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By John Dorsey | October 1, 1998
Tzigane Fine Arts, run by Jennifer von Muehlen of Havre de Grace, organizes art exhibitions and has a current one at Resurgam Gallery in South Baltimore. Called "Encounters," it brings together the work of 14 artists and, according to a Tzigane statement, includes the introspective, seductive, confrontational, evocative and amusing. Among the artists are Ruth Channing, Noelle Zeltzman, Joanne Boldt, Mara De Luca, Suzan Rouse, Julia Niederman, David Guinn and Edward Epstein.Resurgam Gallery, 910 S. Charles St., is open noon to 6 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By ALLIE SEMENZA | May 31, 2007
Four local artists are featured at Resurgam Gallery in the seventh annual installment of Marks, Brookes, & Brown. The exhibit features floral oil paintings by Cissy Smith Marks, new oils by architect Paul Marks, watercolor and oil work from Claudia L. Brookes and craft work from Ron Brown, a wood-turner. The show has more than 100 new pieces. Marks, Brookes, & Brown opens today and runs through July 1 at the Resurgam Gallery, 910 S. Charles St. The opening reception is 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Saturday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1996
Resurgam, the South Baltimore cooperative gallery, usually shows the works of its members. But each year for the past four it has held a national open exhibition with a distinguished curator.This year's edition was curated by James W. Mahoney, a Washington, D.C., artist, critic and curator. He has selected 78 works by 55 artists submitting entries from states as far-flung as Washington, California, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, Kentucky, New Jersey and Florida. There are works in painting, sculpture, photography, ceramics, fiber, woodwork and metalwork, including this "Whispering Teapot" by Marci Margolin of San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 2, 2004
Inanna, Queen of Heaven and Earth, was the name given to history's first recorded goddess by the ancient Sumerians, a Babylonian people who lived some 4,000 years ago between what is today Baghdad and the Persian Gulf. Inanna possessed awesome powers as well as great wisdom, so it's no wonder painter Edna Emmet, whose lovely exhibition opens at Resurgam Gallery tonight, was inspired to create dozens of abstract-expressionist paintings inspired by this female deity's legend. Emmet, who teaches art at the Waldorf School and other area institutions, scrupulously avoids recognizable images in her paintings, which are full of saturated colors and sensual, abstract forms and whose passionate intensity approaches that with which the ancients must have worshipped their goddess.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | July 14, 1993
The South Baltimore cooperative gallery Resurgam usually shows its members' work, of course -- that's what a cooperative gallery is all about -- but it has just mounted its first annual open exhibition (open, that is, for a change only to people who are not members of the co-op). It invited as juror Joan Erbe, a veteran Baltimore painter whose work was seen to advantage recently at Nye Gomez Gallery, and she has selected well to come up with a show of almost four dozen works in various media that have in common their creators' skill at the disciplines they have chosen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | November 5, 1998
James DuSel photographs buildings and prints them by a palladium process that achieves tonal nuances and a historical look. Ruth Pettus' paintings of men have become well-known in the Baltimore area, but she keeps them fresh through shifts in emphasis.Both artists are represented individually in the show that opens today at Resurgam Gallery, and in addition they have collaborated on works in the cliche verre process, which dates from the 19th century. In this process, an image is drawn on a surface (traditionally a piece of glass, but in this case a sheet of film)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 1, 1993
Ruth Pettus, in the current two-person exhibit at Resurgam Gallery, shows a group of variations on her "Men in Suits" theme, and the results are mixed. That phrase usually carries a negative connotation, but in this case I mean genuinely mixed.Much of what gives Pettus' work its considerable interest continues here: the expressionist surfaces, with their hard gestural strokes that are like jabs with a knife; the somber colors, shot with highlights, that help establish an ominous atmosphere; the sense of confinement, either in a room or in a landscape with a horizon that's either nonexistent or very high, so that escape seems impossible; and the men, figures only partly defined or distinguished from the backgrounds from which they emerge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 2, 2004
Inanna, Queen of Heaven and Earth, was the name given to history's first recorded goddess by the ancient Sumerians, a Babylonian people who lived some 4,000 years ago between what is today Baghdad and the Persian Gulf. Inanna possessed awesome powers as well as great wisdom, so it's no wonder painter Edna Emmet, whose lovely exhibition opens at Resurgam Gallery tonight, was inspired to create dozens of abstract-expressionist paintings inspired by this female deity's legend. Emmet, who teaches art at the Waldorf School and other area institutions, scrupulously avoids recognizable images in her paintings, which are full of saturated colors and sensual, abstract forms and whose passionate intensity approaches that with which the ancients must have worshipped their goddess.
NEWS
May 9, 1998
In Thursday's LIVE section, the address for Resurgam Gallery was listed incorrectly. The gallery is at 910 S. Charles St.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 5/09/98
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | December 1, 2005
Print Show Resurgam Gallery will display pieces by two printmakers, Suzan Rouse and Megan O'Brien Gold, today through Dec. 24. Rouse's work incorporates monoprint, etching and collograph techniques. Gold uses real plants in her printmaking process. The show includes about 35 prints. There will be a reception 5 p.m.-8 p.m. today. Resurgam Gallery is at 910 S. Charles St. Call 410-962-0513 or visit resurgamgallery.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | March 4, 2004
Color and light Local psychologist and artist Alice Dvoskin will exhibit her recent works in Travels in Color and Light, on display beginning Saturday at Resurgam Gallery. More than 20 oil-on-canvas paintings show disparate subject matter and various creative techniques, from deep-hued water scenes composed of dry brushstrokes to sunlit landscapes in colorful palettes and clean lines. Dvoskin, who moved from New York to Baltimore more than three decades ago, will be at the show's opening reception, 5 p.m.-8 p.m. Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | February 8, 1996
Ruth Channing's etchings are witty, charming and serious all at once. Some of her recent small-scale ones, on view at Resurgam, originate in poetry, the autobiography of Casanova and subjects from early printmaking, such as "Death, the Raconteur," shown here.Channing is one of three artists in Resurgam's current show. The others are Jimmie Miller, whose brightly colored collages are abstract but often contain suggestions of architecture; and Carlene Bausch Moscatt, whose charcoal drawings employ subject matter from nature, including vines and leafy plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOHN DORSEY | January 14, 1999
The Women Artists' Forum of Baltimore is a group of emerging professional artists founded in the spring of 1997 to learn about art-related issues. It is open to artists in the Baltimore region and so far has organized two shows of members' work. The current one is at Resurgam Gallery on South Charles Street and features works by 28 of the current 37 members. Among them are Helene Ageloff, Frances Aubrey, Mary Catalano, Ruth Channing, Marge Feldman, Nancy Linden, Sally Sanford Ney, Beverly Polt, Michelle Santos and Bert Wallace.
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