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NEWS
April 6, 2012
With regard to Maryland's gas tax or any sales tax increase devoted to the same purpose, we don't trust Gov.Martin O'Malley, his successor or subsequent successors ("O'Malley looks at sales tax increase for roads," April 4). The transportation fund has been raided in the past, and we have no guarantees that it will not be raided in the future. If more revenue is needed to maintain our transportation infrastructure, I think most people would have no real problem with an increase in gas taxes - if the money raised was used for only transportation.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Prince George's County will become the state's second jurisdiction to stop honoring federal requests to hold illegal immigrants beyond their scheduled release unless agents can demonstrate it is likely that they have committed a crime, county officials said Thursday. County officials have issued the policy in response to a recent letter from the office of the Maryland attorney general, who opined that holding immigrants on "detainers" requested by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement without probable cause to believe they are criminals could violate the Fourth Amendment.
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FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
The folks at Facebook are thinking about lowering the age restrictions on the site to allow tweens. Officially, the site is closed to those under age 13, but many kids lie about their age to get in. My tween tried it and was kicked off the site. I'm not sure how the Facebook monitors uncovered his deception, but they did. A Facebook adviser says allowing tweens to join has nothing to do with the company's dismal performance on Wall Street after its stock market debut. Rather, since millions of tweens are already on the site, Facebook wants to make sure they are participating safely and with a parent's supervision, he says.
NEWS
September 23, 2014
There's simply no excuse for the Secret Service to have allowed an apparently deranged man to vault over the White House fence on Friday then sprint across the lawn and actually enter the president's residence through an unlocked door before he was tackled and apprehended. Heads should roll for a breach of security of this magnitude at what ought to be one of the country's most heavily guarded facilities. But it shouldn't come at the expense of the public's access to a historic site that symbolizes the nation's tradition of open governance and accountability to the citizens it serves.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
I am writing to correct the serious factual inaccuracies raised by Anne D. Neal in her commentary discussing the sale of Belward Farm by Elizabeth Beall Banks and her siblings ("Will Hopkins respect its donor's wishes?" Oct.17). It is important for me to do so as a lead steward for gifts to Johns Hopkins University, an institution that believes philanthropy is the collaboration of benefactors and institutions to do good in the world. Without trust and good will on both sides, that collaboration cannot occur and the world would be the worse for it. In this case, the Banks siblings and the university reached an agreement as to how the Montgomery County property was to be used.
NEWS
November 17, 2010
The residents near Morgan State University should know that obtaining residential parking restrictions will not solve their parking problems ("Morgan State neighbors protest student, staff parking on streets," Nov. 15). I live in residential parking zone #15 on the west side, near downtown. Monday through Friday mornings, as my neighbors leave for work, their spaces are occupied by cars showing visitor's parking passes which are borrowed or in some cases bought from neighborhood residents or renters.
EXPLORE
July 13, 2011
Equestrian questions WSSC horse-trail restrictions For decades, the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission has been a world-class institution, recognized for sound science and public caring. And for decades, WSSC generously let equestrians enjoy their Rocky Gorge Equestrian Trail, which is environmentally contoured, minimally eroding and generally far from the water. The trail was partly designed by WSSC's previous watershed experts (including Paul Hancock, Butch Abbott and Latty Iager)
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
A street performer is suing Ocean City , alleging that he has been harrassed and his First Amendment rights violated by an ordinance banning him from setting up at North Division Street and the Boardwalk. The performer, artist Mark Chase, who uses spray paint to create paintings, said in his complaint that the city was acting in retaliation, according to a report in The Dispatch . The City Council has cited safety concerns as the reason for restricting access to the area.
EXPLORE
May 8, 2013
The Howard County Board of Education is considering expanding its restrictions (Wellness Policy 9090) on the types of foods which can be served at school events to include those sold via "concessions, celebrations, and vending machines. " I believe they have failed to consider the negative impact this could have. Many of the fundraisers in our schools either directly or indirectly involve the sale of food, and much of this food falls outside the Wellness Policy. The money currently raised allows extracurricular activities such as sports and after prom parties to be safer and more fulfilling to our students.
NEWS
April 29, 2012
I take exception to the illogic displayed in columnist Marta H. Mossburg's recent commentary ("Biology really is destiny," April 25). She clearly understands nothing about women who oppose restrictions on contraceptives. Some of us think a prescription drug package on our health insurance should cover this prescription drug even if our employer thinks it shouldn't. And since when is a prescription drug plan "free?" Since when did employers belong between patients and their doctors?
TRAVEL
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Dumser's soft ice cream cones were still twirled perilously high, Thrashers' french fries were still doused in vinegar, and the surf was clear and cold as ever, but there were signs of change in Ocean City this summer. In some cases, literally: Town officials posted signs along the boardwalk asking visitors to refrain from using profanity. It was an unusual move in an interesting season at Maryland's most popular resort town. The planning board discussed curtailing weekly rentals in some neighborhoods but ultimately rejected the idea.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 6, 2014
Archery hunting for white-tailed deer opened statewide Friday and continues through Jan. 31. New this year, hunters in Region A may take only two antlerless deer for the license year. Also new, a hunter may not harvest more than two white-tailed deer within the yearly bag limit that have two or fewer points on each antler present. Any additional antlered deer taken within the legal seasons and bag limits must have at least three points on one antler. Junior Hunting License holders are exempt from the antler point restriction.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Water restrictions remain in place at the Hanover Square Apartments in Otterbein, where one resident was diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease in mid-July, according to the city's Health Department. The July 18 case is the only one associated with the 1 West Conway Street tower, where the city is monitoring efforts to test and clear the water, said Health Department spokesman Michael Schwartzberg. He said he did not have more information about the patient's status. Legionnaires' disease, a type of pneumonia, spreads through the inhalation of tiny droplets of contaminated water.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The lack of coherent rules for access to medical marijuana in Maryland is beyond absurd ( "Pot as medicine," Aug. 27). Medical marijuana has already been successfully implemented in many states across the country. Is Maryland so different that we can't adopt the same policies in use by other states? While there have been abuses of the system, they are relatively rare and non-threatening. Extending the logic applied by the Maryland commission on medical marijuana, we should ban swimming pools - responsible for hundreds of injuries and deaths every year - reduce the highway speed limit to 25 mph and make countless other changes to state law. Obviously, that's not the answer.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 29, 2014
President Obama, in his determination to get American foreign policy off what he has called "a perpetual war footing," must take care now not to box himself in with any more comments about "red lines" that restrict his options. As he appraises the growing threats to U.S. security from the Islamic State, the jihadist group that has taken over much of Syria and Iraq, he must make clear his continuing prerogative to take military action in legitimate self-defense. That remains so despite his repeated statements, made as if to ease fears at home and abroad, that there is "no military solution" to the crises in Iraq andUkraine.
TRAVEL
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The Coast Guard rescued three people near Ocean City 's inlet Wednesday when their 17-foot boat capsized, and a Virginia teen drowned in a rip current there Tuesday as town officials limited beachgoers to wading as Hurricane Cristobal continues to churn up Mid-Atlantic waters. This summer has been the deadliest in years for swimmers at Maryland's oceanfront resort, with the first reported drownings while lifeguards were on duty since 2007, according to the Ocean City Beach Patrol.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Motorists and boaters should prepare for restrictions in Annapolis for Independence Day activities on July 4. Festivities invlude a parade that will step off at 6:30 p.m. from Amos Garrett Boulevard and head down West Street and Main Street. Fireworks will be launched from a barge in the Annapolis Harbor at 9:15 p.m. Parking restrictions include bans on parking from 4 p.m. until 10:30 p.m. at City Dock, Main Street, Randall Street, Market Street, Severn Avenue between First Street and Burnside Street, the south side of Chesapeake Avenue and Chester Avenue between Riverview Avenue and Burnside Street, Bay Ridge Avenue between Sixth Street and Burnside Street and Bembe Beach Road from Awald to the end. Also, parking on Prince George Street between the water and College Avenue will be limited to residents only from noon until 11 p.m. Road closures include restrictions on vehicle traffic on the north side of the Eastport Peninsula between 5 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Roadblocks will be set up at 9 p.m. at Sixth Street and Severn Avenue, as the Spa Creek Bridge between Eastport and downtown will be closed to allow people to watch the fireworks show from the bridge.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The lack of coherent rules for access to medical marijuana in Maryland is beyond absurd ( "Pot as medicine," Aug. 27). Medical marijuana has already been successfully implemented in many states across the country. Is Maryland so different that we can't adopt the same policies in use by other states? While there have been abuses of the system, they are relatively rare and non-threatening. Extending the logic applied by the Maryland commission on medical marijuana, we should ban swimming pools - responsible for hundreds of injuries and deaths every year - reduce the highway speed limit to 25 mph and make countless other changes to state law. Obviously, that's not the answer.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Ocean City officials voted earlier this week to draft a law to restrict smoking on the beach and boardwalk beginning May 1, 2015. The proposed ordinance, which passed on a 4-3 vote at a work session for the town council on Tuesday, identifies a number of designated areas for smoking along the boardwalk and on the beach. Police will be responsible for enforcement of the law through verbal as well as written citations ranging from $25 to $1,000, a "worse-case scenario" for non-compliance.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
A state commission meeting this week to draft rules governing access to medical marijuana by patients and physicians has left advocates for the drug's therapeutic use wondering whether it will ever become available to those who need it. The commissioners need to balance the scientific and medical issues raised by medical marijuana against the legal constraints imposed by state and federal statutes. But in trying to walk a fine line between the two, the panel appears to have crafted rules that in some instances are so restrictive that many patients with illnesses that could be treated with the drug may never be able to get it. That would defeat the whole purpose of Maryland's medical marijuana law, which has already been delayed once since its passage in 2013.
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