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NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
Howard County Police Chief James N. Robey said yesterday that he and County Executive Charles I. Ecker are trying to revamp the county's retirement package, aiming to stem the tide of police officers who are leaving the county for other area departments."
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 16, 2014
These days, I find myself looking back on my father's work life with a mix of nostalgia and envy. He worked for 40 years for the same company and never worried that Alcoa would go out of business or that his industry would become obsolete. He had setbacks in his upward mobility, but he never worried about being laid off. He married, bought a house and raised four daughters. His ego was bruised when he was asked to retire early, but then soothed by the generous settlement and retirement package.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
Baltimore County officials have reached contract agreements that would allow sheriff's deputies to retire after 20 years and give 10 percent pay raises to correctional officers and police dispatchers.The retirement package was sought for years by deputies eager for the same 20-year retirement opportunity provided to county police officers, said Sgt. Michael Corrigan, union president."The retirement was a really big issue with us," Corrigan said.Corrigan said the contract would allow deputies to retire with 20 years of service after Dec. 31, 2002, instead of requiring 30 years of service to retire and collect 50 percent of their salary.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2012
After a 36-year career with the Postal Service, Yverne "Pat" Moore says she's living the life she started planning two decades ago, filled with church and community service, grandchildren and a trip to the other side of the world. The recently retired Ellicott City woman is part of a wave of workers who are leaving federal employment as baby boomers age out of the workforce and managers offer buyouts to help reduce spending. Those who have waited for the economy to stabilize are also now exiting.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
Emotions ran high last night as the Howard County Council began wrestling with a proposal to let police and firefighters retire in 20 years rather than 25.The council's Republican majority became frustrated with a shortage of financial details about the new retirement package -- approved by County Executive Charles I. Ecker, a fellow Republican -- and by the pressure to act on it quickly."
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1998
The Howard County Council last night approved raises for the next county executive and the council members who take office in December.Also last night, the council approved a beefed-up retirement package for all 328 county police officers -- including retiring Police Chief James N. Robey.In the vote on the new salaries, the council accepted the recommendation of the Compensation Review Commission, a group of seven citizens charged with proposing salaries.The new salaries will be $33,800 for each of the five part-time council members by the end of 2001.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker yesterday blessed a tentative agreement with the county firefighters union, one that would give it a beefed-up retirement package in exchange for scheduling concessions.The deal must be approved by the union membership and the County Council, but it offers the prospect of labor peace after months of negotiations and bitter political gamesmanship."That's great," said Council Chairman Dennis R. Schrader, after hearing of the settlement.He was a leading critic of a proposal to allow firefighters to retire after 20 years of service.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
The long and contentious battle over an improved retirement package for Howard County firefighters ended quietly with unanimous County Council approval Monday."
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | January 23, 1993
The interim chief executive officer of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland has asked Fred M. Gloth Jr., the company's veteran general counsel and No. 2 Blues officer over the past several years, to forestall his retirement and help run the insurer.Mr. Gloth, 67, is the last remaining member of the management team that operated under former chairman and chief executive Carl J. Sardegna.William A. Beasman Jr., who took over as Blues chief executive when Mr. Sardegna resigned in December, said he asked Mr. Gloth, who has been with the Blues for more than 40 years, to stay on because of his knowledge of the health insurer.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Ann LoLordo and Patricia Meisol and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writers | October 16, 1992
At a time when the reserves of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland had fallen to their lowest level ever, the insurer's board of directors set up a $1.7 million retirement fund for then-chairman Carl J. Sardegna.The Blues board unanimously approved the retirement package in March 1990, weeks after it had heard a review of the insurer's 1989 results. That year, the insurer's reserves declined to their lowest level ever, despite the Blues' first operating profit in several years.At the same time, the health insurer's administrative expenses rose to an unprecedented 13 percent of its revenues, among the highest for Blues plans nationwide, and its service to customers dropped drastically -- the backlog of unpaid claims more than doubled by the end of the year.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
Even as the Baltimore County Council weighs an employee buyout plan that could chop millions from next year's budget, officials are leaving open the possibility of layoffs and furloughs. Council members discussed the early retirement proposal at a meeting Tuesday at which administration officials told them it would save about $14 million each year. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz proposed the buyouts last month. The plan is intended to cut about 200 jobs from the county's workforce of 8,000.
NEWS
October 7, 2008
No one would argue that a college president who successfully leads an institution through a quarter-century of growth and development shouldn't enjoy a comfortable retirement. But that's not the same thing as the Wall Street-style golden parachute Morgan State University President Earl S. Richardson has negotiated for himself. After Mr. Richardson retires in 2009 from his $389,000-a-year job as president of one of the nation's oldest historically black colleges and universities, he'll remain on the school payroll, get an equally impressive office and collect $300,000 annually as president emeritus - even though his only duties will be to teach a couple of graduate courses a year.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Column | July 1, 2007
I retired 10 years ago at age 80. At that time, I had assets of $350,000. Now I am down to $157,771 in my portfolio. In it is $6,560 in cash; $39,773 in stocks and $111,438 in mutual funds. Is it wise to put this in CDs and money market accounts earning about 5 percent before the market starts dropping? - Gene John You indicated that your monthly income of about $4,800 is split roughly 50-50 between Social Security and portfolio withdrawals. Without knowing your wishes about leaving an inheritance or what types of mutual funds you hold, a financial planner with expertise in late-stage retirement planning offered some thoughts.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | April 3, 2007
County workers and the leaders of two of their unions packed a Baltimore County Council meeting yesterday to denounce a proposed change in retirement benefits, days before a deadline for the unions to sign labor contracts. Much of the criticism centered on the administration's proposal to force current employees with less than 30 years' service to work until age 65, rather than 60, to receive full retirement benefits. County officials say the change is needed to head off a financial crisis in coming years as more and more employees retire.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart | March 4, 2007
Companies are recruiting former workers back into the fold, another reason to think about your retirement benefits as you walk out, or back in, the door. Kirsten DaSilva, 35, spent the first eight years of her career as an auditor with accounting giant PricewaterhouseCoopers in Florham Park, N.J. She jumped ship for an opportunity to join a company that was going public, but the company later was acquired, and DaSilva wasn't happy in the new regime. So, last fall she went job hunting, on familiar turf.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Robert Little and Bill Atkinson and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
A top executive with Allied Irish Banks PLC denied yesterday a report that Allfirst Financial Inc., its Baltimore subsidiary, which lost $691.2 million in a currency trading scandal, will be sold before the end of the year. The weakened banking company is conducting a "strategic review" of its options, and officials confirmed yesterday that it plans to cut more than 300 employees by December. The executive, who requested anonymity, said no decisions have been made regarding the future of Allfirst, which has 6,000 employees and is the largest bank in the state with headquarters in Maryland.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1997
The push for 20-year retirement for Howard County police and firefighters is nearly dead, a victim of County Council Republicans wary of the costs and convinced that a tough stand will bring a better deal at the bargaining table.County Executive Charles I. Ecker, himself a Republican, yesterday called the new retirement package "a priority." But so far, he has not persuaded a single County Council Republican to join him -- a rare failure of political influence for Ecker."The county executive seems to be so popular in Howard County," said Democratic Councilman C. Vernon Gray, "and yet he does not seem that popular among the council Republicans."
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
County police have settled on a three-year contract that would allow officers with 20 years of service in the department to retire without financial penalty.The agreement, which was reached last week and put to a vote on Tuesday, came as a victory for the 470-member union. The retirement package puts the department in line with others in the Baltimore-Washington area."An overwhelming majority of officers voted for it," said Dennis Howell, vice president of the Fraternal Order of Police.Howell said the contract was heavily endorsed by police Chief Robert Russell, who helped push the deal through during 11th-hour discussions with County Executive Robert R. Neall and other administrators who had opposed removing the early retirement penalty.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2002
After awarding 27 promotions in the past two months, Howard County Police Chief Wayne Livesay should be feeling a bit like Ed McMahon of the American Family Publishers Sweepstakes. But Livesay said being the bearer of so much good news can have its drawbacks. "It's actually the most difficult, gut-wrenching thing I do as chief," he said of promotion decisions. "There are lot of good people who I can't promote because there's not enough room." Livesay said he remembers both feelings - being passed up for a promotion and being awarded one. The chief chooses the officers to be promoted from a list of the top 10 candidates generated by their assessment test scores.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2000
It's never too late to set goals and start saving for retirement, even for people who didn't give it a thought for the first 20 or 30 years of working life, according to financial planning experts. Many joined the company 401(k) or socked away money in stocks or savings by the time they were in their 40s and 50s, but some haven't because they've changed jobs, been hit with large bills or for other reasons, they said. And of those who have saved, many don't have a plan. Now's the time to get serious about retirement, the experts said.
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