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Restoring The Bay

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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | January 5, 2009
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and several fishing groups will file suit today accusing the federal government of shirking its legal responsibilities to clean up the troubled estuary, officials of the Annapolis-based environmental group said yesterday. The lawsuit, to be filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, contends that the Environmental Protection Agency has failed to comply with the Clean Water Act and with multiple interstate agreements the agency has signed over the past 25 years aimed at restoring the bay. The suit contends that the federal government's inaction has led to the continued decline of the bay's water quality and harmed its crabs, oysters and fish - and the people who make a living from the bay or seek to enjoy its diminished bounty.
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NEWS
By Jenn Aiosa and Mark Bryer | September 23, 2013
It's been five years since the Chesapeake Bay blue crab fishery was declared a disaster, and despite progress using science-based guidelines for protecting female crabs, the iconic Chesapeake crustacean is still not out of the woods. The Baltimore Sun's call for management change ("Blue outlook for blue crabs," Sept. 18) hits the mark; the bay's blue crab needs better management based on baywide total catch limits, allocations among the states and licensed fishermen and much greater accountability for all blue crab harvesting.
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NEWS
May 28, 1992
For those concerned about the plight of the Chesapeake Bay, it is a jolt to realize that the Chesapeake Bay Foundation is only 25 years old. It is hard to imagine how the bay could have survived the onslaught of pollution and degradation without its pioneering work.No discussion of the bay's past, its present or its future can be conducted without heavy reliance on the foundation's research. Thousands have been introduced to the bay's wonders, its resources and its troubles by foundation lecturers or field trips.
NEWS
By Roy A. Hoagland | October 11, 2012
When the Chesapeake Bay restoration program began in earnest in 1983, with the signing of the first Chesapeake Bay Agreement, it was hailed as the beginning of a new era of interjurisdictional partnering to save a national treasure. And so it was. With the recognition that a "cooperative approach" was needed "to fully address the extent, complexity, and sources of pollutants entering the Bay," Pennsylvania Gov. Richard Thornburgh, Maryland Gov. Harry Hughes, Virginia Gov. Chuck Robb, D.C. Mayor Marion Barry and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator William Ruckelshaus created the Chesapeake Executive Council with a commitment to "assess and oversee implementation of coordinated plans to improve and protect the water quality and living resources of the Chesapeake Bay. " This unique partnership of federal, state and city governments, of Republican and Democratic leadership, grew to be recognized internationally as one of the most successful multijurisdictional restoration efforts in the world.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2002
The Chesapeake Bay is still ailing and would have declined further if the drought hadn't cut the flow of contaminants in the past year, according to an assessment by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. The foundation issued its fifth annual report on the bay yesterday, scoring the nation's largest estuary at 27 on a scale of 100, the same score as last year. Because of increased dumping of toxic chemicals, the bay would have scored worse if the region had had a normal amount of rainfall, according to Will C. Baker, foundation president.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | November 5, 1992
The effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay moved upstream yesterday, with the setting of pollution-reduction goals for each of 10 river systems in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia that feed into the troubled estuary.Bay-region officials announced they had agreed on how to divide responsibility for making a 40 percent reduction by the end of the decade in the amount of nutrients from sewage and farm runoff that are fouling the Chesapeake.An overabundance of nitrogen and phosphorus causes massive "blooms" of algae in the bay during spring and summer.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
HOW TO PUT in perspective the environmental accomplishments of the General Assembly session that ended Monday? To the legislature and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., thanks for a job well done. Congratulations on graduating from high school. But let's talk about that Ph.D. you must earn very soon. At some political risk, Ehrlich did the right thing, imposing a $30-a-year charge on households hooked to sewers, to pay for much-needed upgrades in sewage treatment plants. Legislators made it better and fairer, imposing a $30 annual charge on Marylanders who live in areas without sewers as well.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2003
FEW WOULD argue with the notion that the Chesapeake Bay Foundation is a reason to feel optimistic about restoring the bay to health. With 100,000 dues-paying members, annual revenues of $18 million to $20 million, nationally recognized education programs and science-based campaigns to cut pollution and restore habitat, what's to argue? How about whether it's actually going to work? So says Howard R. Ernst in Chesapeake Bay Blues -- Science, Politics and the Struggle to Save the Bay, due in bookstores next month.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | July 7, 1993
Declaring the Chesapeake Bay restoration effort at "a turning point," the chief of the Environmental Protection Agency pledged continued federal support yesterday after meeting with Maryland environmentalists and the state's two U.S. senators.Carol M. Browner, in her first visit to Annapolis since being named EPA administrator by President Clinton, said that while the bay's decline appears to have been halted in the past 10 years, restoring the estuary to its historic vitality will take a long time and even greater effort.
NEWS
March 16, 2003
HERE'S THE problem: Chesapeake Bay crabs are overfished. They need a break to relax, recover, make love, make babies, grow big and start the cycle over and over again. But Chesapeake Bay watermen say they are underfishing. They need to catch more crabs, and catch them younger and smaller, in order to make a living and keep up their own cycle of love and babies and life. Putting aside the bias of our own yearning for a bushel of those steamed delicacies after a snowbound winter, this is a dilemma that cries out for a third way. Yielding to the watermen, as Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. proposes to do, might provide some relief in the short term but could ultimately ensure the demise of their livelihood and way of life.
NEWS
May 14, 2011
The Chesapeake Bay is 200 miles long and 35 miles wide at its widest point. It's the nation's largest estuary, and 17 million people live within its 64,000 square mile watershed, which includes six states and the District of Colombia. But unfortunately, over time the bay's ecosystem has deteriorated because of excess nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment entering the water as a consequence of human practices. In December 2010, the EPA issued its final Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Limits — a historic and comprehensive "pollution diet" for the bay and its tributaries.
NEWS
By James B. Hale and Capital News Service | November 21, 2009
Annapolis intends to test a floating island in a local lagoon that, if successful, could help clean the water in the Chesapeake Bay, according to Mayor Ellen O. Moyer. Moyer also announced an eco-friendly renovation of a city parking lot and the creation of a private-public partnership to offer property owners tax-exempt, low- interest loans to install energy-efficient equipment. The floating island, which would absorb nutrients from the water, will be tested in a lagoon in Back Creek Nature Park.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | January 5, 2009
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and several fishing groups will file suit today accusing the federal government of shirking its legal responsibilities to clean up the troubled estuary, officials of the Annapolis-based environmental group said yesterday. The lawsuit, to be filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, contends that the Environmental Protection Agency has failed to comply with the Clean Water Act and with multiple interstate agreements the agency has signed over the past 25 years aimed at restoring the bay. The suit contends that the federal government's inaction has led to the continued decline of the bay's water quality and harmed its crabs, oysters and fish - and the people who make a living from the bay or seek to enjoy its diminished bounty.
NEWS
By Roy Gothie | October 17, 2008
The modern concept of property rights substantially contributes to the Chesapeake Bay's continued decline. At this point, tinkering around the edges of the issue with minor changes to laws and regulations will no longer be enough to save the bay. Only a societal decision to redefine an individual's rights regarding property can restore the bay and other critical ecosystems. Developers, industrialists, homeowners and farmers have long assumed that the core bundle of rights attached to a piece of property exists to benefit the property owners.
NEWS
By David Bancroft | October 3, 2008
This two-part commentary from Bay Journal News Service presents the views of the Republican and Democratic candidates for president on their policies regarding the Chesapeake Bay region. For those of us in the Mid-Atlantic region who value clean rivers and streams and want to preserve our quality of life, the decision to vote for Sen. Barack Obama is an easy one. Mr. Obama's platform recognizes the unique nature of the Chesapeake watershed, and he is dedicated to providing the resources to clean up the water flowing into the bay. The Obama Democratic platform states, "We support a comprehensive solution for restoring our national treasures - such as the Great Lakes, Everglades and Chesapeake Bay - including expanded scientific research and protections for species and habitats there."
NEWS
By Donald F. Boesch | October 9, 2007
We know that the average water temperature of the Chesapeake Bay has increased by nearly 2 degrees Fahrenheit since 1960. If global warming continues unabated, it is likely to rise by an additional 5 or more degrees by the end of this century. We know that the bay's sea level has risen by a foot and a half since the 1930s. Climate science tells us that we should prepare for an additional 2 feet to 4 feet before the next century. We know that over the last four centuries, the bay has lost about 10 inhabited islands to erosion and a rising sea level.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | March 21, 1993
The commercial fisherman and the recreational fisherman sat side by side. That alone was noteworthy.What was "unprecedented," using one man's term, was why these traditional foes had come together yesterday for a meeting billed as Chesapeake Fishermen's Summit: To join forces in cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.The Chesapeake Bay Foundation organized the summit at the Governor Calvert House, an Annapolis inn next to the State House. Bill Goldsborough, fisheries scientist for the foundation, described the gathering as "unprecedented."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | December 18, 1991
Bountiful populations of fish and oysters and underwater grasses may never return to the Chesapeake Bay unless leaders of the bay cleanup consider involving more states and making more drastic cuts in air pollution.An interstate panel, convened this year to evaluate how the bay cleanup has worked since a 1987 agreement by Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia, will meet tomorrow to give its preliminary report.What is becoming clear, scientists and environmental regulators say, is that the amount of pollutants from New York, West Virginia and Delaware is far greater than was imagined in 1987.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad | July 15, 2007
Recent reports on the health of the Chesapeake Bay paint a dismal picture. An Environmental Protection Agency Chesapeake Bay Program report noted that water quality has shown little progress since 1985, and levels of nitrogen and phosphorus - the nutrient pollutants that are the focus of cleanup efforts - show no real long-term improvement. Evidence of these excessive nutrients showed up in recent large fish kills in Baltimore's harbor and in Annapolis' Weems Creek. Bay grasses, essential for crabs and fish, are far short of the goal of 185,000 acres set in 2000 by the Chesapeake Bay Agreement, which drives bay restoration.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
HOW TO PUT in perspective the environmental accomplishments of the General Assembly session that ended Monday? To the legislature and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., thanks for a job well done. Congratulations on graduating from high school. But let's talk about that Ph.D. you must earn very soon. At some political risk, Ehrlich did the right thing, imposing a $30-a-year charge on households hooked to sewers, to pay for much-needed upgrades in sewage treatment plants. Legislators made it better and fairer, imposing a $30 annual charge on Marylanders who live in areas without sewers as well.
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