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NEWS
March 8, 1992
We're not surprised Annapolis legislators are questioning the state's chief retraining effort, Partnership for Workforce Quality. It was set up two years ago to help companies stay ahead of the human resource development curve so crucial to success in an increasingly global marketplace. The idea was to identify and pay for retraining by matching corporate dollars with state grants. Trouble is, far too many of those grants have gone to the wrong beneficiaries.State money went to Lever Brothers Co., a huge personal products manufacturer; to a five-store fast-food operation, and to a local investment banking firm.
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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
One night in 1999, a rash of frightening sensations hit Paul Titus all at once. His left arm went numb. His left eye began twitching. He couldn't speak without slurring. Unaware what the symptoms meant, he was slow to call for help. When his ischemic stroke was finally over, he was paralyzed on his left side and for 14 years he needed a leg brace and cane just to stay upright. One morning last week, Titus smiled as he loped along on a treadmill in a makeshift gym. A high-tech, brace-like device wrapped his left ankle, monitoring his gait 200 times per second and supplying energy boosts as needed.
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NEWS
By REG MURPHY | January 8, 1993
A chief executive officer surrounded by a world of technological change convenes a meeting of his direct subordinates. He warns them that their company must undergo drastic and immediate change. He challenges them to help cut costs, reorient the company and boost profits -- all while acting in a humane way.''I think we should start by conducting a big worker-retraining program,'' one of his vice presidents says. ''We need to phase out two whole departments where the technology really is ready to do the work.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Hundreds of workers laid off from the Sparrows Point steel mill will receive job retraining and other services under a $3 million U.S. Department of Labor grant announced Monday. The funding will expand job-related services under the National Emergency Grant program to 885 workers affected by the closure. Mill owner RG Steel LLC, which filed for bankruptcy protection in May, is in the midst of laying off nearly 2,000 workers, almost all of its workforce at Sparrows Point. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, who had pushed for the grant along with Sen. Ben Cardin, called the funding "a critical lifeline" for the workers.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- An internal Labor Department report says the government job training program for workers hurt by foreign trade is largely ineffective and used primarily as an income crutch for the unemployed.The $200 million program, one of the biggest and most generous for unemployed Americans, was intended to help laid-off manufacturing workers who could show that imports cost them their jobs. They were to be retrained in computer operation, nursing, accounting and such trades as welding and air conditioning repair.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | December 22, 1991
Change is nothing new in the life of Karel Matejovsky, who escaped from the Iron Curtain of his native Czechoslovakia to Switzerland two decades ago, then relocated with his U.S. wife to Maryland six years ago.The challenges of a new environment, a new language, were accepted with the same fierce determination that made him a champion long-distance runner in Europe.When he lost his job in March as a newspaper design coordinator with Patuxent Publishing Co. in Towson, Mr. Matejovsky, 49, saw that he desperately needed to relearn his occupation, to master the rapidly changing world of computer-aided design.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Putting on his "moon suit" during a make-believe chemical disaster was only part of the fun for Gary Remson when he took an eight-week course on handling hazardous materials last year at West Los Angeles College.The teaching seemed first-rate. Experts from the police and fire departments sat in as guest speakers. But most important of all, the laid-off aerospace worker looked forward to his prize "at the end of the rainbow" -- a job with a future."They were telling us, 'You'll finish up class on Friday, and you'll have three or four companies waiting on Monday to pick you up,' " the displaced Hughes Aircraft employee said of the government-funded program.
NEWS
May 7, 1992
The New Community College of Baltimore will host the Senior Power Job Fair on Friday, May 29. The fair is designed to help older adults explore job market prospects and to secure employment. The Job Fair will be held at New CCB's Harbor Campus, Bard Building, 600 E. Lombard St., 9 a.m.-1 p.m.The fair provides employers with opportunities to hire experienced job candidates.Fifty employers representing banks, hotels, fast-food outlets, retail stores, security agencies, janitorial services and temporary employment agencies will participate.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | August 25, 1991
After four years as a laborer for a local home building company, Ellen Cutsail lost her job. The layoff meant the 31-year-old Union Bridge resident and mother of two needed retraining to find work again.For help, she turned to the county's Job Training Partnership Act office.Counselors at the office recommended that she take 18 weeks of clerical-skills classes at Carroll Community College. She did, and JTPApaid for them."The JTPA staff are 'people' people," Cutsail said. "They were interested in what we were doing and willing to help us.That made a big difference."
NEWS
By Stacey Evers and Stacey Evers,States News Service | May 1, 1991
Job retraining funds grantedWASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Labor is granting $700,000 to Maryland to help retrain and relocate employees who have been dislocated by recent Defense Department cutbacks, according to Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., and Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, R-Md.The grant, which will provide job counseling, job search assistance and retraining, is expected to help 800 employees from Westinghouse Electric Corp. in Hunt Valley and at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, Litton's Amecom Division in College Park, and Bendix Corp.
NEWS
By Hilda L. Solis | September 11, 2011
"When I grow up, I want to be a supply chain analyst. " You don't hear these words too often - but I'm hoping that changes fast. When I was a child, my siblings and I would sit around the kitchen table and tell our parents about the jobs we might hold as adults. My mother bought me a bag with bandages and a toy thermometer; I wanted to be a nurse. Radiologic technologist, debit card specialist and, yes, supply chain analyst just weren't common terms back then. But today these jobs - and thousands more - are providing opportunities and hope to people entering or re-entering the workforce.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | September 5, 2009
Baltimore police officers who ordered several peace protesters to disperse Friday from a city park across from the Inner Harbor "were clearly wrong" and "uneducated on public demonstration laws," according to the Police Department's chief spokesman. That official, Anthony Guglielmi, said the five women had a legal right to protest at McKeldin Park, a triangular median bordered by Calvert, Light and Pratt streets. He said Maj. Dennis Smith, the commander of the Central District, has ordered the officers "to be retrained."
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | August 16, 2009
Kathy Lilley sees her academic counseling office at the Community College of Baltimore County as almost like the front desk in a hospital emergency room. A middle-age truck driver looking to become an apprentice electrician might be followed by a 20-year-old unsure how to translate academic skills into a paying career. No matter what the problem, Lilley's staff tries to find a solution within the college's catalog of courses and job-training programs. With the recession wiping out thousands of careers, their advice has never been more in demand.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
No question, the job market is grim. With employers continuing to lay off workers in droves, the national unemployment rate climbed to 8.9 percent in April. But job seekers are finding some hiring bright spots amid the drumbeat of discouraging news. Industries such as education, health care and the federal government are adding jobs nationally and in Maryland. And there are signs that hiring activity is picking up in the Baltimore region, employers and recruiters say. Howard County General Hospital is looking to hire 220 health care professionals, including 140 medical nurses, patient care technicians, secretaries and other support staff for its new patient pavilion that's scheduled to open in August.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | March 30, 2009
After Norris Turner's stroke a decade ago, he would tuck his right arm into his pocket to get the nearly useless limb out of the way. Now the 68-year-old grandfather from Columbia can use the arm to play catch with his grandson and hit a golf ball nearly 100 feet. Turner's progress has made him something of a poster child for a machine called the Tailwind. It's licensed and for sale by researchers from the University of Maryland who invented it and a local entrepreneur who believed it could help patients like Turner.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | May 18, 2008
On a cold, rainy day last month, 36 Baltimore police officers who normally patrol the Northern District sat behind classroom desks on a Sykesville campus, learning how to become the Complete Officer. The lecturer, Eric Greitens, was a former Navy SEAL who led missions in Fallujah, Iraq, to hunt down insurgents. The city officers copied down four phrases he wrote on a white board: No worse enemy. No better friend. No better diplomat. No better role model. Those words, Greitens said, are meant to remind officers that if they want to win a crime war, they will need the help and respect of the people they serve.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | March 9, 1992
Louisville, Kentucky -- Here's a community, in the midst of a biting national recession, that thinks it's fixed some of its bad old habits and found a way to keep its head above water -- maybe even grow some.Reversing a dramatic loss in manufacturing jobs in the early '80s, the Louisville market area in the last five years has been gaining an average of 10,000 jobs a year. Residents' real earnings have grown 9 percent in the last three years.In the mid-'70s there was public uproar over school busing; in the early '80s, Louisville got dubbed ''Strike City'' for its contentious labor relations.
NEWS
By Charles Murray | January 11, 1993
PRESIDENT-ELECT Bill Clinton is right to make education a top priority.He is wrong in his understanding of what needs fixing.Not one of his main educational policies -- increased loan assistance for college students, national educational standards linked to federal aid and more job retraining -- addresses the problems we are facing.Here are some propositions that Mr. Clinton and Richard W. Riley, his nominee for secretary of education, should look into:* Giving qualified students a chance at college is something we already do well.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 5, 2004
MILWAUKEE, Wis. - Douglas Konecny loved everything about manufacturing. He loved the roar of the machines and the hum of the factory walls. The vibrations. The smells. Even the feel of the fans blowing against his damp skin on midsummer days when it was 10 degrees hotter inside the seven-story building than outside. He could tell when things were going right and when they were going wrong. Even when he wasn't there. "You actually feel it like your own blood pumping," Konecny, 49, says of the work that gave him satisfaction and a comfortable, middle-class life for nearly 30 years.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 29, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Army National Guard, its military police force stretched thin and its skills badly needed in Iraq and elsewhere, is preparing to retrain some 2,000 of its seldom-used artillery soldiers as MPs, Pentagon officials said. About 1,200 soldiers from five National Guard artillery units are expected to be retrained between this fall and early spring, while plans are under way to eventually turn an additional 800 Guard artillerymen into MPs. "We want to have them ready as soon as possible," said a senior Defense Department official, who outlined the program and requested anonymity.
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