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Restrictions On Abortion

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By Sandy Banisky | October 23, 1991
Activists on both sides of the abortion issue in Maryland found reason for encouragement in Monday's federal court decision in Pennsylvania allowing restrictions on abortion.Opponents of abortion took the ruling as more evidence that the momentum in the fight is shifting dramatically to their side. Supporters of Maryland's new abortion law, set to be tested in a November 1992 referendum, said the ruling would prompt people who have never been active on the issue to join the campaign to keep abortion legal.
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NEWS
By George F. Will | July 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- It probably was inevitable that partial-birth abortion would become, as it did some while ago, a sacrament in the Church of "Choice." That sect's theology cannot risk conceding that what is killed in an abortion ever possesses more moral significance than a tumor. Hence it cannot concede that society's sensibilities should be lacerated by, or that its respect for life might be damaged by, any method of abortion. But how did this surgical procedure become, as it did Wednesday, not just a constitutional right but a "fundamental" constitutional right -- a right deemed integral to the enjoyment of liberty?
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 8, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Though weary from a long night of watching the abortion issue get pulled this way and that in the election returns, both sides started to gear up yesterday for the next round of fights -- probably starting in Michigan and Ohio -- over new laws against abortion.Those two big states were singled out by abortion foes as the first places to test in state legislatures the political gains they claimed in the Tuesday results.In Ohio and Michigan, the aim of anti-abortion forces will be the same as it has been in recent years: get the legislatures to pass tough new restrictions on abortion and to set up new tests in court of theirauthority to curb the right to end a pregnancy.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | March 25, 1994
By a resounding 30-17 margin, the Maryland Senate fell in step behind its women members yesterday and agreed to lift restrictions on state funding of abortions for poor women.The restrictions, in one form or another, date back some 15 years. The state now pays for abortions only when a woman is the victim of rape or incest or faces serious physical or mental health problems by continuing the pregnancy.An amendment allowing the use of state Medicaid funds to terminate pregnancies was tacked onto the Schaefer administration's welfare reform bill, which then received preliminary approval on a voice vote.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | January 20, 1991
In hopes of winning passage this year of a bill that would keep most abortions legal, another abortion rights group has decided to join the legislative lobbying campaign in Annapolis.Choice PAC, a political action committee organized last spring to raise funds for candidates who support legal abortion, is forming a lobbying arm called Choice Committee to help press for approval of an abortion rights bill. Choice Committee will become a member of Marylanders for the Right to Choose, a coalition of about 100 groups.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 7, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The abortion issue, promoted as never before as a crucial question for America's mainstream voters, turned into a political puzzle of deep complexity as the ballots were counted yesterday.Two public officeholders who were special favorites of one side or the other in the abortion controversy were thrown out of office or seemed close to defeat, and their stands on the subject seemed to be a contributing if not the decisive factor.One who clearly did not survive after being targeted for defeat by the other side was Florida's Republican Gov. Bob Martinez, TC fervent abortion foe who could not get the legislature to pass restrictive bills he wanted.
NEWS
By George F. Will | July 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- It probably was inevitable that partial-birth abortion would become, as it did some while ago, a sacrament in the Church of "Choice." That sect's theology cannot risk conceding that what is killed in an abortion ever possesses more moral significance than a tumor. Hence it cannot concede that society's sensibilities should be lacerated by, or that its respect for life might be damaged by, any method of abortion. But how did this surgical procedure become, as it did Wednesday, not just a constitutional right but a "fundamental" constitutional right -- a right deemed integral to the enjoyment of liberty?
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | April 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- This may finally be the year when the abortion issue comes front and center in presidential politics. If it happens, it could represent a significant threat to President Bush's re-election.The abortion question already has shown itself to be a volatile one in some legislative and gubernatoral campaigns, most notable in the 1989 elections of Govs. L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia and James Florio of New Jersey. But it has never been a prime factor in a presidential campaign because there always have been other issues that were either more immediate or more pertinent.
NEWS
By Timothy M. Phelps and Timothy M. Phelps,Newsday | April 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A majority of Americans, when asked, say they support Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court abortion decision that has led to virtual guerrilla warfare over the meaning of life.But an even larger majority of Americans say in poll after poll that they endorse a different Supreme Court decision last year that upheld Roe vs. Wade but also upheld the states' right to place restrictions on abortion.That consensus, the product of 20 years of legal wrangles and the anguish of three essentially anti-abortion Supreme Court justices, is about to be challenged by the Clinton administration and the Democratic leadership in Congress.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and John W. Frece and Sandy Banisky and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 9, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Abortion-rights supporters won crucial preliminary Senate approval yesterday of a bill intended to keep most abortions legal in Maryland regardless of future U.S. Supreme Court actions.Debate on the legislation lasted a relatively brief 5 1/2 hours. Last year, an anti-abortion filibuster on a similar bill ran on for eight days, paralyzing the Senate and ultimately leading to the bill's death.Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., D-Prince George's, praised the Senate for its orderly handling of the bill and 13 attempted amendments.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | August 21, 1993
The second shooting of an abortion doctor this year suggests a growing extremism in an anti-abortion movement that feels increasingly frustrated by the political process, some leaders on both sides of the issue said yesterday.Rebuffed by the U.S. Supreme Court, rejected by the White House and shunned by many state legislatures, some abortion opponents feel so frustrated by political obstacles that more violence is likely, they say.While major anti-abortion groups reject illegal activity, violent episodes continue.
NEWS
By JULIE ROVNER | August 1, 1993
Washington -- Why can't abortion rights groups see whe they're ahead?Talk about not knowing how to win!To listen to some of the major abortion rights groups as well as pro-abortion-rights women members of the House these days, you'd think the right to abortion is as imperiled as it was last year, when the Supreme Court seemed poised to overturn Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.In fact, the opposite is true, and not only thanks to President Clinton's nomination to the Supreme Court of abortion-rights backer Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
NEWS
By Timothy M. Phelps and Timothy M. Phelps,Newsday | April 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A majority of Americans, when asked, say they support Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court abortion decision that has led to virtual guerrilla warfare over the meaning of life.But an even larger majority of Americans say in poll after poll that they endorse a different Supreme Court decision last year that upheld Roe vs. Wade but also upheld the states' right to place restrictions on abortion.That consensus, the product of 20 years of legal wrangles and the anguish of three essentially anti-abortion Supreme Court justices, is about to be challenged by the Clinton administration and the Democratic leadership in Congress.
NEWS
By RICHARD HADDAD | May 19, 1992
As virtually every Maryland voter knows by now, a question regarding abortion will be on our ballot in November.We will be asked whether we wish to ratify a law crafted by our General Assembly to protect abortion rights in the state in the event the U.S. Supreme Court reverses its 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade. The bill before us contains a parental-notification provision for cases involving minors, but no other restrictions on a woman's access to abortion during the first trimester.The battle over the referendum is shaping up along the usual lines: those who advocate a woman's unrestricted right to abortion urging a ''yes'' vote; those who believe abortion is wrong under any circumstances urging ''no.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | April 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- This may finally be the year when the abortion issue comes front and center in presidential politics. If it happens, it could represent a significant threat to President Bush's re-election.The abortion question already has shown itself to be a volatile one in some legislative and gubernatoral campaigns, most notable in the 1989 elections of Govs. L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia and James Florio of New Jersey. But it has never been a prime factor in a presidential campaign because there always have been other issues that were either more immediate or more pertinent.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | October 23, 1991
Activists on both sides of the abortion issue in Maryland found reason for encouragement in Monday's federal court decision in Pennsylvania allowing restrictions on abortion.Opponents of abortion took the ruling as more evidence that the momentum in the fight is shifting dramatically to their side. Supporters of Maryland's new abortion law, set to be tested in a November 1992 referendum, said the ruling would prompt people who have never been active on the issue to join the campaign to keep abortion legal.
NEWS
By RICHARD HADDAD | May 19, 1992
As virtually every Maryland voter knows by now, a question regarding abortion will be on our ballot in November.We will be asked whether we wish to ratify a law crafted by our General Assembly to protect abortion rights in the state in the event the U.S. Supreme Court reverses its 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade. The bill before us contains a parental-notification provision for cases involving minors, but no other restrictions on a woman's access to abortion during the first trimester.The battle over the referendum is shaping up along the usual lines: those who advocate a woman's unrestricted right to abortion urging a ''yes'' vote; those who believe abortion is wrong under any circumstances urging ''no.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | August 21, 1993
The second shooting of an abortion doctor this year suggests a growing extremism in an anti-abortion movement that feels increasingly frustrated by the political process, some leaders on both sides of the issue said yesterday.Rebuffed by the U.S. Supreme Court, rejected by the White House and shunned by many state legislatures, some abortion opponents feel so frustrated by political obstacles that more violence is likely, they say.While major anti-abortion groups reject illegal activity, violent episodes continue.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and John W. Frece and Sandy Banisky and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 9, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Abortion-rights supporters won crucial preliminary Senate approval yesterday of a bill intended to keep most abortions legal in Maryland regardless of future U.S. Supreme Court actions.Debate on the legislation lasted a relatively brief 5 1/2 hours. Last year, an anti-abortion filibuster on a similar bill ran on for eight days, paralyzing the Senate and ultimately leading to the bill's death.Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., D-Prince George's, praised the Senate for its orderly handling of the bill and 13 attempted amendments.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | January 20, 1991
In hopes of winning passage this year of a bill that would keep most abortions legal, another abortion rights group has decided to join the legislative lobbying campaign in Annapolis.Choice PAC, a political action committee organized last spring to raise funds for candidates who support legal abortion, is forming a lobbying arm called Choice Committee to help press for approval of an abortion rights bill. Choice Committee will become a member of Marylanders for the Right to Choose, a coalition of about 100 groups.
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