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Gus G. Sentementes | March 14, 2012
What does Apple's latest iPad mean for users? For me, the answer is simple: potentially far less eye strain. The first two iPads had a nice display, but the third generation really packs in extra pixels and is expected to be a whole new experience. Four times more pixels than the iPad 2 , according to Apple. I did a lot on my first and second iPads (which I sold in order to upgrade), from gaming to writing to web browsing. But I didn't spend a lot of time doing focused reading on it. I think I maybe read one or two Kindle and iBooks on the devices.
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | March 14, 2012
What does Apple's latest iPad mean for users? For me, the answer is simple: potentially far less eye strain. The first two iPads had a nice display, but the third generation really packs in extra pixels and is expected to be a whole new experience. Four times more pixels than the iPad 2 , according to Apple. I did a lot on my first and second iPads (which I sold in order to upgrade), from gaming to writing to web browsing. But I didn't spend a lot of time doing focused reading on it. I think I maybe read one or two Kindle and iBooks on the devices.
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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1999
Dr. Bert M. Glaser, the well-known retina surgeon, said yesterday that he has reached a settlement with Pioneer EyeCare, a company he founded but left in June in an acrimonious split with the company's management.The settlement allows Glaser to resume his practice in Towson, and he said he is doing that this week, with a new emphasis on treating macular degeneration.A judge ruled in August that the terms of Glaser's contract with Pioneer prevented him from practicing within 15 miles of his former Pioneer offices after he left.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | March 7, 2012
Apple's CEO, Tim Cook, is on stage in San Francisco talking about iPad stuff. I'm following Engadget and Gdgt blogs for live blogging, and I'll post key details here as they come. * Cook announces a new Apple TV, with 1080 (HD) capability. New user interface. Photo Stream support, meaning you take a pic with your iPhone and it automatically appears on your TV (through Apple TV). Also, you can generate Genius playlists off your movie choices in iTunes. * iPad: Cook says, via Gdgt: “We've sold almost 15.5 million iPads last quarter alone.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | July 10, 1992
The morning after Lois H. Edwards ended a 30-year teaching career, she started going blind.She was driving with her husband and suddenly couldn't read the license plates or the street signs ahead. "This came like a shot out of hell," said the 63-year-old woman, who was beginning to lose sight at the center of her vision."The feeling of knowing suddenly you were losing your eyesight was a horror -- not being able to see to read, not being able to see color, not being able to see your husband's face was just a horror."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 19, 1997
Researchers have identified a gene that causes age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the United States.Identification of the gene, reported in today's edition of the journal Science, should eventually lead to the first treatments for the disorder, possibly including gene therapy, but it may produce more immediate benefits, experts said.The course of the disease is known to be accelerated by exposure to smoking, sunlight and high-cholesterol foods, and screening for the gene would identify individuals who should avoid such risky behavior.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1996
When my 5-year-old wants me to look at something, she pokes it right under my nose. She puts it so close I can't focus on it. Why does she do that? Is there something wrong with her vision?It sounds as though you are wondering if your daughter is nearsighted, because she acts as though you are. People who are nearsighted need to get close to objects to focus on them clearly. Nearsightedness or myopia results when light rays coming from an object pass through the focusing parts in the front of the eye (cornea and lens)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1996
If the blind are ever made to see, they might recall with fascination the days when pioneering surgeons inserted electric probes into the eyes of human volunteers and, for an instant, illuminated the dark.Such experiments, now in progress at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, may be the rudimentary beginnings of a technology that will enable people blinded by the loss of light-sensing nerve cells to navigate without canes or guide dogs.Though the achievement may be years away, Wilmer scientists believe they are on a path toward an electronic implant that would complete circuits destroyed by retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease that afflicts about 100,000 people in the United States.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1990
UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. -- A newly developed laser technique being tested at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore could open the way to therapy for a previously untreatable eye disease that afflicts millions of elderly people.Until recently, laser therapy was used to treat only select cases of the disease, "occult" macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in people over age 65. More than 75 percent ofpatients who suffer a hidden form of the disease could not be helped.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2001
Dr. L. Harrell Pierce, a distinguished eye surgeon whose pioneering techniques drew patients from all over the country, died Thursday of heart failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 87. An associate professor emeritus at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Dr. Pierce was the founder and co-director of the retina clinic at the Wilmer Eye Institute of Johns Hopkins Hospital. In the early 1950s, he was the first surgeon in the mid-Atlantic region to employ new methods that dramatically improved the success rate of surgery to repair detached retinas, said his longtime colleague, Dr. Robert B. Welch.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | April 22, 2008
Dr. Alfred Anthony Filar, a retired ophthalmologist and early retina specialist who found the time to make house calls during a lengthy career in eye care, died in his sleep of congestive heart failure April 13 at his Glen Arm home. He was 77. The Baltimore native was raised above his parents' florist shop at Eastern Avenue and Ann Street. As a young man he delivered floral arrangements by streetcar. He was a 1949 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he ran track, swam and played football.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | October 13, 2006
What's the best treatment for macular degeneration? The short answer is a new drug called Lucentis, approved by the Food and Drug Administration in June, although the drug has side effects, is extremely expensive, and is useful for only the rarer form of the disease. Macular degeneration and its new treatments were the focus of five separate articles in last week's New England Journal of Medicine. There are two kinds of macular degeneration - a disease of the retina that affects more than 9 million Americans and is a leading cause of blindness in people older than 55. In the "dry" form, which 90 percent of patients have, there is a loss of the light-sensing cells in the retina and the cells that nourish them.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
What would you say if a scientist told you she could repair an injured spinal cord by shining a light on it? Juanita Anders would certainly understand if you were skeptical. But she wants to change your mind, and she thinks she has the science behind her to do it. Over the past seven years, the neuroscientist has been studying the healing powers of low-level lasers. She has found that in rats, laser therapy can repair severed spinal cords, allowing once-injured animals to walk again. "It's remarkable," says Georgetown University researcher Kimberly Byrnes, who collaborated with Anders on the research.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2001
Dr. L. Harrell Pierce, a distinguished eye surgeon whose pioneering techniques drew patients from all over the country, died Thursday of heart failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 87. An associate professor emeritus at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Dr. Pierce was the founder and co-director of the retina clinic at the Wilmer Eye Institute of Johns Hopkins Hospital. In the early 1950s, he was the first surgeon in the mid-Atlantic region to employ new methods that dramatically improved the success rate of surgery to repair detached retinas, said his longtime colleague, Dr. Robert B. Welch.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1999
Dr. Bert M. Glaser, the well-known retina surgeon, said yesterday that he has reached a settlement with Pioneer EyeCare, a company he founded but left in June in an acrimonious split with the company's management.The settlement allows Glaser to resume his practice in Towson, and he said he is doing that this week, with a new emphasis on treating macular degeneration.A judge ruled in August that the terms of Glaser's contract with Pioneer prevented him from practicing within 15 miles of his former Pioneer offices after he left.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 19, 1997
Researchers have identified a gene that causes age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the United States.Identification of the gene, reported in today's edition of the journal Science, should eventually lead to the first treatments for the disorder, possibly including gene therapy, but it may produce more immediate benefits, experts said.The course of the disease is known to be accelerated by exposure to smoking, sunlight and high-cholesterol foods, and screening for the gene would identify individuals who should avoid such risky behavior.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | March 7, 2012
Apple's CEO, Tim Cook, is on stage in San Francisco talking about iPad stuff. I'm following Engadget and Gdgt blogs for live blogging, and I'll post key details here as they come. * Cook announces a new Apple TV, with 1080 (HD) capability. New user interface. Photo Stream support, meaning you take a pic with your iPhone and it automatically appears on your TV (through Apple TV). Also, you can generate Genius playlists off your movie choices in iTunes. * iPad: Cook says, via Gdgt: “We've sold almost 15.5 million iPads last quarter alone.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1990
UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. -- A newly developed laser technique being tested at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore could open the way to therapy for a previously untreatable eye disease that afflicts millions of elderly people.Until recently, laser therapy was used to treat only select cases of the disease, "occult" macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in people over age 65.More than 75 percent of patients who suffer a hidden form of the disease could not be helped.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1996
If the blind are ever made to see, they might recall with fascination the days when pioneering surgeons inserted electric probes into the eyes of human volunteers and, for an instant, illuminated the dark.Such experiments, now in progress at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, may be the rudimentary beginnings of a technology that will enable people blinded by the loss of light-sensing nerve cells to navigate without canes or guide dogs.Though the achievement may be years away, Wilmer scientists believe they are on a path toward an electronic implant that would complete circuits destroyed by retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease that afflicts about 100,000 people in the United States.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1996
When my 5-year-old wants me to look at something, she pokes it right under my nose. She puts it so close I can't focus on it. Why does she do that? Is there something wrong with her vision?It sounds as though you are wondering if your daughter is nearsighted, because she acts as though you are. People who are nearsighted need to get close to objects to focus on them clearly. Nearsightedness or myopia results when light rays coming from an object pass through the focusing parts in the front of the eye (cornea and lens)
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