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By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | December 12, 2009
The mother of Terrell Suggs' two children was granted a restraining order against the Ravens linebacker in a Baltimore District Court hearing that was devoid of abuse allegations and involved both sides working out custody and child support terms as they await the outcome of two civil lawsuits filed by the woman. Suggs' attorneys stressed that there was mutual agreement about the restraining order and said the 27-year-old football player denies any allegations of abuse involving Candace Williams, 26, who says he assaulted her on two occasions last month.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Sedation may have played a factor in the death of a 19-year-old hospital patient who was stunned by police during an altercation, a city council member said Friday. The teen died Thursday after falling into a coma after a May 7 altercation with Good Samaritan Hospital security guards and police, in which a city officer used a Taser. Police are investigating the man's death to determine whether police action was responsible. City Councilman Robert Curran, who represents the district where the teen died, said drugs the patient was given may have played a role in his death.
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SPORTS
By Justin Fenton and Mike Preston , and By Justin Fenton and Mike Preston | December 6, 2009
A Baltimore woman has obtained a temporary restraining order against Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs after filing a domestic violence complaint, according to online court records. On Friday, a court commissioner ordered Suggs to stay away from the woman and her home, pending a hearing this Friday. The order was granted after the woman, identified as Candace Williams, 26, filed a domestic violence complaint in Baltimore District Court. "I won't have anything to say," Suggs, 27, told The Baltimore Sun on Saturday.
NEWS
By a Sun staff writer | May 7, 2014
Hereford High School parents who are upset about plans to change the school schedule throughout the county next year have filed a complaint in Circuit Court, seeking a temporary restraining order. The parents had filed a legal petition with the Baltimore County school board last month, requesting to keep the school's current schedule. They said in a press release Wednesday that they are seeking the restraining order because the school board has not overturned Superintendent Dallas Dance's decision and because classes are currently being scheduled for next year.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2003
A Baltimore circuit judge handed a temporary legal victory yesterday to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in his battle against Mayor Martin O'Malley over management of the city's troubled social services agency. Judge Kaye A. Allison denied O'Malley's request for a temporary restraining order to prevent interim Department of Social Services Director Floyd Blair from making any changes to the 2,400-employee department until the court decides whether Blair's appointment was legal. In a lawsuit filed Sept.
NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
State police released audits yesterday showing that failures to properly log domestic restraining orders, to prevent accused abusers from buying guns, are more pervasive than officials previously acknowledged.All of the 21 jurisdictions audited by the state police frequently failed to correctly enter the protective orders, listing the wrong gender, name or race.The audits released yesterday were of mostly rural jurisdictions. The state police plan to begin auditing Baltimore City today."We are suffering from lack of staff, and I know people are tired of hearing that, but it is very much a reality," said George F. Johnson IV, president of the Maryland Sheriff's Association.
SPORTS
By Justin Fenton and Mike Preston , and Justin Fenton and Mike Preston , , justin.fenton@baltsun.com and mike.preston@baltsun.com | December 6, 2009
A Baltimore woman has obtained a temporary restraining order against Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs after filing a domestic violence complaint, according to online court records. On Friday, a court commissioner ordered Suggs to stay away from the woman and her home, pending a hearing this Friday. The order was granted after the woman, identified as Candace Williams, 26, filed a domestic violence complaint in Baltimore District Court. "I won't have anything to say," Suggs, 27, told The Baltimore Sun on Saturday.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1998
A Howard County pupil will not be allowed to wear an African-style head-wrap to school any time soon: She failed to win a temporary restraining order from a U.S. District Court judge in Baltimore yesterday.The pupil, 14-year-old Shermia Isaacs, says her right to freely express her Jamaican heritage is violated by a no-hats policy at Columbia's Harper's Choice Middle School -- a policy that school officials interpreted to include her cloth head covering.But Judge J. Frederick Motz indicated that the policy is content-neutral and reasonably related to an educational purpose, according to Patti Caplan, a spokeswoman for Howard County schools.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
Poor handwriting, incomplete information, inadequate forms and lack of automation are obstacles that make restraining orders ineffective and give accused abusers the opportunity to purchase handguns, court and law enforcement officials said yesterday. But the state has taken an initial step toward improving processing to help keep victims safe with its first in a series of training seminars, which began yesterday with a seminar for supervisors of data entry clerks, sheriff's deputies, prosecutors and court employees involved in the paperwork.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2004
A teacher who alleged that ousted Annapolis High School principal Deborah Williams tried to run her vehicle off the road last week withdrew her request for a restraining order in court yesterday. An attorney for Spanish teacher Milagros M. Cancel declined to comment on why her client dropped her civil complaint against Williams, who was forced out of her job last week for unrelated reasons. Outside court yesterday, Williams declined to comment about the case. She hugged friends and was met with applause from about 30 supporters who attended the brief morning hearing.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 15, 2014
"If at my convenience I might break them (laws), what would be their worth?" -- Charlotte Bronte, "Jane Eyre" We've come a long way since Justice Charles Evans Hughes remarked a century ago that "the Constitution is what the judges say it is. " Or have we? According to the Galen Institute, a nonprofit public policy research organization based in Alexandria, Va., "more than 27 significant changes already have been made to Obamacare: at least 10 that President Obama has made unilaterally, 15 that Congress has passed and the president has signed, and 2 by the Supreme Court.
NEWS
By David Horsey | December 24, 2013
For 12 years, America's national security apparatus has grown like kudzu on steroids, but, finally, President Obama may soon start trimming it back to preserve at least a small space for personal privacy in the United States. A panel of five independent experts appointed by the president has come up with 46 recommendations that would set limits on the broad authority of the National Security Agency to engage in cyber spying. The panel is suggesting enhanced oversight and new checks on such things as the NSA's spy operations against foreign leaders and cyber attacks abroad.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
An Anne Arundel County judge Thursday denied a request to stop the Maryland State Police from using data entry workers to process the background checks of gun buyers. A coalition of four gun-rights group and an anonymous man from Anne Arundel County filed a lawsuit this week against the state police, alleging privacy breaches after the state deployed dozens of workers to input sensitive information about gun buyers into a database. The groups alleged that information was transmitted over an unsecured network that could have left vulnerable thousands of Maryland gun buyers to identity theft.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
Maryland is on the right track in trying to do something to cut hospital costs ("Hospitals uneasy over rate plan," April 7). A state proposal would establish a plan to tie medical spending to the growth of the economy. The plan, according to your story, "is making hospital executives uneasy. " Well, let me tell those executives that their present hospital costs are making me uneasy. In early March, I had an allergic reaction to "Z-pack," an antibiotic prescribed for a virus that had been diagnosed as a bacterial infection I suffered for three days with no appetite and little sleep and finally had to go to the emergency room at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
By Theresa Vargas, The Washington Post | March 28, 2013
Robert Ethan Saylor didn't like to be touched, and suddenly an off-duty deputy had his hands on him. Within moments, two more deputies would grab him, the four men would fall in a heap on the floor, and Saylor, who had been shouting and resisting their attempts to restrain him, would grow quiet and still. More than two months after a man with Down syndrome died at the hands of three off-duty Frederick County sheriff's deputies, these details about his death emerged in an autopsy report released this week.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Baltimore is wasting about $400,000 every month it does not install a new phone system, a lawyer for Comptroller Joan M. Pratt argued in court Thursday. But the mayor's lawyers argued that Pratt has no legal right to sue the city because she is a city officer. Pratt and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake have been sparring for months over who should upgrade the city's phone system, leading to a war of words, an investigation by the city's inspector general and now a court battle. "The city is throwing money down the drain," said Pratt's attorney, Charles G. Bernstein, a former city judge who works for Orioles owner Peter Angelos' law firm.
BUSINESS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
Saying he cannot get The Examiner to stop throwing unwanted papers in his driveway each morning, a Baltimore lawyer has asked the Baltimore County Circuit Court for a temporary restraining order to force an end to the deliveries. "They're trespassing, technically," said Joel L. Levin, referring to the carriers who deliver the papers in his Pikesville neighborhood. Almost a month ago, he said, he began calling the paper's circulation department to have them stopped, but they keep coming.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1998
A dispute between one of Baltimore's most prominent churches and a well-known city real estate agent and church benefactor who alleges that the church's pastor might have misappropriated money landed in Circuit Court yesterday.Officials of Douglas Memorial Community Church were seeking a restraining order against 35-year parishioner James Crockett, whom they say became disruptive during a churchwide business meeting Jan. 17 and appeared to threaten their pastor.Crockett, 73, says he was seeking answers to questions about the church's finances, including $6,000 in legal fees for an unspecified matter that were paid on behalf of Douglas Memorial's pastor, the Rev. Brad R. Braxton.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Baltimore Comptroller Joan M. Pratt filed a lawsuit Friday seeking to stop Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's technology office from installing a new phone system, alleging the administration used an "underhanded, illegal technique" to bypass the competitive bidding process. The suit seeks a temporary restraining order against the Rawlings-Blake administration to prevent the Mayor's Office of Information Technology from using existing contracts with Digicon Corp. to install a Voice over Internet Protocol phone system.
NEWS
June 14, 2012
Maryland is the only state in the nation to enjoy a federal exemption that allows it to regulate how much hospitals can charge patients, much like the state public service commission regulates utility rates. Under the system administered by state's Health Services Cost Review Commission, hospital patients are charged the same rate no matter where they seek care, and health insurance companies all contribute equally to help cover the cost of uncompensated care for people who lack the means to pay. The result has been that hospital costs as well as overall spending on health care have risen more slowly in Maryland than anywhere else in the country.
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