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BUSINESS
January 1, 1999
Stores in outlet centers owned by Baltimore-based Prime Retail Inc. saw their sales rise 4.08 percent during the holiday season, the company said yesterday.Customer traffic at the company's 50 outlet centers nationwide also increased -- by 4.77 percent -- for the period from Thanksgiving to Christmas.Prime Retail, the world's largest developer, owner and manager of outlet centers, based its results on a preliminary sampling of sales reported by about 500 merchants in all categories.``Several factors, including a growing consumer emphasis on value, the great variety and large selection of brand-name merchandise available and an additional shopping day, helped achieve these increases,'' said William H. Carpenter Jr., president and chief operating officer for the real estate investment trust.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Liberty Tsakalos, a former corporate treasurer who managed the retail shop of the H&S Bakery, the Southeast Baltimore family-owned business that was co-founded by her husband, brother and father, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease complications at her Harbor East home. She was 94. "She was an anomaly of her time. She was a strong woman working in a man's world, which was especially true of the commercial baking industry in the 1950s and '60s," said her grandson Michael Tsakalos of Hunt Valley.
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BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2000
Shares in Baltimore-based Prime Retail Inc. fell 25 percent yesterday after a negative report from a key analyst and amid speculation that the company will reduce its shareholder dividend because of a continuing shortage of cash. Prime Retail, the largest owner, manager and developer of retail outlets in the world, has been burdened with heavy debt from recent acquisitions. Its shares dropped $1.375 to $4.125 on New York Stock Exchange trading of 2.97 million shares, 18 times the three-month daily average.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Baltimore Ravens fans, here's a sale for you. The Ravens plan to offer hundreds of items at discounted prices during a special merchandise sale Saturday at M&T Bank Stadium. The team will offer some items to the public for the first time, including equipment worn by players and locker room-issued apparel. Look for 2012 and 2013 season merchandise as well, including Super Bowl XLVII items. "The Ravens used to outsource our merchandising, and no longer do," Heather Harness, the team's senior manager of advertising and branding, said in an email. "Now that we control our pricing, we can offer our fans some really great prices.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and William Patalon III and Gus G. Sentementes and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2003
Whipsawed by volatile oil prices, bogged down by debt and unable to sell off its two modest refineries, Crown Central Petroleum Corp. had no choice but to put the entire company on the auction block, industry analysts said yesterday. But it won't be easy because Crown's refineries are too small and need tens of millions of dollars in upgrades, the analysts said. Further, many of the company's 315 retail outlets need a face lift. Compounding a difficult situation is the possibility of war with Iraq, which could spark volatility in the oil market and turn potential suitors into corporate tire-kickers.
NEWS
By David P. Greisman | February 25, 2007
The Carroll County commissioners have approved an ordinance that allows developers to have second-floor apartments above shopping center retail outlets. The ordinance, approved Thursday, limits the mixing of residential and retail uses to shopping centers with two stories. Each apartment must be on the upper level and between 600 and 1,000 square feet in size.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2000
The state Motor Vehicle Administration said yesterday that it will begin an investigation into General Motors Corp.'s recent purchase of five new-car dealerships in the Baltimore area. As part of what it called a "reconstruction project," GM acquired the dealerships and has partnered with two Houston auto dealers who will operate the stores and, eventually, plan to buy out the factory. Charles D. Schaub, manager of business licensing at the MVA, said yesterday that he wants to make certain that the transaction is not a violation of a Maryland law that prohibits auto manufacturers from owning retail outlets.
NEWS
August 5, 1991
A year ago, new federal regulations were issued that prohibit the dumping of almost anything -- plastic, paper, food, metal and glass -- into U.S. waters. The cost for violating the law includes a civil penalty of up to $25,000, a fine of up to $50,000 and a maximum of five years in prison.Regulations also require skippers of recreationalboats 26 feet and larger to prominently display a 9- by 4-inch anti-pollution placard. Over the past year, thousands of boaters have obtained the placard, but many others are still unaware of the requirement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Cromelin | March 20, 2005
What do you do to mark the 10th anniversary of the all-time biggest-selling debut album by a female solo artist? If you're Alanis Morissette, you do it again. The singer-songwriter will celebrate the 1995 release of Jagged Little Pill by recording an acoustic version of the record, which made the then-21-year-old Canadian artist a pop sensation with such emotionally candid hits as "You Oughta Know" and "All I Really Want." The album has sold 14 million copies in the United States and brought Morissette four Grammy awards, including album of the year.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1998
It's "always Coca-Cola" that shoppers will find in the vending machines at outlet centers owned by Baltimore-based Prime Retail Inc., under an alliance announced yesterday.The agreement gives Coca-Cola USA exclusive rights to put vending machines in each of Prime's 50 outlet centers in 26 states. In return, Prime -- the world's largest owner and operator of outlet centers -- gets a cut of the soft-drink sales.Both companies said they view the partnership as a brand-building tool."Prime Retail has at its disposal 50 shopping venues that are very popular with our core consumers," said Diana Garza, a spokeswoman for Coca-Cola USA in Atlanta.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Sales at all three ReStore locations Saturday will support a Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake home under construction in Baltimore's Orchard Ridge community. Shoppers will find a broad selection of quality building materials, appliances, furniture, cabinets, flooring, lighting and plumbing materials at affordable prices. In addition to the regular discounts, the stores are offering 50 percent off all lighting and 20 percent off all donated items. The Dundalk, Pasadena and Halethorpe ReStores will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sales profits enable the local Habitat chapter to continue its affordable homeownership opportunities in the greater Baltimore metropolitan area as well as in Anne Arundel and Howard counties.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
Shoppers with upscale tastes but shallow pockets are finding more shopping choices with a recent resurgence in outlet and off-price stores being rolled out by major retailers. Discount shopping isn't new. Bargain shoppers have trekked out to outlet malls for decades seeking discounts. Stores like TJ Maxx and Marshalls, who buy leftover goods from department stores and other places and sell them at a markdown, have prospered during the weak economy. But retailers are discovering new opportunities in discount and outlet shopping as frugal consumers are being more careful about what they spend and retailers are looking for ways to grow.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Reporter | July 26, 2008
By choosing to build a new arena on the west side of downtown, Baltimore is placing a $300 million bet on an area that has long struggled to come to life. One problem has been 1st Mariner Arena itself, a 46-year-old albatross with only one entrance and no street-level retail outlets - a hulk that stifles the blocks around it. Proponents of a new downtown arena call the project a shot in the arm for the west side, while critics said yesterday that a mega-project is a bad fit for that area.
NEWS
By David P. Greisman | February 25, 2007
The Carroll County commissioners have approved an ordinance that allows developers to have second-floor apartments above shopping center retail outlets. The ordinance, approved Thursday, limits the mixing of residential and retail uses to shopping centers with two stories. Each apartment must be on the upper level and between 600 and 1,000 square feet in size.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | September 2, 2006
Officially, the calendar still declares it summertime. But this weekend, fall has arrived -- in stores, at least. It's Labor Day weekend, and that means it's time to shop for a new fall wardrobe. The prospect is thrilling for some and daunting for others. A new fall wardrobe might amount to great outfits and accessories, but it could also mean sucking the fresh-from-summer-vacation bank account dry. It doesn't have to be that way, fashion experts say. Fall shopping on a budget is not an oxymoron.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 15, 2006
DETROIT -- Ford Motor Co. plans to shrink its network of U.S. dealerships because it's selling fewer vehicles and wants to reduce competition among Ford outlets. "We have more dealers than we can support profitably," spokesman Jim Cain said yesterday. "Our dealers have said increasing dealer profitability is the No. 1 issue they want us to focus on." Most of the Ford, Lincoln and Mercury retail outlets that would be eliminated are in metropolitan areas, Cain said. The reduction would be "strictly voluntary," Cain said, declining to give details.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | July 30, 2000
Like the moon (and sometimes seemingly as often), styles wax and wane. The '90s saw a surge of minimalism -- stark lines, neutral colors -- in reaction to the baroque and ball-fringe era of the '80s. Country style -- checked gingham and crowds of collectibles -- has given way to cottage style: relaxed upholstered furniture, simple natural fabrics. So alert trend watchers should take note: Excess is creeping back into the design domain. But, unlike the '80s, this time it's mostly in small doses.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
MinuteClinic is closing its six locations at Target outlets in the Baltimore area next month, but opening seven in nearby CVS drugstores. The shift doesn't represent a retreat for the concept of basic-care clinics in retail stores. In fact, it signals the opposite - a jockeying for position as quick clinics enter a period of rapid expansion and increased competition. "As we looked at the future, we believe strategically we will be able to grow quicker through CVS," said Michael Howe, MinuteClinic's chief executive.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2005
The fragrance of roasting sesame seeds wafts from a corner of the cavernous Rhee Bros. warehouse in Columbia. Mini-forklift trucks zip past pallets stacked high with crates of ramen, soy sauce, hot pepper paste, tea, pickled vegetables, salted jellyfish, soft drinks and rice. In a second warehouse nearby, a kitchen crew trims mounds of radishes, napa cabbage and scallions in preparation for making kimchi, the pungent Korean staple. The bustling warehouse tableaux speak volumes about the changing face of America - and its evolving palate.
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