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By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | March 28, 2010
New large developments in Howard County should plan on reusing wastewater instead of sending it into a Chesapeake Bay tributary, county officials say. Officials want reuse of wastewater to be the new standard for big projects, because of worries that tightening federal and state restrictions on nitrogen entering the bay could eventually outstrip the capacity of the county wastewater treatment plant on the Little Patuxent River in Savage. "It's better for the environment, and it's a response to how we're going to grow effectively," said County Executive Ken Ulman, a Democrat, about a new county policy still being discussed.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Alice Johnson noticed the checker boards that recently popped up behind her house, a neat brick rowhouse in the Barclay neighborhood of Baltimore. "People will definitely use them," she said. "I play. I wish I could play chess, too. " She should have time to learn. The boards have been etched permanently into 1,000-pound slabs of marble in a new community courtyard. The stones are salvaged steps from several area houses, and the artist who placed them in the courtyard hopes they become a new kind of Baltimore front steps - where urban dwellers have long gathered, told stories and played games.
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NEWS
By William Donald Schaefer | February 16, 2001
THERE ARE THREE answers I give when asked why I care about saving Memorial Stadium: Because I'm the state comptroller. Because I'm a veteran. Because I believe Baltimore is one of the greatest cities in the world. As comptroller, my first concern must be for the wise use of the state's resources. I hate wasting money. To demolish -- the cost of which is nearly $3 million -- an asset valued at about $30 million, when alternatives for its reuse exist, is a tragic waste. To locate there only institutions that provide no revenues to the city's struggling tax base -- and in fact, require the expenditure of public funds -- is another waste.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
With reference to the "bag tax" in Baltimore, how can 10 cents hurt anyone? To say that we are overtaxed is pretty ridiculous ( "Shoppers in city may see 10-cent bag fee Jan. 21). If a 10-cent tax is going to hurt someone, then certainly they are not paying any taxes already, so 10 cents won't hurt. Anyway, the whole point of the charge on shopping bags is to reduce pollution, so the answer should be obvious - don't throw the bags away. Take them back to the store with you next time and reuse them.
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | January 26, 1997
Dear Mr. Gisriel:I'm interested in what information you can tell me about the possible reuse of "Brownfields" or contaminated industrial sites in Maryland.Sam HearnLuthervilleDear Mr. Hearn:Brownfields is a relatively recent term of art which applies to vacant or under-utilized industrial or commercial facilities with existing or perceived environmental contamination.In Baltimore, for example, which lost more than 50 percent of its manufacturing jobs between 1970 and 1990, there is estimated to be in excess of 1,000 acres of vacant industrial land, with thousands more acres of existing uses with potentially difficult reuse potential.
NEWS
June 14, 1996
PLEASE CALL IT reusing, or recycling, or landfill capacity conservation, but not scavenging. There's an unseemly connotation to that word, a disparaging effect.But by all means participate in this new effort by Carroll County to allow residents to trade trash at the Northern Landfill on Route 140 near Westminster, reducing the volume of refuse that must be buried and extending the useful lives of common castoffs.While rubbish rummaging certainly won't appeal to everyone, the decision by the county commissioners to approve a reusing center (at the former recycling center)
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2000
Recycling may help cut down on waste, but a powerful Maryland state senator believes it could be too risky for the operating room. Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell, chairman of the Finance Committee, has taken aim at a quietly growing practice by hospitals and doctors of re-using disposable medical devices. The Baltimore County Democrat has introduced a bill, scheduled for a hearing today in Annapolis, that would forbid hospitals and clinics in Maryland from re-using so-called "single-use" devices unless they first notify patients and get their signed consent.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2001
Scott Wilson is mining gold. Not to mention silver and palladium. Every computer he breaks down in his 4,200-square-foot warehouse in Jessup -- removing hard drives and circuit boards and wires and belts -- contains enough precious metal to make this new approach on the junk business financially worthwhile. Each component goes in a different direction. Some to the shredder for reuse. Some to businesses with expertise in extracting metals for reuse. Some just for reuse. Reuse -- or recycling -- is what's going on here.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 1999
When patients come to the University of Virginia Health System to have an abnormal heart rhythm diagnosed or treated, they are told that doctors will be threading thin wires through their veins directly into their heart. They learn that they face a slight risk of infection, or of damage to the heart, lungs or blood vessels from the invasive procedure.But there is one thing they are not told: Although the catheters and wires are labeled "single use only," they might have been used before. They have been cleaned and sterilized, but they have spent time in someone else's blood vessels and heart.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2003
With cities and counties strapped for money and often unable to expand recycling beyond the basics - newspapers, soda cans and plastic bottles - recycling advocates are turning to a new partner to advance the next frontier in their cause: corporate America. Companies from Nike Inc. to Dell Computer Corp. to Panasonic have begun programs to recycle old or unwanted materials in their manufacturing processes, and there's potential for more growth in that area, according to members of the National Recycling Coalition, which is holding a "recycling congress" in Baltimore this week.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Last year my potted impatiens had that terrible new disease, impatiens downy mildew, and all died. Can I use my old infected potting soil in non-flower beds this year? Send it to the landfill? Impatiens downy mildew spores overwinter in infected plant debris, not soil per se. Remove all obvious plant debris and a couple of the top inches of soil that may have minute bits of debris in it. Send that to the landfill. You can use the rest of the potting soil elsewhere in your landscape, but do be careful to wash and disinfect your pots before reusing them.
NEWS
By Edward Gents, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
Developer James W. Rousewas a pioneer at recycling other people's buildings for new uses, including Faneuil Hall in Boston and parts of the South Street Seaport historic district in Manhattan. Now one of the most prominent buildings he constructed from scratch - the former Rouse Co. headquarters in Columbia - is about to get a similar treatment from a successor to Rouse's firm. The Howard Hughes Corp. of Dallas, which succeeded Rouse and General Growth Properties as the master developer of Columbia, has a $20 million plan to convert the former Rouse headquarters on Little Patuxent Parkway from a single-occupant office building to a mixed-use, multitenant development with a 41,000 square-foot Whole Foods Market as the anchor.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | May 13, 2012
Stella Maris retirement and care center in Timonium has been undergoing a "green initiative" for the last year and a half. While the green movement has involved traditional steps — such as replacing light bulbs and recycling cans and paper — the biggest changes are in the food department, where utensils made from cornstarch and bowls made from sugar cane are now the norm. Available right now only in the center's retail cafe, the new utensils and plates are one of many steps the food department is taking to cut down its waste, according to Cheryl Mohn, director of dietary services for Stella Maris.
EXPLORE
November 2, 2011
Regarding the proposal to build a new elementary school in either Mays Chapel or Dulaney Springs, I believe there is a better solution to the York Road corridor overcrowding issue then building a school in either of the proposed locations. The solution should be the soon-to-be-vacant Carver Center for the Arts and Technology in Towson. In the near term, it will be used to house the Stoneleigh students while their facility undergoes an addition and refurbishment. But after that, Carver can be refurbished — and an addition added, if required —then become the new Towson East Elementary School.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | March 28, 2010
New large developments in Howard County should plan on reusing wastewater instead of sending it into a Chesapeake Bay tributary, county officials say. Officials want reuse of wastewater to be the new standard for big projects, because of worries that tightening federal and state restrictions on nitrogen entering the bay could eventually outstrip the capacity of the county wastewater treatment plant on the Little Patuxent River in Savage. "It's better for the environment, and it's a response to how we're going to grow effectively," said County Executive Ken Ulman, a Democrat, about a new county policy still being discussed.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
In a bid to reduce waste and control costs, a growing number of U.S. hospitals are now cleaning and reusing tools such as compression sleeves, laparoscopic ports, and other medical and surgical items labeled for one-time use. Hospital administrators had been behind the move, called reprocessing, but more recently it's been fueled by environmentally minded workers looking to change the health care industry's status as one of the largest contributors to...
NEWS
July 2, 2006
FIND OF THE WEEK THE WAVE Jennifer Roberts' new book, Good Green Kitchens: The Ultimate Resource for Creating a Beautiful, Healthy, Eco-Friendly Kitchen (Gibbs Smith, $29.95), offers scores of tips, including this one for homeowners planning to remodel their kitchen: "Reuse as much of the existing kitchen as you can, including structural elements, cabinets, flooring, counters and appliances. Donate or recycle what you can't reuse. And when buying new goods, look for salvaged building materials and vintage furnishings."
NEWS
February 23, 1999
ANNAPOLITANS worry that they may not have much of a say in the reuse of the Anne Arundel Medical Center, the downtown hospital that will relocate in 2001 to a new facility in outlying Parole. Considering the hospital's strategic location in the heart of Annapolis' historic district -- it has been at Franklin and Cathedral streets since townsfolk created "The Annapolis Emergency Hospital" in 1902 -- it is natural that the residents would be wary about the property's future use.They will get their say. AAMC has created a hospital site reuse committee that includes local business leaders and residents.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 25, 2009
The teller windows have given way to a walnut-grain registration desk. The former president's office has become a conference room. One of the vaults is now a storage area for sheets and towels. Just about every corner of the former Old Town National Bank building has been put to use in its $11.5 million transformation into Baltimore's newest extended-stay hotel, the Holiday Inn Express. The seven-level, 70-room building at 221 N. Gay St. reopened this fall as part of a wave of hotels planned for Baltimore, and a two-day grand opening has been scheduled for Jan. 13 and 14. According to the developers, this is one of the first times that a Holiday Inn Express has been created inside a historic structure instead of being built from the ground up. "We were able to utilize the entire building, which was a big bonus," said Nicholas Piscatelli, the Baltimore developer who started the project.
NEWS
June 18, 2009
It's laudable that the Baltimore City Council wants to encourage residents to cut down on their use of plastic and paper bags at grocery stores, but slapping a 25-cent fee on every bag - possibly the highest levy in the country - isn't the right way to go. It smacks of a tax on the poor in the middle of a recession. The city should, by all means, find ways to encourage residents to take reusable bags to the grocery store, perhaps by working with merchants to make them readily available at a discount or for free, particularly in inner-city neighborhoods.
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