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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Leonhardt and David Leonhardt,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 27, 1999
It is a tenet of the job search, passed down to college graduates for decades: Keep your resume short, ideally no more than one page. A single sheet is more likely to hold an employer's attention and make an applicant look organized, not arrogant.Now, however, the Internet is doing to one-page resumes what it has done to personal letters and travel agents. It is making them less relevant and perhaps even endangering their survival.White space, brevity and verbs are out. Nouns and comprehensive descriptions including obscure proper nouns, like the names of computer programs, are in. If the resume continues page after page, or screen after screen, so be it. Even Headhunter.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | September 4, 2014
Et cetera Racing at Laurel resumes Friday; 'Love' heavy favorite Live racing returns to the major Maryland tracks for the first-time since early June as the 65-day Laurel Park fall meeting begins Friday. Admission and programs are free on opening day. First post is at 1:10 p.m. The nine-race card features four $42,000 allowance races on the turf course. A fifth grass race of the day is headlined by Drunken Love, who looks to go 6-for-6 on the Laurel Park turf in the finale.
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BUSINESS
By Molly Selvin and Molly Selvin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2008
Fibbing on your resume is a really bad idea. First, you probably will be found out by the army of commercial background screeners that employers deploy to scour resumes, check criminal records and pull credit histories. Plus, you don't need to. Many bosses are pretty forgiving if you come clean about a minor brush with the law or a supervisor so nutty he sent you running for the door. Yet, resume tinkering is practically an epidemic. Superheated competition for jobs, especially those with big paychecks, tempts many applicants to pump air into their resumes.
NEWS
By Patrick Cha | July 30, 2014
Maryland native Joseph Gantt joined the Army at 18, serving with distinction as a Sergeant First Class in the South Pacific during World War II, even though the military segregated him because of the color of his skin. Gantt had redeployed to the front lines of Korea in December 1950 as a field medic with the 2nd Infantry Division when his unit was overrun by enemy forces. Gantt was thrown into a prison camp and reportedly died there in March 1951. But his wife, Clara Gantt, refused to lose faith.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | September 23, 1993
I was born to write a newspaper column. My grandmother, the now-dead but still larger-than-life Jessie Peterson, wrote a column for the Herald, a weekly in Sharpsburg, Pa., in the early 1960s. So you see, it's genetic.Jessie Peterson, in her 70s at the time, would comment on who was visiting from out of town and who was in the hospital or what babies had been born, keeping her readers up to date with happenings in the small community of Aspinwall, outside Pittsburgh. An old family scrapbook contains some of the columns, now fragile and yellowing with age.The column's appearance must have been haphazard, however, because it seems that each one begins with a paragraph explaining why last week's column did not appear, and a promise to do better.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA and CAROLYN BIGDA,Chicago Tribune | December 17, 2006
Have you ever told a story and embellished the details a bit? I've certainly caught myself exaggerating on occasion, saying, "I waited an eternity for the subway to come," or "It was the funniest joke ever." In those cases, the exaggeration is harmless. When it comes to your resume, though, overstating or making up facts can have serious ramifications. RadioShack Corp.'s former chief executive, David Edmondson, for example, left this year when two college degrees listed on his resume could not be confirmed.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | November 21, 2007
To write one or not. I'm talking about the cover letter. Eileen Levitt, president of the HR Team in Columbia, wrote me recently to lament about how shocked she was "by how many people don't include them in applications, even when they are requested in ads." Here's the back story: Levitt posted a job for an executive assistant for her human resources consulting firm, specifically asking applicants to send a cover letter. But about 80 percent didn't follow instructions, Levitt says. "As a result, we didn't even consider those people as applicants," she says.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Kitchen and Patricia Kitchen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2003
NEW YORK - For about four months early last year, Steve Willett had been looking for a job. The laid-off project manager from Jericho, N.Y., sent resumes, made phone calls and attended networking events. Nary a nibble. After hearing one fellow job hunter say, "I'm a CEO, and people won't even look at my resume," Willett started thinking last spring about how to make himself stand out from the crowd. Which is what led him to think of putting his photo and resume on a 2 1/2 -by-3 1/2 -inch card (the size of a baseball trading card)
NEWS
October 8, 2003
Mike Bowler is on assignment. His column, The Education Beat, will resume Sunday.
NEWS
March 19, 1993
Roger Simon is ill. His column will resume on his return.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
I would want a decent-sized break in the middle if I played baseball every day from March to October too, but since I don't, I can fairly say that this week is unbearable and I'm glad sports are back tonight. You can tell how little has happened in the past day by all the analysis found in the Coffee Companion, where we recap the previous day's sports headlines. - The Orioles open the second half with three games in Oakland, the team that was responsible for Manny Machado's reputation taking a hit but ultimately might have also sparked his turnaround this year.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
The five-hour cease fire between Hamas and Israel in the Gaza Strip was the calm before the storm. Hamas rockets began raining down on Israel at the moment the United Nations-requested lull ended on Thursday afternoon. Israel waited a bit longer - three hours or so - before resuming air strikes but then followed with a long-anticipated ground offensive aimed at eliminating so-called "terror tunnels" that allow militants access to Israeli territory. For the moment, Egyptian efforts to broker a truce appear to have amounted to nothing, and the prospects for a more permanent peace appear dim, indeed.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 9, 2014
The working population is heading toward retirement like lemmings to the edge of the cliff - about 10,000 Americans turn 65 every day. And although that age is no longer the hard and fast stop date it was in the past, it is certainly a watershed moment. At 65, there is no denying the end of working life is approaching. If we baby boomers have rewritten the books at every life stage, we will certainly add to that book in retirement. And women may get a chapter all their own. The women who entered the workforce in such numbers in the late 1960s and 1970s are approaching retirement now, but their resumes don't look much like their male counterpart's, and it is likely to affect their retirement decisions.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
HOUSTON -- Orioles catcher Matt Wieters isn't looking beyond Friday, when he is scheduled to throw for the first time in more than three weeks, but he's still encouraged by the progress with his right elbow. "It's gotten a lot better over the last few days, which is what we were waiting on," Wieters said Thursday. "Now it's just a matter of going through the throwing progression and hopefully everything keeps getting better. "Every movement that gets me back towards getting on the field is good.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
A member of the Carroll Board of County Commissioners opened the panel's meeting Tuesday with a prayer "in Jesus' name," resuming the controversial practice a week after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that similar prayers before government meetings in an upstate New York town didn't violate the Constitution. In her short prayer, County Commissioner Robin Frazier asked for "wisdom and guidance as we do the work for the people of Carroll County. " The board had suspended its practice of opening meetings with sectarian prayers in April after two county residents won an injunction from a federal court.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Kenwood High School in Essex was evacuated early Tuesday morning due to bomb threat, but Baltimore County Police said that no such device was found and that classes resumed at around 9:45 a.m. Police reported the incident around 8:07 a.m. Kenwood enrolls 1,750 students in grades 9 through 12, according to the school website.
FEATURES
November 20, 1992
Mike Littwin has the day off. His column will resume Nov. 23.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
The Maryland Seafood Marketing Program, an effort of the state's Department of Natural Resources, has started up its fourth season of chef education tours.  The tours offer culinary professionals an opportunity to see Chesapeake seafood products up close, and to harvest them alongside the watermen who derive their livelihood on the bay. In its first three years, more than 400 chefs have enrolled in the education tours, on which they've explored...
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Republican gubernatorial hopeful Ron George usually keeps quiet about the flashiest part of his biography. But as he fielded a question about film tax credits at a candidates forum last week, George let slip that he had a brief and unglamorous career as a daytime soap opera actor. "I got to die once and come back a couple months later," George told a crowd at the University of Maryland law school. That's not all. The Republican delegate from Anne Arundel County is still a card-carrying member of the Screen Actors Guild, he said, a distinction that over the decades has earned him bit parts in various productions.
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