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By Los Angeles Times Evening Sun reporter Lan Nguyen contributed to this article | December 17, 1991
RESEARCHERS HAVE identified what they think is the last piece of the genetic puzzle of a major form of retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited disorder that has produced blindness in about 100,000 Americans and 1.5 million people worldwide.The discovery should make possible prenatal screening for the disorders in families with "autosomal dominant" retinitis pigmentosa, which accounts for about 43 percent of all cases of the disorder, said geneticist Jeanette S. Felix, director of science for the Baltimore-based National Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation.
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By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2000
JEFF CLEVELAND IS certainly not one to run away from a problem. Instead, he runs for a solution. The Ellicott City resident and his 9-year-old daughter, Megan, have been diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an eye disease that causes degeneration of the retina and can lead to blindness. The condition is hereditary; Cleveland's father and grandfather suffered from RP and experienced progressive loss of vision. His grandfather eventually became legally blind. So far, Cleveland has experienced only slight visual impairment, and Megan, a fourth-grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, has suffered no significant loss of vision.
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By Chicago Tribune | June 15, 1993
Adults suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a group of inherited diseases that may cause blindness, can slow their loss of vision by taking a daily supplements of vitamin A and avoiding high doses of vitamin E, it was reported yesterday by Harvard University researchers.The $5-million study provides the first useful treatment for retinitis pigmentosa, which afflicts 100,000 Americans. The disease gradually destroys vision cells in the retina at the back of the eye.Patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa generally report night blindness in adolescence and lose peripheral and finally central vision as they age, typically going completely blind between 50 and 80.Adult patients in the study who supplemented their daily diets with 15,000 International Units of vitamin A had, on average, a 20 percent slower annual decline of remaining retinal function than those not taking the high dose, according to Dr. Eliot L. Berson, the study's principle investigator.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1996
If the blind are ever made to see, they might recall with fascination the days when pioneering surgeons inserted electric probes into the eyes of human volunteers and, for an instant, illuminated the dark.Such experiments, now in progress at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, may be the rudimentary beginnings of a technology that will enable people blinded by the loss of light-sensing nerve cells to navigate without canes or guide dogs.Though the achievement may be years away, Wilmer scientists believe they are on a path toward an electronic implant that would complete circuits destroyed by retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease that afflicts about 100,000 people in the United States.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1996
Bernard "Ben" Berman, a Baltimore real estate developer who was internationally known for his efforts to fight blindness, died Friday in a Pikesville automobile accident. He was 72.Mr. Berman founded the Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation -- an organization dedicated to curing the disease that damaged two of his three daughters' vision. It was renamed The Foundation Fighting Blindness last year and is based in Hunt Valley.Told in 1971 that daughters Mindy and Joanne had the degenerative disease of the retina and that there was minimal information about it, Mr. Berman embarked on his own mission to conduct research and find a cure.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1996
If the blind are ever made to see, they might recall with fascination the days when pioneering surgeons inserted electric probes into the eyes of human volunteers and, for an instant, illuminated the dark.Such experiments, now in progress at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, may be the rudimentary beginnings of a technology that will enable people blinded by the loss of light-sensing nerve cells to navigate without canes or guide dogs.Though the achievement may be years away, Wilmer scientists believe they are on a path toward an electronic implant that would complete circuits destroyed by retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease that afflicts about 100,000 people in the United States.
NEWS
By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2000
JEFF CLEVELAND IS certainly not one to run away from a problem. Instead, he runs for a solution. The Ellicott City resident and his 9-year-old daughter, Megan, have been diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an eye disease that causes degeneration of the retina and can lead to blindness. The condition is hereditary; Cleveland's father and grandfather suffered from RP and experienced progressive loss of vision. His grandfather eventually became legally blind. So far, Cleveland has experienced only slight visual impairment, and Megan, a fourth-grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, has suffered no significant loss of vision.
NEWS
November 23, 1994
John J. PughHistorical novelistJohn J. Pugh, a historical novelist, died Monday of heart failure at the MedBridge Rehabilitation Center in Rosedale. The Northwood resident was 73.His first novel, "Captain of the Medici," published in 1954, was the story of the rise of a blacksmith's son to nobility in 16th century Tuscany. More than 1 million copies were sold.He wrote two other novels, one published in 1955 and the other four years later.He was reared in Pimlico in Northwest Baltimore. After graduating from St. Ambrose's School, he entered St. Charles College and Loyola College, graduating with a bachelor's degree in 1943.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer Marcia Perskie of The Sun's Mexico City Bureau also contributed to this story | September 20, 1994
For thousands of people slowly losing their sight to a degenerative eye disease, it sounds like a miracle cure: a treatment devised by a Cuban opthalmologist that he claims can prevent retinitis pigmentosa from stealing their vision.But the Baltimore-based Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation is recommending against going to Cuba for the treatment -- despite patients who insist they left Havana with their vision improved considerably. The foundation's position, which has generated considerable controversy among RP patients, is based on what it insists is a lack of scientific proof the treatments work.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEWART | August 23, 1992
Sparrows Point pro-am has Blind Golfers qualifierNational tourney to benefit RPWorth Dalton, scheduled to make his second appearance in the Baltimore area when he participates in a pro-am tournament at Sparrows Point Country Club next month, is among 22 players who have qualified for the U.S. Blind Golfers Association 47th annual national championship Friday and Saturday at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla.The defending champion is Pat Browne of New Orleans,...
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1996
Bernard "Ben" Berman, a Baltimore real estate developer who was internationally known for his efforts to fight blindness, died Friday in a Pikesville automobile accident. He was 72.Mr. Berman founded the Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation -- an organization dedicated to curing the disease that damaged two of his three daughters' vision. It was renamed The Foundation Fighting Blindness last year and is based in Hunt Valley.Told in 1971 that daughters Mindy and Joanne had the degenerative disease of the retina and that there was minimal information about it, Mr. Berman embarked on his own mission to conduct research and find a cure.
NEWS
November 23, 1994
John J. PughHistorical novelistJohn J. Pugh, a historical novelist, died Monday of heart failure at the MedBridge Rehabilitation Center in Rosedale. The Northwood resident was 73.His first novel, "Captain of the Medici," published in 1954, was the story of the rise of a blacksmith's son to nobility in 16th century Tuscany. More than 1 million copies were sold.He wrote two other novels, one published in 1955 and the other four years later.He was reared in Pimlico in Northwest Baltimore. After graduating from St. Ambrose's School, he entered St. Charles College and Loyola College, graduating with a bachelor's degree in 1943.
NEWS
October 4, 1994
Don't forgive Haitian rulers for abusesThe critical issue for Haiti is how to break the cycle of vengeance and brutality-with-impunity.Democratic institutions have no roots there, democracy is not systemic and 80 percent of the impoverished population is illiterate.And yet there is hope for both the U.S. and this tiny island nation 500 miles off our shores.Reconciliation and respect for political minorities are essential. To achieve them, and to forestall violent revenge, there must be justice.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer Marcia Perskie of The Sun's Mexico City Bureau also contributed to this story | September 20, 1994
For thousands of people slowly losing their sight to a degenerative eye disease, it sounds like a miracle cure: a treatment devised by a Cuban opthalmologist that he claims can prevent retinitis pigmentosa from stealing their vision.But the Baltimore-based Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation is recommending against going to Cuba for the treatment -- despite patients who insist they left Havana with their vision improved considerably. The foundation's position, which has generated considerable controversy among RP patients, is based on what it insists is a lack of scientific proof the treatments work.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | June 15, 1993
Adults suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a group of inherited diseases that may cause blindness, can slow their loss of vision by taking a daily supplements of vitamin A and avoiding high doses of vitamin E, it was reported yesterday by Harvard University researchers.The $5-million study provides the first useful treatment for retinitis pigmentosa, which afflicts 100,000 Americans. The disease gradually destroys vision cells in the retina at the back of the eye.Patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa generally report night blindness in adolescence and lose peripheral and finally central vision as they age, typically going completely blind between 50 and 80.Adult patients in the study who supplemented their daily diets with 15,000 International Units of vitamin A had, on average, a 20 percent slower annual decline of remaining retinal function than those not taking the high dose, according to Dr. Eliot L. Berson, the study's principle investigator.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEWART | August 23, 1992
Sparrows Point pro-am has Blind Golfers qualifierNational tourney to benefit RPWorth Dalton, scheduled to make his second appearance in the Baltimore area when he participates in a pro-am tournament at Sparrows Point Country Club next month, is among 22 players who have qualified for the U.S. Blind Golfers Association 47th annual national championship Friday and Saturday at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla.The defending champion is Pat Browne of New Orleans,...
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 12, 1992
Now that the Orioles opening day at the new stadium is history, I can relax a little until the Preakness activities begin the week of May 10. It's not too early to decide whether you want to come up with $200 a person to attend the Triple Crown Ball on May 14.Lynda O'Dea and Harriet Finkelstein are co-chairing the ball, which will be sponsored by the chichi Paolo Gucci. John W. Kluge, self-made billionaire, has agreed to be honorary ball chairman. This year's gala, a benefit for the Baltimore-based Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP)
NEWS
October 4, 1994
Don't forgive Haitian rulers for abusesThe critical issue for Haiti is how to break the cycle of vengeance and brutality-with-impunity.Democratic institutions have no roots there, democracy is not systemic and 80 percent of the impoverished population is illiterate.And yet there is hope for both the U.S. and this tiny island nation 500 miles off our shores.Reconciliation and respect for political minorities are essential. To achieve them, and to forestall violent revenge, there must be justice.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 12, 1992
Now that the Orioles opening day at the new stadium is history, I can relax a little until the Preakness activities begin the week of May 10. It's not too early to decide whether you want to come up with $200 a person to attend the Triple Crown Ball on May 14.Lynda O'Dea and Harriet Finkelstein are co-chairing the ball, which will be sponsored by the chichi Paolo Gucci. John W. Kluge, self-made billionaire, has agreed to be honorary ball chairman. This year's gala, a benefit for the Baltimore-based Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP)
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times Evening Sun reporter Lan Nguyen contributed to this article | December 17, 1991
RESEARCHERS HAVE identified what they think is the last piece of the genetic puzzle of a major form of retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited disorder that has produced blindness in about 100,000 Americans and 1.5 million people worldwide.The discovery should make possible prenatal screening for the disorders in families with "autosomal dominant" retinitis pigmentosa, which accounts for about 43 percent of all cases of the disorder, said geneticist Jeanette S. Felix, director of science for the Baltimore-based National Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation.
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