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NEWS
April 10, 2014
I was standing in line in a store recently when I heard this phrase over and over again on a closed circuit television, "Get more Easter for your dollar. " It struck me that this national chain apparently knows nothing of what Easter is. Easter is not for sale in any store. Easter is not a commodity that one buys. Easter is not something that one brings home in a shopping bag. Easter is the celebration of that glorious day when the Lord Jesus Christ rose from the grave and left His tomb empty to show His power over sin, death, Satan and the grave.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 26, 2014
I am very confused about the city's motivation to resurrect the speed camera system ( "Redflex lobbying Baltimore for speed camera contract," Aug. 21). For a very long time now, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has repeated the mantra that the speed cameras are not about the money, but for the safety of Baltimore citizens. But now we have Councilman Robert Curran saying, "Why don't we have them backup? What's going on? We're losing revenue. " And then there is Councilwoman Helen Holton's statement that "I look at the revenue that other jurisdictions are getting and ask, 'Why would we not?
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 26, 1993
TIRANA, Albania -- It was a hallelujah yesterday for Europe's poorest nation: Pope John Paul II came in golden robes to celebrate a national resurrection. There can have been few spring days in the past half-century as exalting for a Balkan land so long self-consumed by tyranny, isolation and the systematic persecution of all religion.Improbability reigned for a day in a time-stood-still place whose Communist leaders once proclaimed the world's first officially atheistic nation.The world's most famous Albanian, octogenarian apostle of the poor, Mother Teresa of Calcutta, humbly came in sandals and her trademark blue-and-white habit.
NEWS
April 10, 2014
I was standing in line in a store recently when I heard this phrase over and over again on a closed circuit television, "Get more Easter for your dollar. " It struck me that this national chain apparently knows nothing of what Easter is. Easter is not for sale in any store. Easter is not a commodity that one buys. Easter is not something that one brings home in a shopping bag. Easter is the celebration of that glorious day when the Lord Jesus Christ rose from the grave and left His tomb empty to show His power over sin, death, Satan and the grave.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 2002
"God has raised this Jesus to life," asserted the apostle Peter in an early sermon that is recorded in the New Testament book of Acts, "and we are all witnesses of the fact." This Easter Sunday, Christians around the world and throughout Howard County will also testify to that event - the resurrection of Jesus Christ from death by crucifixion. The Easter celebration commemorates this core belief of Christendom, area clergy say. "The whole church year points to Easter," said the Rev. Jack Fitzgerald, senior pastor of Columbia's Alberta Gary Memorial United Methodist Church.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 21, 1992
Is there a connection between Tom Clancy and the Rev. Sun Myung Moon?Frontline's "The Resurrection of Reverend Moon," at 9 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67), implies there is a connection between the Calvert County author and the cult leader who was convicted of tax fraud. But like many such suggestions in the documentary, it is more a matter of video sleight-of-hand and implication than any evidence of a real link gathered through hard investigative reporting."The Resurrection of Reverend Moon" is not one of Frontline's finest hours.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 2003
PARK CITY, Utah - Rapper Tupac Shakur spent just three years in Baltimore, but the time had a profound effect on him, according to a new documentary that premiered this week at the Sundance Film Festival. Tupac: Resurrection characterizes Shakur's stint from 1986 to 1988 at the Baltimore School for the Arts as an awakening for the performer, who would become a pop-culture martyr after his unsolved shooting death in 1996. "It was his first time identifying as an artist," director Lauren Lazin said yesterday.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2000
"All these years," a narrator intones as the camera hovers over a Los Angeles street, "and soon we'll have one. A champion." The voice belongs to Roberto Santiago (Tony Plana), patriarch of a family whose men have, for generations, measured their success in the boxing ring. The champion he's referring to is his son, Carlos (Michael DeLorenzo), who's about to take on the number-one middleweight contender for a shot at the title. But he could also be talking about "Resurrection Boulevard," which premieres tonight on Showtime.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2002
Here's a Howard County sports trivia question: Name the gymnasium that never experienced a bouncing ball before becoming the sanctuary of a church that three decades later has spawned a new, much better gymnasium. It is Church of the Resurrection in Ellicott City. The thriving Roman Catholic parish's focus of worship on Paulskirk Drive was originally intended to be the gymnasium for the new school of the much older St. Paul's Catholic Church on one of the Ellicott City hillsides overlooking the Patapsco River.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 26, 1997
Good news, ladies: If "Alien Resurrection" has it right, in the future you may be attacked by aliens, abandoned in outer space, cloned from a drop of blood and forced to give birth to a biomorphic monster, but you'll get a great manicure along the way.The well-groomed nails (looks like Vamp from here) are just the first indication that Ripley isn't the same heroine audiences fell for when she first appeared in Ridley Scott's classic "Alien" in 1987.Back then, she was a female icon the likes of which filmgoers had rarely seen: quiet, competent, by-the-book and stronger and braver than all the boys.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 25, 2014
In the face of education and community issues that stretch across traditional neighborhood lines, leaders in the Loch Raven area have joined forces to resurrect the dormant Loch Raven Community Council. "It's been defunct for a number of years," Councilman David Marks, who represents the area, said. "I wanted to bring it back because I think there's a real value in having the community organizations talking to one another. I also think there are some common issues that need to be addressed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Literary legend has it that James Michener saw a great blue heron above the St. Michaels property he was inspecting and immediately decided to buy the 25 acres and the old house that sat on a creek off the Choptank River, near the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay. It was an omen, he is said to have concluded. This would be where he researched and wrote his next expansive historical novel, "Chesapeake," which would be published in 1978. He called the retreat "Southwind" for the unceasing breeze that blew up the bay. It was the same kind of epiphany that struck Dr. Paul and Anne Yarbrough Gurbel of Baltimore, who had been searching for a weekend home in St. Michaels for two years.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 5, 2013
Congress will reconvene shortly. That means more battles over taxes and spending, regulations and safety nets, and how to get the economy out of first gear. Which means more gridlock and continual showdowns over budget resolutions and the debt ceiling. But before the hostilities start again and we all get lost in political strategies and petty tactics, it's useful to consider what's really at stake for our economy and democracy. For much of the past century, the basic bargain at the heart of America was that employers paid their workers enough to buy what American employers were selling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
Sherlock Holmes un-kicked the bucket way back in 1894. More than a century later, even though Harry Potter ends up on the wrong side of a killing curse, he un-bites the dust. In "Game of Thrones," Beric Dondarrion has un-bought the farm at least six times, despite having been hanged, impaled by a lance, bashed in the head with a mace and stabbed through the eye with a dagger. And that's just by the end of the third season. So author Walter Mosley had ample precedent to un-pull the plug on his most famous fictional creation, Ezekiel "Easy" Rawlins.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | May 26, 2013
For a team that was on life support just two months ago, Towson University's baseball team sure shows a lot of life. How great is the story the Tigers are writing this spring? In March they were told by school president Maravene Loeschke that the program was being dropped for budget and Title IX compliance reasons, only to have it saved when the state stepped into the huge PR disaster with an infusion of cash. Now here they are going to the NCAA tournament after winning their first ever Colonial Athletic Association championship Saturday with a 5-2 win over William & Mary in Harrisonburg, Va. The whole thing reads like a Hollywood script: once-doomed team, now a gritty No. 4 seed in the league tournament, goes undefeated in four pressurized games to make it to the Big Dance for the first time since 1991.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 25, 2013
Some Annapolis lawmakers have gotten in the Easter spirit a little early.  A bill that would curtail millions in renewable-energy subsidies for mostly out-of-state paper mills comes to the Senate floor Monday, after being killed last week and then revived with a special deal for Maryland's only paper-making plant. The bill, SB684 , pushed by environmentalists, would phase out the ability of paper facilities to cash in on Maryland's renewable energy law by burning "black liquor," a tarry byproduct of the pulping process, and other wood waste to power their operations.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2000
With sunrise services, bouquets of white lilies and choruses of alleluias, Christians around the world today celebrate the central tenet of their faith: the resurrection of Jesus Christ. But the feast doesn't just commemorate the empty tomb. Before Easter Sunday and Jesus' resurrection came Good Friday and his suffering and death on the cross. Increasingly, theologians and pastors emphasize this complete paschal mystery, the winter before spring, and the suffering before new life. On this Easter Sunday, four Baltimore-area Christians -- a choir director who has overcome an addiction, an Episcopal priest battling breast cancer, a mother who buried her daughter, a pastor rebuilding his church after a devastating fire -- reflect on the adversity they have faced in the light of the resurrection's promise of hope.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | September 1, 2012
John Tokar, owner of Vintage Restorations Limited, in Union Bridge, started tinkering with British cars in 1969 when he was a teen in Bayonne, N.J., and his uncle sold him a 1959 Hillman Minx for $50. "It needed a clutch, so I got involved in working on it and I never stopped," the 61-year-old New Jersey native recalled, pointing to a framed photo of his office wall of himself and that '59 Hillman. "That car was what got me started, then I went to Triumphs, and now my specialty is MGs, which is mostly what I do these days," he said, pointing to another photo, this one of himself a few years later, a college student standing next to a vintage Triumph Spitfire.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
The first of the 51/2-foot-tall fiberglass chickens roosts in a vacant lot beside an Annapolis restaurant, a tire's skid marks stretched across its belly and a set of X's for eyes. Apparently, the owners joke, it had trouble crossing the road. The next chicken might be a robot, a spectacle of glitter, the canvas for an underwater mural or, perhaps, a mosaic of crabs and sailboats for a twist on the classic Annapolis images the statues were designed to avoid. "If it was a boat or a fish, I wouldn't be into doing it. But a chicken is funny," artist Casey Johnson said as he surveyed Chicken Little and contemplated his own design.
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