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NEWS
May 13, 1995
An Anne Arundel Circuit judge ordered prosecutors to reveal what deals it may have made with witnesses in the trial of two brothers charged with being drug kingpins.Judge H. Chester Goudy Jr. ordered prosecutors to disclose the "existence and substance of promises of immunity, leniency or preferentialtreatment" of its witnesses against Roger Lee Emory, 46, of Glen Burnie and his brother, James Mitchell Emory, 48, of Pasadena. Both men were convicted of drug kingpin charges April 19, 1993, but their convictions were overturned last September by the 0Court of Special Appeals.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine L. Fillat | October 11, 1991
KATZENSTEIN GALLERYScarlett Place. "Maryland Printmakers:A Survey of Members' Works" When Mark Moreland curated this show (through Oct. 26), he looked for works that reveal diversity of technique and subject matter. Thus, from 160 members, he chose 17 pieces by 17 artists that include, in the abstract world, an aquatint in shades of gray by Richard Hellman and a "colorful, moving" monotype by Dorothea Barrick. In representational works, he offers Elizabeth Gaither Ochs' aquatint of a Gothic Victorian house and a colorful litho titled "Baltimore Blaze" by Caroline Thorington.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Orioles manager Buck Showalter met the media prior to the Orioles' American League Division Series workout and he revealed little about what his plans are for his roster. Yes, he's settled on a starter for Friday, but hasn't announced it yet. Yes, he knows pretty much which way he is leaning for his roster, but he wanted to talk to some of his players during the workout first. He said he's still kicking around 10 or 11 pitchers. He wouldn't go into specifics, but in that scenario you have to figure Jimmy Paredes or Quintin Berry has made it. And if he takes 10 pitchers, then both have likely made it (Alexi Casilla and Steve Clevenger are here for the workout, but they remain long shots)
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN CAMPBELL and SUSAN CAMPBELL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 14, 2002
Go ahead. You know you want to. The nice, white space on this page begs for it. No time? Then take this page to work. Sometime during the day, if you have that sort of job, a meeting will go long, your pen will be full and you know what will happen next. You'll doodle. When things slow down for Bil Paul, a public relations specialist and part-time reporter in California, he certainly doodles. He draws - no, make that constructs - elaborate geometric works that look almost like family shields.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | June 19, 1991
TV Execs Reveal Their Darkest Secrets! Learn How They Lure Viewers With Underhanded Techniques! You'll Never Feel The Same About Tuning In Again!OK, OK, so that's an exaggeration. But no more of one than some TV promoters use to entice you to watch a show. You may think yours is the finger controlling the remote, but often many other hands have been at work behind the scenes, seducing you with anything from high-grade hype to near deception.Check out these tricks of the trade presented by executives at a broadcast conference ending today at the Baltimore Convention Center:* In designing a promotion for the TV premiere of "Satisfaction," NBC learned that Julia Roberts had a small role in the box-office bomb starring Justine Bateman.
NEWS
June 10, 1997
Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith, the 82-year-old Columbia recluse who died in February, had an affinity for gold. Much of her $1.8 million in stocks was in South African gold mining companies, and her $11,000 coin collection was dominated by gold coins.Those holdings were revealed in a partial inventory of her possessions filed last week in the Howard County Orphans' Court by attorneys for two of Smith's cousins -- Carolyn Smith of Baltimore and Tabi Williamson of Eureka, Calif. They will inherit Smith's 300 acres of undeveloped farmland along Route 175.Smith, who died without a will, was not married.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | October 20, 1993
The fight for control of the state's thoroughbred tracks has taken another legal twist.Laurel/Pimlico track operator Joe De Francis said his estranged partners, Tom and Bob Manfuso, were "playing games" yesterday after the Manfuso brothers initiated what he called "an utterly and completely specious" proceeding against his late father's estate in the Howard County Orphans Court."
NEWS
By Gregory D. Foster | April 7, 1996
The White House, owing perhaps to the tabloid fatigue of the general public, seems to have weathered the acute anxiety its denizens reportedly experienced in anticipation of the recent publication of James B. Stewart's book, "Blood Sport: The President and His Adversaries."That there was such anxiety, though, is reason enough for us dispirited voters to see what the book has to say before the wages of November -- and the cheapened civic sacrament of voting -- are upon us.If "Blood Sport" does nothing else, its exposure of the arrogance of power, the venality of unfettered ambition, the abuse of public office, and the exploitation of personal relationships commands our attention to the central issue in the coming presidential campaign: the character of the person(s)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 1991
NEW YORK -- The woman who accused William Kennedy Smith of rape in the case that ended with Mr. Smith's acquittal last week is to be interviewed for the 10 p.m. Thursday broadcast of the ABC News program "PrimeTime Live."Diane Sawyer, a co-anchor of the program, is to tape the interview in the next two days.An ABC News executive, speaking on condition of anonymity, said yesterday that the network is "proceeding with the understanding that this young woman is coming forward and will identify herself."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt Cech and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Past the boutiques and restaurants on Main Street in Ellicott City, it would be easy to miss Dee Cunningham's painting studio. The skate shop that shows art and the metal sculptor get overlooked, too. There's a ceramic artist, a jewelry maker, a photographer, a specialty car painter and more than a dozen others.  So Cunningham created an event to highlight the hidden art scene in the former mill town.  Artwalk will take place Oct. 11,...
NEWS
By Terry Lee-Wilk | September 12, 2014
As a mom of three boys in a sports-loving household, I am no stranger to discussing the day in sports at the dinner table: the Top 10 plays of the week, the wise picks for fantasy football and predictions for upcoming games. Last month, I found myself unprepared for a discussion that came up about Mo'ne Davis, the 13-year-old Little League female baseball phenom. "Isn't it great that Mo'ne Davis is kicking butt at the Little League World Series?" I said with enthusiasm as I poured the milk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
In an age when no cinematic product seems safe from being targeted for a theatrical make-over, and when so few of these movies-turned-musicals end up having much substance to offer, "Once" impresses all the more. This modest-scaled work, now getting its Baltimore debut at the Hippodrome, manages to preserve the essence of the hit indie film from 2007 written and directed by John Carney, while creating some unusual and genuine magic of its own. The screen version of "Once" introduced two engaging characters identified, in Everyman fashion, as Guy, a frustrated street musician in Dublin; and Girl, a Czech immigrant who happens upon him and finds herself riveted by his songs.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake leads the money race against potential future political opponents with more than $350,000 on hand, a review of the most recent campaign finance reports shows. Rawlings-Blake, who is up for re-election in November 2016, raised about $15,000 in the most recent reporting period, which ran from June 9 to Aug. 19. The filings were due Aug. 26. While potential mayoral contenders are keeping their plans close to the vest, political observers say the filings reveal others who might be considering a run for the city's top elected post.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
A month after suspending Ravens running back Ray Rice two games for domestic violence, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell acknowledged he "didn't get it right" and announced significantly harsher penalties for players who commit abuse or sexual assault, including possible lifetime bans for second offenders. The league released its tougher stance the same day the House of Ruth Maryland and the Ravens revealed a three-year partnership that will include a $600,000 donation from the team, training for the players and staff and promotional work on behalf of the centers for abused women and children.
NEWS
By David Horsey | August 26, 2014
Hollywood has come up with some fearsome swarms of monstrous villains -- think of the orcs in "The Hobbit" or the zombies in "World War Z" -- but those computer-generated creatures are nothing compared to the all-too-real swarm of monsters that have rallied to the black banner of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. ISIS (or ISIL, the alternative version of the name that substitutes the broader geographic term, Levant, for Syria) may be the most despicable band of barbarians to plague the world since the Khmer Rouge finished stacking up the skulls of their victims in Cambodia 35 years ago. Emerging from the chaos of the Syrian civil war, ISIS militants have swept across the Iraqi desert and seized control in much of that country over the last two months.
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | May 21, 2006
Earlier this month, two San Francisco Chronicle reporters received federal subpoenas demanding that they identify the sources who provided them with secret grand jury testimony from an investigation into illegal drug use in Major League Baseball. The documents were the basis of articles by reporters Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams, published in June and December 2004, that described the alleged use of steroids by such players as Barry Bonds and Jason Giambi. Those articles led to congressional hearings last year and changes in baseball's drug-testing policies.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1996
Far more dramatically than any picture from Auschwitz, Turner Broadcasting's "Survivors of the Holocaust" reveals the true horror unleashed by Nazi Germany during World War II.The horror is not simply that people died, or that men could be so brutal. The real horror is that the people who died were no different from the rest of us; that a supposedly civilized nation simply let it happen; that those who survived were no less victims than those who died.And why did all this happen? Simply because some people hated some other people -- not unlike the present circumstances in Bosnia, where untold thousands have died for the crime of being born members of a certain ethnic group.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
When a high-ranking O'Malley administration official was fired after allegedly steering about $774,000 in federal grant money to a company to which the official had close ties, no announcement was made. Only this week was the dismissal two years ago made public by legislative auditors. Auditors revealed that an inspector general had completed a report in 2013 that found misuse of government funds and a "serious conflict of interest" on the part of the top official of the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation's Division of Workforce Development.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In recent weeks, the Orioles have built the largest division lead in baseball as they chase their first American League East title in 17 years, but the club now faces the possibility of being without All-Star third baseman Manny Machado for an extended amount of time. An MRI performed Tuesday revealed no apparent structural damage, and the club said Machado was diagnosed with a right knee ligament sprain. In some ways, that was good news - especially given how Machado's season ended last year with a left knee injury that required offseason surgery - but it appears that this injury could force Machado to the 15-day disabled list.
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