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Restorative Justice

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By Barbara Sugarman Grochal | January 27, 2014
Restorative justice has been around for centuries both nationally and internationally and has been shown to be effective and to provide positive outcomes among both offenders and victims. Yet, the restorative approach remains underused by our current justice system, which instead relies on larger and larger prisons to house disproportionate numbers of black male youth. Restorative justice is based on involving offenders in determining outcomes and rehabilitating them through reconciliation with their victims.
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NEWS
July 17, 2014
Your editorial, "Breaking a vicious cycle" (July 14) hits the nail on the head. With U.S. youth incarceration rates the highest in the world - greater than the rates of the other 10 most developed countries combined - something is tragically wrong. It is disturbing that once incarcerated as a youth, even for less serious offenses, these individuals have an increased likelihood of returning to prison and a decreased chance of securing gainful employment later in life. As you point out, the Youth PROMISE Act offers a more effective approach to juvenile crime.
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NEWS
September 19, 2004
Legion post seeks participants for oratorical contest American Legion Adams, Hanna & Moore Memorial Post 156 will sponsor an oratorical contest for high school students early next year. Those who proceed to the national rounds of the competition could win college scholarships. Students interested in competing should write to American Legion Adams, Hanna & Moore Memorial Post 156, P.O. Box 2416, Ellicott City 21042, or call 410-730-3224 or 410-730-8338 by Saturday. Workshops scheduled on restorative justice The Mediation and Conflict Resolution Center at Howard Community College will present the first of six regional restorative justice workshops form 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday in Room 100 of the college's Instructional Lab Building, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia.
NEWS
July 11, 2014
For far too many young people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, an arrest or conviction for even a minor, non-violent offense can become a one-way ticket to a shrunken future that slams the door on opportunities for the rest of their lives. Being arrested as a teen increases a person's chances of being arrested again as an adult, and teenagers sentenced to jail are more likely to be incarcerated later in life as well. Add to that the nation's harsh drug laws and stiff mandatory minimum sentencing policies and it's no wonder America locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world.
NEWS
February 24, 2013
Regarding your report on the guilty plea of alleged school shooter Robert Gladden Jr., I am a firm believer that before judges and prosecutors send a defendant to jail, they should spend some time incarcerated themselves to experience the conditions a prisoner faces ("Gladden pleads guilty in shooting," Feb. 20). Mr. Gladden, a minor, made his plea in adult court. This is a travesty of justice for a 15-year-old who was never given a break in life. After following his case, it appears to me that he is a troubled teen who desperately needs help.
NEWS
July 11, 2014
For far too many young people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, an arrest or conviction for even a minor, non-violent offense can become a one-way ticket to a shrunken future that slams the door on opportunities for the rest of their lives. Being arrested as a teen increases a person's chances of being arrested again as an adult, and teenagers sentenced to jail are more likely to be incarcerated later in life as well. Add to that the nation's harsh drug laws and stiff mandatory minimum sentencing policies and it's no wonder America locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
Your editorial, "Breaking a vicious cycle" (July 14) hits the nail on the head. With U.S. youth incarceration rates the highest in the world - greater than the rates of the other 10 most developed countries combined - something is tragically wrong. It is disturbing that once incarcerated as a youth, even for less serious offenses, these individuals have an increased likelihood of returning to prison and a decreased chance of securing gainful employment later in life. As you point out, the Youth PROMISE Act offers a more effective approach to juvenile crime.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1998
In one of its first steps to improve life in Baltimore, the local arm of billionaire George Soros' philanthropy has awarded almost $500,000 in fellowships to 10 area residents.The Open Society Institute-Baltimore has awarded "community fellowships" -- each worth $48,750 -- for the recipients to improve inner-city life in ways such as raising voices in song, raising vegetables or raising the consciousness of juvenile offenders.The 18-month fellowships, announced yesterday, are a key part of Soros' plan to spend $25 million in five years to help the poor in Baltimore.
NEWS
September 18, 2007
The nomination of former federal Judge Michael B. Mukasey to replace Alberto R. Gonzales as attorney general has all the signs of a rare conciliatory gesture by President Bush toward congressional Democrats. Both sides should build on this cooperative spirit to finally work out an arrangement by which the administration would provide the documents and testimony necessary to complete a congressional investigation of political abuse of prosecutorial powers during the ill-fated Gonzales regime.
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
The Harford County Department of Community Services Local Management Board has awarded $12,000 to the Harford County Sheriff's Office to conduct a teen court. Teen Court, piloted in the spring, provides first-time, non-violent youth offenders with a second chance. Offenders agree to participate in the Teen Court program, and if successful, avoid becoming involved in the juvenile justice system. Harford County District Court Judge Susan Hazlett presides over the court with a jury comprised of teens from throughout the county.
NEWS
By Barbara Sugarman Grochal | January 27, 2014
Restorative justice has been around for centuries both nationally and internationally and has been shown to be effective and to provide positive outcomes among both offenders and victims. Yet, the restorative approach remains underused by our current justice system, which instead relies on larger and larger prisons to house disproportionate numbers of black male youth. Restorative justice is based on involving offenders in determining outcomes and rehabilitating them through reconciliation with their victims.
NEWS
February 24, 2013
Regarding your report on the guilty plea of alleged school shooter Robert Gladden Jr., I am a firm believer that before judges and prosecutors send a defendant to jail, they should spend some time incarcerated themselves to experience the conditions a prisoner faces ("Gladden pleads guilty in shooting," Feb. 20). Mr. Gladden, a minor, made his plea in adult court. This is a travesty of justice for a 15-year-old who was never given a break in life. After following his case, it appears to me that he is a troubled teen who desperately needs help.
NEWS
September 18, 2007
The nomination of former federal Judge Michael B. Mukasey to replace Alberto R. Gonzales as attorney general has all the signs of a rare conciliatory gesture by President Bush toward congressional Democrats. Both sides should build on this cooperative spirit to finally work out an arrangement by which the administration would provide the documents and testimony necessary to complete a congressional investigation of political abuse of prosecutorial powers during the ill-fated Gonzales regime.
NEWS
September 19, 2004
Legion post seeks participants for oratorical contest American Legion Adams, Hanna & Moore Memorial Post 156 will sponsor an oratorical contest for high school students early next year. Those who proceed to the national rounds of the competition could win college scholarships. Students interested in competing should write to American Legion Adams, Hanna & Moore Memorial Post 156, P.O. Box 2416, Ellicott City 21042, or call 410-730-3224 or 410-730-8338 by Saturday. Workshops scheduled on restorative justice The Mediation and Conflict Resolution Center at Howard Community College will present the first of six regional restorative justice workshops form 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday in Room 100 of the college's Instructional Lab Building, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1998
In one of its first steps to improve life in Baltimore, the local arm of billionaire George Soros' philanthropy has awarded almost $500,000 in fellowships to 10 area residents.The Open Society Institute-Baltimore has awarded "community fellowships" -- each worth $48,750 -- for the recipients to improve inner-city life in ways such as raising voices in song, raising vegetables or raising the consciousness of juvenile offenders.The 18-month fellowships, announced yesterday, are a key part of Soros' plan to spend $25 million in five years to help the poor in Baltimore.
EXPLORE
February 7, 2012
The Harford County Teen Court will be offering training for youth and adult volunteers on Thursday, Feb. 9, at 4:30 p.m. at the Harford County District Court at 2 S. Bond St. in Bel Air. The Teen Court was piloted last spring and is approaching its first year of operation as a diversion program that provides first-time, non-violent youth offenders with a second chance. Offenders agree to participate in the Teen Court program and, if successful, avoid becoming involved in the juvenile justice system.
NEWS
January 15, 2013
The Harford County Teen Court is looking for adult and teen volunteers to participate in the youth diversion program run in cooperation with the local courts, social services and community service agencies, police and the county school system. The Harford County Teen Court was piloted in the spring of 2011as a diversion program to provide first-time, non-violent youth offenders with a second chance. Offenders agree to participate in the Teen Court program and, if successful, avoid becoming involved in the juvenile justice system.
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