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Retirement Party

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By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
The 15 students sitting across from Jewell Makolin wanted to learn math, but couldn't.She wanted to know why, and embarked on a 45-year career in special education that eventually brought her to lead the programs for Carroll County schools.During that time, she witnessed a revolution in her field.It wasn't until the late 1960s that educators began to identify and work with disorders that make learning difficult for otherwise intelligent people."It just confirmed what I had seen in a number of kids -- there was something that got in the way of learning," said Mrs. $H Makolin.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Baltimore isn't known as the City of Great Sports Billboards. But perhaps it should be. A taunting billboard that went up in January, shortly after the Ravens beat the Patriots in the AFC playoffs, was called the "Best Sports Billboard Ever" by columnist Jessica Isner of bleacherreport.com. The billboard, put up by Clear Channel Outdoor's DC/Baltimore branch on all 19 of its digital billboards in the city, proudly announced that Ray Lewis ' retirement party was being put off until Feb. 3 -- not coincidentally, the date of Super Bowl XLVII.
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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1995
Usually, they call him The Dean of the Baltimore City Council. Last night they called him wonderful, beneficent and a trailblazer. By next week, they will call him a memory. Third District Councilman Martin E. "Mike" Curran, after serving 18 years and nine months on the City Council, officially called it quits at his retirement party last night.Dozens of politicians from federal, state and city levels and friends shoehorned themselves into a small Canton cafe to wish The Dean a hearty farewell.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
For the first time in 16 years, the directors of the Baltimore Development Corp. met Thursday without M.J. "Jay" Brodie at the helm of the city's influential, quasi-public economic development arm. The BDC's acting president, Kimberly A. Clark, who has expressed interest in the open top job, briefed board members on several of the corporation's initiatives: •An expanded special tax zone for Under Armour Inc., a move that would allow the...
NEWS
August 11, 1991
Glen Burnie physician, Dr. Morton Krieger, was honored recently for his work in medicine at a retirement party. During his 40-year practice, he served the Brooklyn area.The party was organized by Krieger's patients at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie. More than 300people attended the tribute.In attendance was Del. Ray Huff, D-Pasadena, who presented Krieger with an award for his service to the community.Since retiring, Krieger and his wife, Sallye, have been traveling. Krieger also plansto write.
NEWS
By Beth Reinhard and Beth Reinhard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 23, 1996
When Phoebe Martin started working in the cafeteria at 5th District Elementary School in 1963, she would knead dough for fresh rolls, make hamburger patties and bake wonderful-smelling cinnamon buns.The students at the Upperco school, many of whom lived on farms and didn't know about pizza, favored hot roast beef sandwiches and peanut butter fudge.On Friday -- her last day at the Northwest Baltimore County school -- Martin nostalgically recalled the days before prepackaged pizzas and hamburgers were trucked to 5th District.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Baltimore isn't known as the City of Great Sports Billboards. But perhaps it should be. A taunting billboard that went up in January, shortly after the Ravens beat the Patriots in the AFC playoffs, was called the "Best Sports Billboard Ever" by columnist Jessica Isner of bleacherreport.com. The billboard, put up by Clear Channel Outdoor's DC/Baltimore branch on all 19 of its digital billboards in the city, proudly announced that Ray Lewis ' retirement party was being put off until Feb. 3 -- not coincidentally, the date of Super Bowl XLVII.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | August 12, 1991
Yevola Peters just can't seem to bring herself to retire.Peters,director of the county Community Action Agency since 1976 and an employee of the agency since 1969, will stay on another month.Peters, 56, first announced her retirement two years ago. She washonored at a party celebrating the agency's 20th birthday in October1989.When it came time to retire last year, she agreed to stay on until the agency's board of directors could find a new director. She figured that would take until June.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | February 14, 1994
At Jack D. Hesson's retirement party last month, one of his co-workers in the Westminster water department gave him a painting of a man whose keys and papers are scattering while he tries to extricate the seat of his pants from a dog's jaws."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 26, 2010
Mary Ann Gottschall, a registered nurse and instructor, died March 11 of cancer at St. Agnes Hospital, where she had worked for more than three decades. The Columbia resident was 65. Miss Gottschall, the daughter of an anthracite coal miner and a homemaker, was born and raised in Branchdale, Pa., and Muddy Creek, Pa. She was a 1962 graduate of Blessed Virgin Mary High School in Pottsville, Pa., and moved to Baltimore, where she graduated in 1968 from the Bon Secours Hospital School of Nursing.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 26, 2010
Mary Ann Gottschall, a registered nurse and instructor, died March 11 of cancer at St. Agnes Hospital, where she had worked for more than three decades. The Columbia resident was 65. Miss Gottschall, the daughter of an anthracite coal miner and a homemaker, was born and raised in Branchdale, Pa., and Muddy Creek, Pa. She was a 1962 graduate of Blessed Virgin Mary High School in Pottsville, Pa., and moved to Baltimore, where she graduated in 1968 from the Bon Secours Hospital School of Nursing.
NEWS
August 17, 2004
Henry Stern, a resident of Kings Contrivance, will hold a Retire George Bush Party at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 26 at the 50+ Center at the east Columbia library, where he is renting a meeting room for the event. "I organized and am paying for this rally, not the Democratic Party or the Kerry/Edwards campaign," Stern wrote in an e-mail. "I'm a naturalized citizen and I love the country, and I hate to see what's happening to it," he said later. "America was the dream of immigrants." Born in Rohrbach, Germany, Stern came to the United States in 1936.
FEATURES
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | July 8, 1998
As summer's warm weather and long days lead inexorably to parties, so parties lead to varying degrees of terror. Whether it's a bridal or baby shower, a graduation celebration, a retirement party, a first Communion or a confirmation, even a confident cook may quake at the prospect of preparing a meal for a small crowd.But giving a party needn't be a traumatic event. We've talked to a variety of party-givers to construct a master menu that's easy to prepare and designed to appeal to a broad range of guests.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1997
MANCHESTER THINKS SO HIGHLY of Dr. Wilbur Foard and pharmacist Henry Glaeser that it threw a big retirement party -- a thank-you celebration -- and invited the entire town.Nearly 200 friends and family packed the Manchester Fire Activities Building on Sunday for, as master of ceremonies Dean Minnich said, the "hand-clapping, hand-shaking celebration for two favorite citizens.""How many of you called Dr. Foard in the middle of the night? Were scared to death and got peace of mind?" he asked.
NEWS
By Beth Reinhard and Beth Reinhard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 23, 1996
When Phoebe Martin started working in the cafeteria at 5th District Elementary School in 1963, she would knead dough for fresh rolls, make hamburger patties and bake wonderful-smelling cinnamon buns.The students at the Upperco school, many of whom lived on farms and didn't know about pizza, favored hot roast beef sandwiches and peanut butter fudge.On Friday -- her last day at the Northwest Baltimore County school -- Martin nostalgically recalled the days before prepackaged pizzas and hamburgers were trucked to 5th District.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1995
Usually, they call him The Dean of the Baltimore City Council. Last night they called him wonderful, beneficent and a trailblazer. By next week, they will call him a memory. Third District Councilman Martin E. "Mike" Curran, after serving 18 years and nine months on the City Council, officially called it quits at his retirement party last night.Dozens of politicians from federal, state and city levels and friends shoehorned themselves into a small Canton cafe to wish The Dean a hearty farewell.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1997
MANCHESTER THINKS SO HIGHLY of Dr. Wilbur Foard and pharmacist Henry Glaeser that it threw a big retirement party -- a thank-you celebration -- and invited the entire town.Nearly 200 friends and family packed the Manchester Fire Activities Building on Sunday for, as master of ceremonies Dean Minnich said, the "hand-clapping, hand-shaking celebration for two favorite citizens.""How many of you called Dr. Foard in the middle of the night? Were scared to death and got peace of mind?" he asked.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
For the first time in 16 years, the directors of the Baltimore Development Corp. met Thursday without M.J. "Jay" Brodie at the helm of the city's influential, quasi-public economic development arm. The BDC's acting president, Kimberly A. Clark, who has expressed interest in the open top job, briefed board members on several of the corporation's initiatives: •An expanded special tax zone for Under Armour Inc., a move that would allow the...
NEWS
By DAVID SIMON | August 21, 1994
The lead role was played, appropriately enough, by a city homicide detective, a storied veteran of the crimes against persons section who donned a silver wig and a white dress shirt bedecked with gold stars and trim. Two other detectives marked his entrance onstage with bright beams from departmental-issue flashlights."Ladies and gentlemen," declared the master of ceremonies, a veteran lieutenant. "It's . . . it's . . ." The crowd of more than two hundred detectives, prosecutors and federal agents could no longer contain itself.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | February 14, 1994
At Jack D. Hesson's retirement party last month, one of his co-workers in the Westminster water department gave him a painting of a man whose keys and papers are scattering while he tries to extricate the seat of his pants from a dog's jaws."
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