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HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
With a deadline Tuesday for uninsured Marylanders to secure health coverage retroactive to Jan. 1, would-be enrollees continued to report frustration with the state's troubled health exchange. Matthew Silverglate, a 29-year-old server and bartender from Ellicott City, said Monday he had been calling and logging on to the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange for two months, and still had not been able to price out a private health plan. Dr. Peter Beilenson, who heads an insurance cooperative that sells coverage on the exchange, said he made four separate calls last week, using four different names, to try to get an appointment with a plan navigator.
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HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
With a deadline Tuesday for uninsured Marylanders to secure health coverage retroactive to Jan. 1, would-be enrollees continued to report frustration with the state's troubled health exchange. Matthew Silverglate, a 29-year-old server and bartender from Ellicott City, said Monday he had been calling and logging on to the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange for two months, and still had not been able to price out a private health plan. Dr. Peter Beilenson, who heads an insurance cooperative that sells coverage on the exchange, said he made four separate calls last week, using four different names, to try to get an appointment with a plan navigator.
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NEWS
By PAUL CRAIG ROBERTS | August 11, 1993
Washington. -- President Clinton propagandizes against the rich, depriving them of legitimacy, and the Democrats are willing to violate the law to punish them. The Democrats have singled out ''the rich'' and the dead for unconstitutional retroactive taxation and are legislating this prohibited act.Clinton's tax increase, misleadingly termed a deficit-reduction plan, is a blatant assault on Article I, Section 9 of the Constitution, which explicitly forbids retroactive law. Moreover, it is contemptuous of all legal precedent.
HEALTH
By Michael Dresser and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
The O'Malley administration will propose emergency legislation to provide retroactive health coverage to people who tried to sign up by the end of the year but were stymied by the technical problems that have plagued Maryland's online insurance exchange. At a briefing Friday by Gov. Martin O'Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, officials said they hoped to put the bill on the fast track when the General Assembly begins its annual 90-day session Wednesday. Brown, the administration's point person on implementation of the federal Affordable Care Act, said the bill would allow a few hundred to as many as 5,000 people to receive coverage retroactive to Jan. 1 through the Maryland Health Insurance Plan, a state program created to insure high-risk customers.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1995
Homeowners in Linthicum and Broadneck who have been charged retroactively for sewer and water service at the county's new, higher rate will not receive refunds or credits, county officials said yesterday.Anne Arundel County Council members, who approved a 13.5 percent increase -- about $56 annually per household -- in the county's utility charges two months ago said they have been receiving angry letters and calls from constituents who have been "back-billed" at the higher rate.Although the increase did not go into effect until July 5, the county billed homeowners in Linthicum and Broadneck for April, May and June at the higher rate, explained John Hammond, the county's chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2001
Jim Roumell, a Chevy Chase investment adviser, had a beef with a mutual fund he put his clients' money into. He claims the fund told investors it was investing in Vietnam and instead put its money in Thailand just before the Thai market tanked. Roumell did what Americans typically do when they feel they've been deceived by someone who handles their money. He sued. His civil action, which charges that the directors of the Maryland-chartered fund failed to properly supervise managers, was filed in February 1998 under the rules in existence at that time.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2001
The Maryland Senate approved a bill yesterday to increase mutual fund directors' protections against lawsuits, rejecting opponents' arguments that its retroactive provisions unfairly seek to influence a pending lawsuit. The Senate voted to pass the measure, which the Maryland State Bar Association had criticized as a "snake," by a 36-12 margin. Last week, senators rejected by a 24-22 vote an amendment stripping the retroactive provision. A "snake" is generally defined as an obscure piece of legislation, usually little understood by members and crafted to benefit a particular special interest.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1998
Mid-Atlantic Medical Services Inc., a Rockville managed-care insurer, misinterpreted a new state law limiting recovery from doctors and hospitals after a claim is paid, a hearing officer for the Maryland Insurance Administration has ruled.In a decision announced yesterday, the hearing officer, Thomas Paul Raimondi, associate deputy insurance commissioner, said MAMSI may deduct past overpayments from future payments only within six months of paying the claim.The dispute arose as a result of a law limiting retroactive deductions that took effect Oct. 1. It was enacted by the legislature in response to complaints from doctors and hospitals that had been paid for work only to have money deducted much later.
NEWS
By A Sun reporter | May 9, 2007
A pair of proposals for a downtown Columbia project spawned a debate about retroactive laws, among other issues. The presumption against retroactive laws, Ohio Supreme Court Justice Paul E. Pfeifer observed, "embodies a legal doctrine centuries older than our Republic." Even children, he wrote in 2002, "understand this concept - they know, as we all instinctively did, that it isn't fair to change the rules in the middle of a game." That doctrine, though, is being challenged in Howard County by proposals aimed at the plan for a multimillion-dollar residential and retail tower in Columbia.
NEWS
By Erica C. Harrington and Erica C. Harrington,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1996
As the Columbia Association attempts to get the county's retroactive approval of changes made to the Fairway Hills Golf Course before its contentious opening last year, some nearby Howard residents have found their fears about flying balls and invasion of privacy have not been realized.The Howard County Planning Board is being asked to approve "red-line" changes CA made to the original plan for the course. The changes to tee heights, green locations and landscaping were made to the $5.2-million course during construction.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
A settlement agreement ending health benefits for Sparrows Point workers Aug. 31 was approved Thursday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del. The agreement, struck by mill owner RG Steel and the United Steelworkers union last week, also retroactively ended supplemental unemployment pay as of Aug. 10. Judge Kevin J. Carey, who is overseeing RG Steel's bankruptcy case, wrote in Thursday's court order that the deal appeared to be "in the best...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
About 3,000 paraeducators and other professional staff represented by the Baltimore Teachers Union will receive pay raises and more vacation time under a tentative deal struck by the union and city school system. The union announced Monday that the Paraprofessionals and School Related Personnel chapter of the BTU — which includes classroom assistants, teacher's aides, accountants, secretaries and office staff — will receive raises retroactive to July 1, 2010, and more holidays off. Members who do not work in a school will also be able to take a spring break.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
A Maryland Court of Appeals decision that petition signatures don't have to be legible to be valid is giving new hope to critics of development in downtown Columbia and Turf Valley, but Howard board of elections officials say the new wrinkle likely won't change anything. The court ruling Tuesday could make it easier to force a referendum for voters on contested zoning decisions, and Turf Valley critic Marc Norman is hoping it may also help revive his failed 2009 petition drive. Howard election board's acting administrator, Guy Mickley, said he doesn't think the new ruling will affect Howard cases, because the decision is not retroactive and legibility was not an issue in the vast majority of signature disqualifications.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
Comptroller Peter Franchot criticized the state Department of Juvenile Services for what he called the "administrative sloppiness" that led to a request Wednesday for the approval of $171 million in no-bid contracts for work that has already been performed. Juvenile Services Secretary Donald W. DeVore said he has made personnel changes and warned agency officials of "dire consequences" if they continue to circumvent state procurement procedures. He also said he is implementing better contract-tracking tools, included a color-coded "dashboard.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
The state's top court Thursday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit asking that a building contractor raze the luxury compound he built without permits on an island in the Magothy River. The lawsuit, filed by the Critical Area Commission in 2008, was the first filed under state environmental enforcement measures toughened by legislators only months earlier. They strengthened the law largely in response to the illegal construction on 2-acre Little Dobbins Island. The Court of Appeals said Thursday that the 2008 provisions could not be applied retroactively to the construction by Daryl C. Wagner and his company, DCW Dutchship Island LLC, that was discovered four years before the law took effect.
NEWS
By A Sun reporter | May 9, 2007
A pair of proposals for a downtown Columbia project spawned a debate about retroactive laws, among other issues. The presumption against retroactive laws, Ohio Supreme Court Justice Paul E. Pfeifer observed, "embodies a legal doctrine centuries older than our Republic." Even children, he wrote in 2002, "understand this concept - they know, as we all instinctively did, that it isn't fair to change the rules in the middle of a game." That doctrine, though, is being challenged in Howard County by proposals aimed at the plan for a multimillion-dollar residential and retail tower in Columbia.
NEWS
By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG AND DAVID E. SANGER and SHERYL GAY STOLBERG AND DAVID E. SANGER,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 20, 2006
After two months of insisting that President Bush did not need court approval to authorize wiretapping of calls between the United States and suspected terrorists abroad, the administration is trying to channel the political pressure for more oversight into retroactive congressional approval for the program. The administration opened negotiations with Congress last week, but it is far from clear whether Bush can get the votes he will need. The latest Republican to join the growing chorus of those seeking oversight is Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.
NEWS
February 16, 2001
RETROACTIVE laws, which apply to actions that occurred before the law was enacted, may occasionally have a broad public benefit. But generally they're a bad idea, and they've been repudiated repeatedly by the courts. So it's surprising that the General Assembly is trying for the third time in three years to pass such a law to favor mutual fund companies that lost in a court ruling. The bill would make it harder for investors to sue the directors of Maryland-based funds. Efforts to write retroactive laws are becoming more frequent in Annapolis, according to Sun reporter Michael Dresser.
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- When the White House's secret domestic surveillance program was disclosed last year, Sen. Arlen Specter was one of the first to leap into action, denouncing the wiretapping as "wrong" and insisting that President Bush acted outside the law by not seeking judicial or congressional approval. "We're not going to give him a blank check," the Republican from Pennsylvania insisted at the time. So when Specter, well-known as a GOP maverick and administration critic, announced this month that he would offer a bill that would allow -- but not compel -- the administration to have the spying program declared retroactively legal, more than a few people focused on the dispute scratched their heads.
NEWS
By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG AND DAVID E. SANGER and SHERYL GAY STOLBERG AND DAVID E. SANGER,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 20, 2006
After two months of insisting that President Bush did not need court approval to authorize wiretapping of calls between the United States and suspected terrorists abroad, the administration is trying to channel the political pressure for more oversight into retroactive congressional approval for the program. The administration opened negotiations with Congress last week, but it is far from clear whether Bush can get the votes he will need. The latest Republican to join the growing chorus of those seeking oversight is Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.
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