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By Matt Vensel | August 10, 2011
Each morning, Monday through Friday, I'll hook you up with reading material to skim through as you slug down coffee and slack off at the start of your workday -- that way I'll have an excuse to do the same at the start of mine.   Running it back: Ray Lewis may retire if the Ravens win a Super Bowl this season . ... Joe Flacco is scheduled to play the first quarter of the Ravens' preseason opener at the Eagles on Thursday night, and rookie Tyrod Taylor will get most of the playing time after that . ... Domonique Foxworth, who is trying to make a comeback from a torn ACL, could miss the preseason opener . ... Cal Ripken Jr. acknowledged again Tuesday that he has an " itch to come back to the big league scene . " ... Buck Showalter got ejected in the Orioles' 4-3 loss to the White Sox on Tuesday.
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NEWS
July 14, 2014
Regarding your article "Police, fire unions oppose mayor's new pension plan" (July 8), why do these two groups of public service employees think they are better than the tax payers of Maryland? What other employer lets it's employees retire after 20 years of service and pays for their pensions and health care for the rest of their lives? I know several retired policemen who receive their pensions and now work for the Department of Homeland Security, from which they will collect another pension paid for by taxpayers.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
The U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday that it sued the former CEO of Baltimore Behavioral Health Inc. for failing to deposit workers' contributions into the company's retirement plan. Baltimore Behavioral Health, or BBH, is a drug treatment and mental health clinic on West Pratt Street that filed for bankruptcy protection from its creditors last year. It also was the subject of a 2010 investigation by The Baltimore Sun, which uncovered unusually high Medicaid billings and steep salaries among the family members who at the time controlled the Baltimore nonprofit.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Thursday said he supports a bill that would give workers whose employers don't provide pension plans or 401ks easy access to retirement accounts. The support came as a Senate committee held a hearing on a bill by Sen. James Rosapepe, a Prince George's Democrat, that would require employers with more than five employees to either provide retirement plans or let workers have contributions to accounts automatically deducted from their paychecks. A companion bill sponsored by Del. Tom Hucker is pending in the House.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Robert Larkin's association with Oak Crest retirement community in Parkville began long before he and his wife purchased a condo there in 2001. The 86-year-old retired Baltimore City police major had contacts with Oak Crest before it even opened its doors. "I used to walk over here from Perry Hall during construction," Larkin said. "I'd wear my hard hat, [and] I got to know all the workers. That was in 1994. " There was never any doubt that the he and his wife, Gloria, would move into Oak Crest when they felt the time was right.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
The U.S. Department of Labor has opened an inquiry into the employee retirement plan of a taxpayer-funded mental health clinic in Baltimore after former workers said money deducted from their paychecks as far back as 2009 never reached their retirement plan accounts. The government has instructed Baltimore Behavioral Health Inc. to provide an array of documentation related to its retirement plan, according to two certified letters obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The federal inquiry began around two weeks after The Sun reported Dec. 10 that two former employees at the nonprofit clinic had discovered unexplained shortfalls in their retirement accounts.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn | May 3, 1999
IF YOU'VE held several jobs during your working life, and they all provided a retirement plan, I hate to think about your paperwork. All the plans are probably trailing you, like a comet's tail.Reader Suzanne O'Keefe of Brooklyn, N.Y., writes that she has two 403(b) plans, from when she taught at graduate school; a third 403(b) from her current employer; a self-directed pension from her current employer, which lets her pick the mutual funds; a 457 plan from the City of New York; and an individual retirement account.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Tribune Media Services | December 30, 2007
The ball is about to drop on 2008. Is your retirement plan where it should be? Whether you're 20 and starting to save or already managing a sizable nest egg, next year could be an important one for your long-term money. There'll be an election of a new president, who could try to change taxes or Social Security policy. Blink, and you might find your employer shuffling you into a new savings plan. Retirement experts offered some advice for navigating the coming year: Get going. You have until April 15 to make your 2007 individual retirement account contribution (up to $4,000, or $5,000 if you're 50 and up)
NEWS
July 10, 1997
The Board of Public Works postponed its scheduled vote yesterday on a contract to administer the supplemental retirement plan for state workers.Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein and Treasurer Richard N. Dixon asked that the vote be postponed so that a clause could be added to the contract requiring that annual reports be provided to the board.The contract is expected to be awarded to PEBSCO, which has managed the private retirement savings accounts of state workers for more than two decades.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 5, 1997
Ideas on where to put -- or not put -- your money, some from offbeat publications you won't find on newsstands."MAX OUT": "Maximize contributions to your company's retirement plan, such as 401(k). We hope you realize that Social Security won't meet all of your retirement needs. The tax-free investment growth and savings discipline inside your retirement plan are hard to beat. Also, consider the new Roth IRAs available next year." (Income Digest)CAVEAT EMPTOR: "There is a 'string' to most investment propositions.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
The U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday that it sued the former CEO of Baltimore Behavioral Health Inc. for failing to deposit workers' contributions into the company's retirement plan. Baltimore Behavioral Health, or BBH, is a drug treatment and mental health clinic on West Pratt Street that filed for bankruptcy protection from its creditors last year. It also was the subject of a 2010 investigation by The Baltimore Sun, which uncovered unusually high Medicaid billings and steep salaries among the family members who at the time controlled the Baltimore nonprofit.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
The U.S. Department of Labor said Friday that it is suing a Columbia medical practice for allegedly failing to forward more than $100,000 in employee contributions and loan repayments to a 401(k) retirement plan. The agency said its Employee Benefits Security Administration found that Pulmonary Disease & Critical Care Associates, its owner, Dr. David O. Nyanjom, and practice administrator Laura Nyanjom did not remit $103,630 in payments between November 2006 and April 2012. Employees of the practice and of Patuxent Hospitalists participated in the plan, the agency said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
At an age when many workers are thinking about winding down their careers, Victoria Baldassano of Silver Spring says she can't afford to give retirement a thought. The part-time English professor at Montgomery College said her income has been too low for too long to save for retirement, and she's carrying about $40,000 in credit card debt racked up to pay living expenses. "It's an awkward situation to be in at 61," said Baldassano, who said she thinks more about day-to-day bills than retirement.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
The economy is improving and so is employment, but workers' optimism about a comfortable retirement has fallen to a new low, according to the annual Retirement Confidence Survey released Tuesday. Just over half of workers say they are either very confident about their retirement prospects or somewhat so. But 28 percent - a record high - have no confidence while an additional 21 percent express pessimism about their retirement future. The survey by the Employment Benefit Research Institute gauged the outlook on retirement among 1,254 U.S. workers and retirees interviewed in January.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
It's been a worry for many years: What happens when older federal workers retire and take decades of institutional knowledge with them? "The last thing any manager or any organization or company wants is for folks that are ready to retire to just walk out the door," said Kenneth J. Zawodny Jr., associate director of retirement services at the federal Office of Personnel Management. With the aging of the workforce, the challenge has grown urgent. More than 40 percent of federal employees in 2010 were 50 or older.
NEWS
August 12, 2012
Your recent editorial concerning public employee pensions and the transition to defined contribution plans ignores some significant principles ("Prudence and public pensions," July 20). Your opinion described "risk" as a "financial albatross. " Yet nowhere in the editorial was "trust" mentioned. As retired public school educators representing other retired Maryland educators, we find this to be a serious oversight. A defined benefit retirement plan, when well designed, managed and administered, strives to lower the "risk" by smoothing out the financial markets' gyrations over an extended period of time.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | August 27, 2006
Employers now have more reasons to feel comfortable about ditching their traditional pension plans for so-called cash balance plans. For years, there have been questions about whether switching to a cash balance plan discriminated against older workers, because conversions often have reduced the projected benefits for those workers. But the new federal pension bill signed into law this month essentially says newly created cash balance plans won't be age discriminatory if they meet certain criteria.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
Baltimore County school employees will be able to choose from among five retirement plan provider options, after an 8-0 school board vote last night. The five recommended vendors for 403(b) retirement plans are: AIG Retirement, ING Life Insurance & Annuity Co., Lincoln Financial Group, MetLife Resources and Security Financial Resources & Security Distributors Inc. It is expected that one will be selected as a third-party administrator, school officials said. Board member Valerie A. Roddy recused herself, citing a potential conflict of interest: Her husband's law firm represents one of the bidders.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Robert Larkin's association with Oak Crest retirement community in Parkville began long before he and his wife purchased a condo there in 2001. The 86-year-old retired Baltimore City police major had contacts with Oak Crest before it even opened its doors. "I used to walk over here from Perry Hall during construction," Larkin said. "I'd wear my hard hat, [and] I got to know all the workers. That was in 1994. " There was never any doubt that the he and his wife, Gloria, would move into Oak Crest when they felt the time was right.
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