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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
A new solar array built for a Baltimore County retirement community is among the metro area's largest, the installation firm said Tuesday. ABM Industries installed the 1.2 megawatt array on land owned by the Glen Meadows Retirement Community in Glen Arm. Washington Gas Energy Systems owns the 4,150-panel solar system and will sell the power it produces to Glen Meadows. Solar power accounts for a small percentage of Maryland electricity generation, but the number of arrays in the state are expanding quickly.
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NEWS
September 22, 2014
A groundbreaking ceremony was held on Sept. 15 for Chapel Springs, a new senior community to be built behind the Safeway at the Perry Hall Marketplace Shopping Center. The project includes 127 one- and two-bedroom apartments with a range of affordable units.   Tenants will be seniors aged 62 years and older.  The $23 million project will include a multipurpose community room, health suite, billiards and game room, internet cafe, fitness room, beauty salon, outdoor patio and dog park.
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EXPLORE
July 19, 2012
Erickson Living named Clara Parker executive director of Charlestown, the continuing care retirement community in Catonsville. The Severna Park resident will be responsible for daily operations on the 110-acre campus on Maiden Choice Lane, where more than 2,000 residents are served by 1,100 employees. Parker had worked as vice president-regional finance director for Erickson Living communities throughout the country. In 2005, she was named director of finance at Oak Crest.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
It is unfortunate that the people who are living in Mays Chapel North did not investigate what was going to be built on the empty lot across from the community ( "Mays Chapel seniors dread opening day of school," Aug. 14). Baltimore County schools had this site for many years. When my son was in elementary school, I thought he would finish elementary school at the new school. He is now 30 years old. Perhaps the people who built Mays Chapel North did not disclose the future of the site to people buying there.
EXPLORE
July 13, 2012
In response to the article, "Columbia couple, both 100, still going strong" (July 5): Thank you for your recognition of two of our prominent residents, John and Ruby Hill, who have recently turned 100 together. We noticed with dismay that the headline and article call Vantage House an assisted living center. In point of fact, Vantage House is a continuing care retirement community, or CCRC — the only one in Howard County. CCRCs provide a full continuum of care, from independent living apartments, to enhanced living, assisted living, and skilled nursing care.
BUSINESS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
If it wasn't for the large, well-equipped woodworking shop at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville, Lawrence Schneider might never have embarked upon his third career as a sculptor. But when Schneider moved into the Hunt Valley community 10 years ago, he found an extensive studio for residents featuring a top-notch table saw, a large lathe and a floor-to-ceiling vacuum to suck up the dust. He also discovered his longtime hobby had aesthetic merit. "Previously, I never thought of what I was doing as art," the 79-year-old said.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | July 9, 2014
The developers of a new retirement community in Ellicott City are to break ground Thursday, nearly 10 years after their organization was given the land for the site. The Lutheran Village at Miller's Grant could house 400 people upon completion, expected in 2015. The $140 million development takes its name from the family of Charles E. Miller and his son Paul, which gave the Frederick Road land in 2005 to Carroll Lutheran Village, a Westminster-based organization that started a retirement community in 1977 and today serves about 700 people in 400 homes.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
When letter writer Susan Brown turns 75, sells her family home and moves to a quiet retirement area, she will be better equipped to opine whether or not she thinks a 700-seat elementary school is appropriate in her backyard ("Mays Chapel school would be an asset to the area," March 11). If she is like the several thousand people who actually live here and have signed the petition to stop the building, she quite possibly would even join our protest. The planned unit development to which she refers was signed many years ago, before Mays Chapel North became an area to retire to after you sold your family home.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Strange though it may seem to say out loud, just about everyone in Harford County is the beneficiary of a residential developer. Be it Howard Park, one of the county's oldest neighborhoods, or Bulle Rock in Havre de Grace, one of its newest, the places where most houses are - and where most people live - are there because of residential land developers. In Harford County, as is the case in many suburban communities, the dynamic is such that people have been attracted because of the relative seclusion, which then attracts another wave of potential buyers, which results in more development, making the place less secluded and generally irritating the people who came for the initial level of seclusion.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Nick Markakis, Adam Jones and the other Orioles get four months off between baseball seasons. Joe Flacco, Ray Rice and the world champion Ravens have five months to go before training camp begins. Big-time athletes, after all, need a chance to rest their bodies and minds after the rigors of a long campaign. Then there are the white-clad competitors at Ginger Cove. "We don't want an off-season. We like to keep our skills sharp," says Bill Krause, the 91-year-old Imperial Wicket, or captain, of the croquet club at the retirement community in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan told residents of a retirement community Tuesday night that he wants to eliminate all state income taxes on pensions before the end of his administration. Hogan unveiled the proposal in response to a question from a resident, one of about 500 people who attended a gubernatorial forum at Charlestown in Baltimore County, where the GOP nominee and Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown spoke. Both men struck familiar themes for most of the evening until Hogan told the seniors that after he cut spending and got the economy under control, his priority would be to slash the taxes they pay. His promise earned him the loudest applause of the night for either candidate.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
The redevelopment of a former Army post in the Blue Ridge Mountains might not appear to have much in common with the renovation of the historic Hippodrome Theatre on Baltimore's west side. Spanning roughly 600 acres in Western Maryland's Washington County, Fort Ritchie envelops two small lakes and is speckled with spruce trees and gray stone buildings dating to the 1920s. It's hardly a theater in a gritty part of downtown. But like the Hippodrome , the installation presents a daunting set of questions - multiple stakeholders with competing interests, historic considerations, a difficult location.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | July 9, 2014
The developers of a new retirement community in Ellicott City are to break ground Thursday, nearly 10 years after their organization was given the land for the site. The Lutheran Village at Miller's Grant could house 400 people upon completion, expected in 2015. The $140 million development takes its name from the family of Charles E. Miller and his son Paul, which gave the Frederick Road land in 2005 to Carroll Lutheran Village, a Westminster-based organization that started a retirement community in 1977 and today serves about 700 people in 400 homes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Florence H. Deitz, a Randallstown community activist who was a founder in the 1960s of the old Baltimore County General Hospital, which later became Northwest Hospital, died Monday of cancer at the Fairhaven retirement community. She was 91. "Florence was a truly classic woman. She was gracious and exceptionally talented," said Gene Friedman, who was chairman in 1968 of the Baltimore County General Hospital Foundation. "She was always well-dressed, available to talk, and spoke beautifully," said Mr. Friedman.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
Cynthia L. "Cindy" Howl, a retired registered nurse and a lifelong Green Bay Packers fan, died May 23 of complications from diabetes at her Broadmead retirement community home in Cockeysville. She was 54. The daughter of Paul Peterson, who had been medical administrator at Eisenhower Medical Center in Palm Springs, Calif., and Sharon Peterson, a homemaker, Cynthia Lee Peterson was born in Milwaukee and moved to Palm Springs when she was a teenager. She graduated in 1977 from Palm Springs High School and earned her bachelor's degree in 1986 from the University of Minnesota School of Nursing.
BUSINESS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
If it wasn't for the large, well-equipped woodworking shop at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville, Lawrence Schneider might never have embarked upon his third career as a sculptor. But when Schneider moved into the Hunt Valley community 10 years ago, he found an extensive studio for residents featuring a top-notch table saw, a large lathe and a floor-to-ceiling vacuum to suck up the dust. He also discovered his longtime hobby had aesthetic merit. "Previously, I never thought of what I was doing as art," the 79-year-old said.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | September 5, 1993
Strong opposition by Green Spring Valley residents and Baltimore County officials has forced the Charlestown Retirement Community to abandon plans to build a senior citizens housing development on the edge of the valley.Paul L. Erickson, general counsel for Charlestown, said that company officials decided 10 days ago to drop their effort to have public water and sewerage extended west of Falls Road to service the proposed 2,500-resident development at Falls and Greenspring Valley roads. A letter to that effect was sent to P. David Fields, county planning director.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | December 13, 1994
Anne Arundel County officials announced yesterday a partnership with a Severna Park nonprofit organization that will provide affordable housing for about 160 elderly people.Under the arrangement, the county is donating 10 acres near Cypress Creek Road and Ritchie Highway to Woodswise, a nonprofit group formed by Woods Memorial Presbyterian Church. The group will lease the land to a private corporation, which will build and operate the $10 million retirement community."Woodswise is acting almost as a trustee for the county," said Ardath Cade, the county's human services officer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
The Rev. Gerald W. "Jerry" Weiss, a pastor of United Methodist churches in Maryland who enjoyed collecting and repairing antique clocks, died April 6 of heart failure at the Charlestown retirement community. He was 84. "His use by God went beyond local churches," said the Rev. James H. Farmer, pastor of Severna Park United Methodist Church. "Jerry's life was a gift to the church and as a pastor of God. " The son of a United Methodist minister and a homemaker, Gerald William Weiss was born and raised in Ashley, Ill., and later moved to Albion, Ill., where he graduated in 1947 from Albion Community High School.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Virginia B. "Ginnie" Bryant, a homemaker and former Roland Park activist, died Feb. 4 of heart failure at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. She was 90. Virginia Bowen was born in Baltimore and raised in Hampden and Mechanicsburg, N.J. She later returned to Baltimore and graduated in 1941 from Eastern High School. She also attended Bard Avon School, a Baltimore business and secretarial school. In 1950, she married Raymond G. Bryant, and the couple settled on St. George's Road in the North Baltimore community The Orchards.
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