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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | February 15, 1996
Jim Opasik and Mary Deacon Opasik are a husband and wife team of artists who aren't a team. That is, they're both artists, and they both work in assemblage, but they work separately.He fashions animals and other creatures from everyday objects such as kitchen utensils, and his creations often bring a smile to the viewer. She uses found objects to create pieces that deal with life-related themes, such as birth, parenthood and loss. Now the Baltimore Life Gallery is showing a combined retrospective of their work called "Opasiks to Date."
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
With the 2013 first-year player draft beginning tonight in Secaucus, N.J., it's worth taking a peek back at where some of the Orioles' notable picks from last season ended up - from the majors to the minors and some who opted to attend college.   Kevin Gausman, RHP, LSU Drafted: Round 1, No. 4 overall Then: Gausman wrapped up a sophomore season in which he won 12 games with a 2.77 ERA for the Tigers. A 2012 first-team All-American, Gausman was regarded as one of the top college arms in the draft, and he struck out 135 batters in 123 2/3 innings in his final year at LSU. Now: The right-hander is already a contributor to the big league club.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | February 17, 2000
The Phillips Collection in Washington presents the first major retrospective of Honore Daumier, the 19th-century painter, sculptor, draughtsman and caricaturist best known for his scathing political cartoons and satirical prints on social themes. The show features 245 works, including paintings, watercolors, drawings, sculptureand lithographs that illustrate Daumier's achievement. It opens Saturday and runs through May 14. The Phillips Collection is at 1600 21st St. N.W., in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
Former Maryland poet laureate Lucille Clifton was a former "Jeopardy" champion who used a Ouija board to communicate with her dead mother. She was a survivor of childhood sexual abuse who as an adult unabashedly celebrated her physical self. And in the newly released, 720-page volume of her collected poems, Clifton writes about cancer and racism and motherhood and her hips. "The Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton, 1965-2010" includes a foreword by Nobel laureate Toni Morrison.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
To sit and chat awhile with Jerzy Kajetanski, a World War II Polish resistance fighter and Nazi labor camp prisoner, you would not sense that this is a man full of emotion and vision.At 79, his hair is wispy and white. The body bends with age. In conversation, he is a man of few words.It is his paintings, thousands created in a lifetime filled with extreme despair, deprivation and derision, that are his power, his words."This man may very well be one the great unfound gems of modern-day art. To look at him you wouldn't know it, but he's just a frenzy of emotions, ideas and energy," says Rhoda Toback, curator of a 50-year retrospective of the Columbia resident's work.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | June 27, 1991
The Maryland Art Place retrospective of Virginia photographer Sally Mann immediately gives the impression that her camera has not been put down in the last 20 years.Although this mini-retrospective capsulizes her various landscape and portrait series too briefly to offer a firm enough sense of the photographer, her skill in various formats always comes through. You can easily see why she was included in the recent Whitney Biennial in New York, where her photographs more than held their own.Her most striking body of work in the MAP exhibit is a series of "Family Pictures" done from 1985 to the present.
NEWS
January 5, 1993
Stephen HarveyAssociate film curatorBROOKLYN, N.Y. -- Stephen Harvey, associate curator of film the Museum of Modern Art, died of AIDS-related complications Friday at age 43.A film curator at the Museum of Modern Art since 1972, he had organized major retrospectives and programs on such film figures as Vincente Minnelli, Vittorio de Sica and Joseph Mankiewicz.His book, "Directed by Vincente Minnelli," published in 1990 by HarperCollins, is widely considered the definitive study of Minnelli and the MGM studio system of his time.
NEWS
By William Tuohy and William Tuohy,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 1992
LONDON -- Francis Bacon, widely regarded as Britain's greatest contemporary painter, died of a heart attack in Madrid yesterday while visiting friends in Spain.The 82-year-old painter was highly controversial in traditional artistic circles because his powerful canvases, executed with splashing brush strokes, were often concerned with the themes of sex, suffering and death. Many regarded his paintings as obscene.But his work commanded high prices. A Bacon triptych recently sold in New York for $7 million.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 31, 2004
On Tuesday, the American Film Institute's Silver Theater in Silver Spring will present "The Short Films & Videos of Skizz Cyzyk: a retrospective spanning 1983 to present." Baltimore cineastes have grown to know Cyzyk even better than they know his films because of the gracious, humorous and erudite introductions he gives to visiting moviemakers at several Charm City festivals. So rather than make a vain attempt to match his charm and learning, we cleverly asked Skizz to introduce himself.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 17, 1993
Jane K. Bledsoe, curator of the Elaine de Kooning retrospective that opens at the Maryland Institute College of Art this week, says that when the artist taught at the University of Georgia in the 1970s, "there was this one particular book on art and culture, and this was the shining light and path to everything. She carried it around with her and insisted that everyone read that book."She would do that with people. Whoever she took under her wing she became absolutely intensely involved in helping them, nurturing them, making them be artists, do whatever it was that they wanted to do."
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | June 3, 2012
During her long career as a sculptor and painter in Baltimore, Amalie Rothschild developed a distinctive take on geometric abstraction. You can follow the arc of that career in a gallery-filling retrospective at Towson University's Center for the Arts Gallery. Rothschild (1916-2001) was familiar with various approaches to 20th-century modernism and responded in her own way. Henri Matisse's 1935 oil painting "The Pink Nude," which belongs to the Baltimore Museum of Art 's Cone Collection, directly inspired two works by Rothschild in the present exhibit.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
As David Swanson points out in his recent article, the War of 1812 was indeed senseless, born of wanton stupidity ("America's first war of choice: 1812). It served no useful purpose, local battle glories notwithstanding. Not all wars are like that, however. World War II is rightfully regarded as a necessary and epic struggle against powers that would have plunged the world into chaos. Consider, though, how Nazi Germany could have been checkmated earlier, and the whole European conflict resolved at a tiny fraction of its ultimate cost in dollars and lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Sarah Palin says it's a lie. Her press spokeswoman calls it "sick. " Other supporters of the former Alaska governor refer to it as a "hit job" - concocted by Hollywood leftists and the liberal media. Filmed in and around Baltimore last year, " HBO "s "Game Change," won't premiere until next Saturday. But even mostly sight unseen, the two-hour made-for-TV movie about John McCain's 2008 presidential campaign has generated a torrent of debate. Taking on a polarizing figure like Sarah Palin already makes "Game Change" one of the most evocative productions of the year.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 17, 2009
If you didn't know that this is National Opera Week, a glance at the local scene would make you suspect something of the kind. Three companies in Baltimore alone will be busy with performances; add in College Park and Washington, and it looks like an epidemic. The designation of Nov. 13 to 22 as National Opera Week (easier to market than National Opera Ten-Day Period) was made by Opera America, the service organization representing about 150 companies, and the National Endowment for the Arts.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2008
Baltimore's reigning best film series, the Charles Theatre's six-month Alfred Hitchcock retrospective, wraps this weekend with 1955's To Catch a Thief, starring Cary Grant as John Robie, a reformed cat burglar who's being framed for a bunch of high-society jewel thefts in Monaco. Grace Kelly, in the film that introduced her to the tiny kingdom that would soon call her queen, is the stunning socialite who can't help but fall for his charms, even if she's not sure he can be trusted. Showtime is noon tomorrow at the Charles, 1711 N. Charles St., with encore screenings set for 7 p.m. Monday and 9 p.m. Thursday.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | February 6, 2008
When hearing the news that Bob Knight had resigned from Texas Tech, essentially ending his coaching career, the first thought that crossed my mind was exactly what Knight had said earlier: He was doing this to give his son, Pat, a chance to become a head coach. The second thought was this: My career will end without being kicked, punched or hit by a chair thrown by Bob Knight. Not that I didn't give him the opportunity. In covering college basketball for more than 30 years, I found myself many times in the line of fire with the combustible basketball legend who became the winningest coach in men's Division I history.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine SIMON SAMPLER and J.D. Considine SIMON SAMPLER,Pop Music Critic | September 26, 1993
What is the measure of a man's career? A man, say, like Paul Simon?An obvious answer would be to look at his work and see what sort of picture it makes when it has all been fitted together. And that, as any curator will tell you, is no walk in the park.Imagine, then, how tough it must be when the person assembling that retrospective is the artist himself. In addition to the dirty job of deciding what goes and what stays, he must also contend with the potentially prickly issue of artistic identity.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | June 3, 2012
During her long career as a sculptor and painter in Baltimore, Amalie Rothschild developed a distinctive take on geometric abstraction. You can follow the arc of that career in a gallery-filling retrospective at Towson University's Center for the Arts Gallery. Rothschild (1916-2001) was familiar with various approaches to 20th-century modernism and responded in her own way. Henri Matisse's 1935 oil painting "The Pink Nude," which belongs to the Baltimore Museum of Art 's Cone Collection, directly inspired two works by Rothschild in the present exhibit.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | August 12, 2007
Growing up in pre-World War II Italy, Corrado DePinto simulated an oil painting. Unable to afford oil paints, the 8-year-old mixed his watercolors with olive oil. He used the concoction to paint his first seascape, a rendering he created on a piece of cardboard that he tore out of a shoebox lid. "I made the paint like a salad," recalled DePinto, 75, of Bel Air. "And it worked. I was flabbergasted with the finished painting. I was so proud of it." The painting remained with him throughout the war and was one of a few belongings he brought with him when he came to the United States in 1974.
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