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By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
Daisy residents presented documents to the Zoning Board last night that they claimed were proof that planners of a %J proposed retreat center for people who care for the terminally ill had lied about the project.Presenting one document to the board, which gave instructions on how the farmhouse on the 32-acre parcel was to be decorated, neighbor Greta VanSusteren said it "completely undermines the credibility" of statments made by the Rev. Debbie Tate, Terrific's president and pastor of the Daisy United Methodist Church.
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By Jennifer Broadwater | February 1, 2011
In 1824, in the wake of the French Revolution, the sick and suffering in Paris found comfort from Catholic nuns who nursed them through their pain. Those nurses were the 12 founding members of the Sisters of Bon Secours, or, translated from French, the Sisters of Good Help. Some 180 years later, thousands still turn to the Sisters for help with everything from the dejection of unemployment to the stresses of being a caregiver, to receiving direction and inspiration in life's journey.
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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | December 20, 1993
A Mount Airy man wants to operate a retreat and conference center for corporate, religious and educational groups on his property on West Falls Road.James J. Sweet has proposed opening a center at West Falls Farmstead in the 5600 block of West Falls Road for "occasional" retreats. West Falls Road is a half-mile west of Route 27 near Buffalo Road."I live out there. I don't want events going on out there every weekend," he said.Half the 22-acre property is woodland. The land, which is zoned for conservation, also has a 1,500-square-foot pavilion and two ponds.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
Belmont, the 18th-century Elkridge estate on 68 acres operated as a conference center and education lab by Howard Community College, will close at year's end, costing six people their jobs, college officials announced Thursday. The secluded, pale yellow house surrounded by Patapsco State Park was built in 1738 as a wedding gift for the son of Caleb Dorsey. It has been a source of controversy since 2004, when the community college foundation bought it for $5.2 million. The property, along with an adjacent 13 acres and a house, have been up for sale since August 2009, but with no buyer in sight, college officials said business at Belmont has declined so much that they must close it. "When you look ahead at the bookings we had, there wasn't much," said college President Kate Hetherington.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | November 3, 1993
A group that cares for the terminally ill last night won approval from the Howard County Board of Appeals to operate a retreat center for caregivers on a farm in Daisy.The board placed strict conditions on the special exception to zoning regulations it granted Washington-based Terrific Inc., including limiting retreats to two weeks a month and participants to eight.Terrific -- Temporary Emergency Residential Resource Institute for Families in Crisis -- is a private, nonprofit group that provides housing and services for terminally ill inner-city children, the elderly and the disabled.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | September 2, 1993
The Howard County Planning Board is to hear testimony this morning on whether a Daisy property can be used as a retreat for people who care for the terminally ill.Terrific Inc. -- Temporary Emergency Residential Resource Institute for Families in Crisis -- is seeking a special exception to allow it to operate a retreat center on a 32-acre parcel on Ed Warfield Road.The private, nonprofit organization provides housing and services for terminally ill inner-city children,the elderly and the disabled.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
The Board of Zoning Appeals has approved the use of a Millers home for a spiritual retreat center run by three Catholic nuns.At a hearing yesterday in Westminster, the three-member zoning appeals board unanimously decided that the proposed center on 3.2 acres at 4800 Hoffmanville Road would have "no adverse effects on the neighborhood."The board granted variances to the minimum required lot area of 5 acres and 100-foot setback from adjoining properties. The nearest residence is about 80 feet from the property line.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
Two sisters who wish to operate a retreat in Daisy for people who care for the terminally ill spent more than two hours defending their program to the county Board of Appeals last night."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | September 3, 1993
The Howard County Planning Board yesterday sided with rural residents opposed to using a Daisy home as a retreat center for people who care for critically ill, inner-city children.It voted 3-1 to recommend to the county Board of Appeals that Terrific, a Washington, D.C., organization that provides housing and services in the inner city for the elderly, the disabled, and critically and terminally ill children, not be allowed to use the 32-acre farm site as a retreat center.The county Department of Planning and Zoning came to the opposite conclusion Aug. 27.It said Terrific -- Temporary Emergency Residential Resource Institute for Families in Crisis -- should be granted a special exception in the zoning regulations that would allow it to operate a retreat center, provided it met certain conditions.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | December 7, 2007
Loyola College, which has been locked in a lengthy dispute over its proposal for a retreat center in northern Baltimore County, should receive approval for the project, the state Court of Special Appeals decided this week. The ruling reverses a decision by a Baltimore County Circuit Court judge, who sided with Parkton-area residents opposed to building the retreat center in an area designated for agriculture. A lawyer for the group that objects to the retreat center said he will ask the state's highest court to review the appellate decision, which was issued Wednesday.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | April 8, 2009
Every spring, Susan Schnerb and her husband leave New York City for a food-centric week in, of all places, Reisterstown. The couple swears the meals are so delicious and so modern at the Pearlstone Conference and Retreat Center, they almost forget it's Passover, which begins Wednesday night - a beloved Jewish holiday but, with its ban on things like leavened bread, cake and pasta, not one widely praised for haute cuisine. "You always hear, 'It's Passover, and I can't have this and I can't have that,' " says Schnerb, a Baltimore native.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun reporter | February 8, 2008
WALKERSVILLE -- The Board of Zoning Appeals of this Frederick County town turned down last night a request by a Muslim group to put a mosque and retreat center on 224 acres of farmland. Though the request has raised issues of religious freedom and tolerance, the board mentioned much more mundane reasons -- problems with traffic and water and the details of the town's master plan and wording of its zoning regulations. The decision came on the third night of the board's public deliberation on the second floor of Walkerville's Town Hall, an event that attracted about 100 residents each night.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | December 7, 2007
Loyola College, which has been locked in a lengthy dispute over its proposal for a retreat center in northern Baltimore County, should receive approval for the project, the state Court of Special Appeals decided this week. The ruling reverses a decision by a Baltimore County Circuit Court judge, who sided with Parkton-area residents opposed to building the retreat center in an area designated for agriculture. A lawyer for the group that objects to the retreat center said he will ask the state's highest court to review the appellate decision, which was issued Wednesday.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | July 29, 2007
AT FIRST, JULIAN FORTH, A DIVINITY student at Duke University, didn't think he could squeeze in an overnight stay at Dayspring Retreat Center. An intern at both a Washington, D.C., hospice and a church coffeehouse, Forth also had two papers and a sermon to complete. Upon further thought, he realized he had no choice. If he wanted to give every task his best effort, Forth had to visit Dayspring, where for 24 hours, he could settle his mind.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,sun reporter | February 8, 2007
Arguing that a retreat center proposed by Loyola College would have little effect on its rural northern Baltimore County neighbors, lawyers for the college asked the Court of Special Appeals yesterday to uphold county approval of the project. "Because this use has such a light impact, it ought to be approved," James A. Dunbar, one of Loyola College's lawyers, argued yesterday before a panel of three appellate judges in Annapolis. But some Parkton-area residents remain opposed to the college's plans to build a lodge and two dormitories on a 10-acre portion of a 53-acre property in Parkton.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | April 21, 2006
A Baltimore County Circuit judge heard the highlights yesterday of the conflict between Loyola College, which wants to build a spiritual retreat center in a northern Baltimore County area zoned for agriculture, and residents opposed to the plan. Judge Ruth A. Jakubowski said she doesn't expect her decision to be the last one in the dispute, which began more than two years ago. Neither do those involved in the case. "This will completely upset a way of life," Lynne Jones, a spokeswoman for Citizens Against Loyola's Multi-use Center, said in explaining why the stakes are so high.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | August 17, 1993
Daisy resident Frances Kohl is keenly aware of the irony of her situation -- leading the opposition against a cause she would ordinarily support.An associate professor in the department of special education at the University of Maryland in College Park, she will attend a Planning Board hearing Thursday morning to oppose the use of the house and property next to her home as a place of respite for inner-city people who care for the terminally ill."What Terrific does in Washington, D.C., is fantastic," Ms. Kohl said.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
A Baltimore County appeals panel voted yesterday to allow Loyola College to build a spiritual retreat center in the northern area of the county. The three members of the county Board of Appeals present at a meeting yesterday voted unanimously to grant a zoning exception that would allow the college to build a four-building complex on 53 acres in Parkton designated for agriculture. Opponents of the plan said they are considering an appeal of the board's decision to the county's Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
A Baltimore County appeals panel voted yesterday to allow Loyola College to build a spiritual retreat center in the northern area of the county. The three members of the county Board of Appeals present at a meeting yesterday voted unanimously to grant a zoning exception that would allow the college to build a four-building complex on 53 acres in Parkton designated for agriculture. Opponents of the plan said they are considering an appeal of the board's decision to the county's Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2004
Baltimore County's zoning commissioner ruled yesterday that Loyola College can proceed with plans to build a spiritual retreat center on 53 acres of forest and farmland in northern Baltimore County, despite the objections of some neighbors who worry the facility will ruin the rural character of their community. In granting the Baltimore college's request for an exception to build on land zoned for agricultural use, Commissioner Lawrence E. Schmidt determined that the retreat center would be similar to a camp, a land use allowed as a "special exception" under the county's zoning regulations.
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