction zones; even if there are no workers present, the highway lanes are often narrow and twisting and require a lower speed ("Delays, detours and dead ends on cameras," Nov. 25). Regarding school zone cameras, however, are we supposed to believe that a child hit by a vehicle traveling 12 mph over the speed limit sustains more serious injuries than a child struck by car going only 11 mph over the limit? Since the answer is obviously not, why then are vehicles ticketed only if they exceed the posted limit by 12 mph or more?
BUSINESS
February 9, 2010
United Airlines said Monday that January traffic rose, and it collected more revenue from each passenger. United said it collected 9.5 percent to 11.5 percent more for each passenger flown one mile in January compared with January 2009. Throughout last year airlines struggled to raise fares, so any increase in so-called unit revenue should be welcomed by the industry. - Associated Press div.talkforum #creditfooter { display: none; } div.talkforum .feedItemAuthor { display: none; }
EXPLORE
November 8, 2012
Your front-page article "Speed cameras called a success" (Oct. 25) is going to earn you a flood of letters from those who want to break the law and escape the consequences. Everyone is all hot for "personal responsibility" these days, so why don't we start there? But if that doesn't work, and people won't regulate their own behavior, the state will do it for them, because the state will have order. But what really bugs me about the camera controversy is the almost binary nature of the debate.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
We wish to recognize the leadership of U.S. Senators Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin on behalf of the Land and Water Conservation Fund. LWCF is the program that ensures Maryland has the resources our parks, forests, and wildlife areas need to provide opportunities for outdoor recreation and to strengthen our economy. If you enjoy visiting a neighborhood or state park, the odds are that the fund helped to make this possible. LWCF has also preserved for future generations the experiences of canoeing Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge's water trails, visiting Antietam National Battlefield, and camping at Assateague Island National Seashore.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2011
While Under Armour's core apparel lines drove strong revenue results in the third quarter, the company is preparing to launch even more products, including sneakers, as well as to enter new markets, such as China, company officials said Tuesday while announcing earnings. "We're seeing great success in our two-fold strategy of innovating to drive better performance product with higher prices in our core while expanding our reach beyond our core with new products," President and CEO Kevin Plank told investors during a conference call.
NEWS
May 5, 2014
As I rode from Howard County and crossed Main Street I saw that the speed camera had been moved and a small 25 mph sign with a really small speed camera sign had been moved from the previous site. Is the purpose of the speed posted as one had just come from a 40 mph area to slow speed or to gain more revenue? I believe that we should protect our children and walkers, but I believe that the placement of this sign which is not easily read until one is on top of it is to gain more revenue.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
With the newly opened Horseshoe Casino Baltimore chipping in nearly $1 million a day, revenues from Maryland casinos reached a new monthly record in August, topping $80 million for the first time. The Horseshoe, which opened Aug. 26, generated $5.7 million, or more from its slots and table games in its first six days than the $4.2 million reported for the whole month at the significantly smaller Rocky Gap Casino Resort — and nearly as much as the Casino at Ocean Downs' $5.9 million.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
A planned Southern Maryland power plant that was to be built with state help — an arrangement that set off an industry fight — landed financing Friday to start construction despite a court ruling quashing the assistance. Silver Spring-based Competitive Power Ventures and its partners said they received financing from 15 lenders, including GE Energy Financial Services, which anchored the effort. Major construction on the $775 million Waldorf plant is expected to start in September.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Maryland's four casinos brought in $75.9 million in July, a jump of nearly 10 percent from the same month a year earlier, with the bulk of the increase coming from the state's largest casino, Maryland Live, the state lottery agency reported Tuesday. The total for slot machines and table game revenues was up 9.7 percent, or $6.7 million, from July 2013. Most of that increase came at Maryland Live in Arundel Mills where revenue jumped 11 percent year-over-year to $58.2 million in July.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
State regulators on Tuesday rejected rate increases for taxis and ordered all operators to install new credit-card-reading smart meters by the end of the year. The Maryland Public Service Commission said the new meters will bring more predictability and better service to customers hailing cabs in Baltimore city and county, while providing better financial data for use in future rate reviews. The commission cited the lack of reliable data as a major reason for rejecting rate increases.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
The Horseshoe Casino Baltimore won't open until August, but the woman warrior's face on Sky Rider already glows alluringly on the second floor, offering the chance at "Silver Treasures. " The slot machine stands among a sea of recent arrivals at the Russell Street casino: Lucky Larry's Lobster Mania, A Win for All Seasons, Whales of Cash, Ultimate Sevens, Super Monopoly Money. Many remain wrapped in plastic. Hard-hatted technicians tend to the electronics of others. Some like Sky Rider are fully lit up, their wheels spinning for no one for now. The 2,500 slot machines being installed at Horseshoe incorporate the latest technology and pop-culture themes, ranging from "The Walking Dead" to the retro 1960s-era "Batman" television show.
NEWS
By Marty Conway | June 2, 2014
The recent three-day 2014 NCAA Men's Lacrosse championship event at M&T Stadium drew the lowest attendance yet - 78,234 - since Baltimore introduced it to NFL stadiums in 2003. And the Baltimore Ravens, the main stadium tenant, did not submit a bid to host the event in 2015 through 2018 in part because of potential parking lot conflicts during simultaneous Orioles games. How does this happen with a sporting event and geographic region, that seem to be so right for one another? With the sport's national governing body, US Lacrosse, here, along with the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame,  there is little doubt about the depth of both participation and support for the sport locally, and within 100 miles from Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Millennial Media lost $3.8 million despite a surge to $96.7 million in revenue in the fourth quarter of 2013, with both results beating analysts' expectations, but shares fell in after-hours trading on shaky expectations going forward. The Baltimore mobile advertising company's revenue jumped by two-thirds compared with the fourth quarter of 2012, when it reported $58 million in sales and posted a profit of $2.6 million. It completed a mostly stock deal worth about $174 million to acquire Boston-based Jumptap in November that helped drive growth.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
With all the screaming and scandal and nonsense over a possible casino at National Harbor, has no one asked how many casinos we need here in Maryland ("Baltimore casino names manager," Sept. 26)? Once upon a time this nation produced products that could be sold for profit and the generation of tax dollars. Today, while politicians allow the steel industry in Maryland and across America to die, they fall all over themselves building casinos that generate no products and rely on income earned in other lines of work.
NEWS
May 14, 2014
The check-out inquiry was "paper or plastic?" But it's no longer a choice. Merchants love plastic. It's easy to store and less expensive than paper. Multiple bags can handle heavier items. Thin plastic wraps around whatever is in the bag and around one's hand. But that clinging feature is horrible for the aquatic environment ( "Plastic bag fee for city shoppers proposed - again," May 9). The new bag ban fans are local governments. Montgomery County and Washington, D.C., have them.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
Ricarda Easton and Will McKenna have done an excellent job of summarizing the many issues that need to be addressed by the Baltimore's new CEO of schools regarding charter schools ( "Holding back the city's charter schools," May 7). Incoming Superintendent Gregory Thornton would be well advised also to examine a new report from the University of Arkansas that compares funding of charter schools to traditional schools (" which discusses the disparity between funding in almost every state.
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