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Restoration Project

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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
The Perry Hall Mansion, one of Baltimore County's most historically significant buildings, sits on a hill in a fairly fresh coat of white stucco, poised between redemption and decay.  The new stucco is already peeling in spots and the straw-colored grass is long enough to bury your boots. While there are new windows, heating, air conditioning, electrical and fire alarm systems, wallpaper is peeling everywhere, plaster is cracking, and the place seems abandoned behind a wire fence and forbidding sign: "Baltimore County Property.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The scaffolds enshrouding Baltimore's Washington Monument offer passersby a temporary skyline change, but some residents and small-business owners in the Mount Vernon neighborhood worry about the two-year project's impact on their lifestyles and livelihoods. The monument, a central draw to the city's cultural hub, was closed in 2010 after an engineering study conducted by the nonprofit Mount Vernon Place Conservancy deemed it unsafe. The $5 million renovation effort will address structural deficiencies, clean grime off the monument, and include new roofing and electrical system, said Lance Humphries, chair of the conservancy's restoration committee.
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NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | November 15, 1990
The man in plum brocade and ruffles stood in the sunlit dining room of the Charles Carroll House in Annapolis and watched the waters of Spa Creek sparkling below."
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 28, 2012
The Chesapeake Bay cleanup got a shot in the arm today (Tuesday, 8/28), as federal and nonprofit officials announced grants totaling $9.2 million for planting trees, restoring wetlands, installing rain gardens and other projects across the watershed. The announcement was made at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, where one of the grants will help replace an existing parking lot with rain-absorbing "pervious concrete," intended to reduce polluted storm-water runoff.  The press conference was planned to highlight such urban water-quality efforts, with more than $800,000 in grants being handed out for projects in the Baltimore area alone.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | May 24, 1993
For most people, the idea of sailing on a wooden boat seems almost, well, archaic.After all, there are all those new, shiny fiberglass boats with more buttons and gadgets than the latest VCR.But for Ray Hartjen of Port Tobacco, a word like archaic would never enter his vocabulary when talking about wooden boats. On the contrary, Mr. Hartjen uses words like "majestic" or "historic."It is the love of wooden boats that has brought Mr. Hartjen to Eastport to lead the restoration of a 55-year-old, 42-foot yawl -- a two-masted, fore- and aft-rigged sailing vessel that was donated to him."
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | April 22, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley, Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon and children from Maree Farring Elementary School kicked off Earth Week by breaking ground yesterday on an environmental education center that will help anchor a $153 million waterfront restoration project near Baltimore's Brooklyn and Curtis Bay communities. The cleanup of 22 acres of shoreline along the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River - one of the most contaminated areas in the city's harbor - has led to recovery by the Maryland Port Administration of 30,000 tons of trash, roughly the same weight as 4,000 buses, including timber, concrete, pollutant-containing electrical equipment, more than two dozen shipwrecks and nearly 200,000 gallons of petroleum-tainted water.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton has decided to endorse a huge project to protect the Everglades by spending hundreds of millions of dollars to take farmland out of production and restore a more natural flow of fresh water across Florida's swampy southern half, according to senior administration officials.Environmentalists have been urging such a project for years over intense opposition from the region's sugar cane growers.It would be one of the biggest ecological restoration efforts ever undertaken, the administration officials said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | August 12, 2007
The solid wood beams supporting the new pale green metal roof over the late Nancy Smith's 19th-century Blandair mansion in east Columbia are better than new. "White oak will just last forever, if it's old timber," said Chris McGuigan, the National Park Service's project manager on the $1.6 million restoration project - the first phase of a $14 million project to convert the overgrown farm into a park. That's why the Park Service used wood from old barns - white oak and pine that came from old-growth trees.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
The Historical Society of Carroll County recently completed a major restoration of the Sherman-Fisher-Shellman House on Main Street in Westminster.This project was selected for a 1991 Historic Preservation Project Award from the Maryland Historical Trust in recognition of the outstanding quality of the restoration. An open house in honorof receiving this award will be on Saturday, May 18.The educational program at the house museum provides many insights about the early history of Carroll County.
NEWS
By Winyan Soo Hoo and Winyan Soo Hoo,Special to Baltimoresun.com | June 13, 2005
Baltimore County Executive Jim Smith and other officials plan to celebrate the completion of a stream restoration project for Minebank Run -- a Gunpowder Falls tributary that leads to the Chesapeake Bay -- on Tuesday morning at Cromwell Valley Park. The Baltimore County Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management completed the $3.1 million project hoping to restore the banks of the local tributary, which has a history of major erosion and flooding problems, according to officials.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
Imagine driving into Annapolis along Rowe Boulevard or sailing into the city's harbor, glancing up toward the tiered State House dome, and seeing that it's colored not in the brick red and Colonial white you've known your entire life, but in lemon gold, muted blue and honey bordering on apricot. Sound like something from a weird dream? It's not. When George Washington strode inside to resign his commission in 1783, when the Continental Congress ratified the Treaty of Paris there, ending the Revolutionary War, and when the British sailed up the Chesapeake to sack Baltimore in 1814, those were the colors they saw. So found a team of workers as they stripped away paint layers during an $800,000 maintenance project this summer.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
For years, Dr. Martina Callum has traveled the country and the world as a locum tenens physician, providing temporary health care in communities where few doctors exist. But after months on the road, she'd return home to an apartment in White Marsh that could barely hold the furniture, art and other items that she had accumulated over a lifetime. "I was flying back and forth to places like Alaska and paying a lot of rent here," says Callum, who was raised in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
The Perry Hall Mansion, one of Baltimore County's most historically significant buildings, sits on a hill in a fairly fresh coat of white stucco, poised between redemption and decay.  The new stucco is already peeling in spots and the straw-colored grass is long enough to bury your boots. While there are new windows, heating, air conditioning, electrical and fire alarm systems, wallpaper is peeling everywhere, plaster is cracking, and the place seems abandoned behind a wire fence and forbidding sign: "Baltimore County Property.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2010
Almost 300 years ago, Rachael Howard and her betrothed, Charles Ridgely, were given a large tract of land in Southwest Baltimore as a wedding gift from her father. Decades later in 1798, Michael Warner, a politician from a wealthy local family, built a brick home on a section of that land, which by then had become known as Ridgely's Delight. Today, the owners of Warner's historic Federal-era home operate a bed-and-breakfast from the restored 8,000-square-foot mansion that they have named "Rachael's Dowry.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | April 3, 2010
Like much of the other containers and food scraps from the North Baltimore farm-to-table restaurant Woodberry Kitchen, the oyster shells don't go in the trash. The raw bar castoffs - about 2,000 per week - are sent to an Eastern Shore oyster hatchery and then back to the Chesapeake Bay. The restaurant is one of about 20 in the local food industry working with the University of Maryland and a nonprofit group to recycle the calcium carbonate encasements for use by another generation of bivalves.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | April 2, 2010
Like much of the other containers and food scraps from the North Baltimore farm-to-table restaurant Woodberry Kitchen, the oyster shells don't go in the trash. The raw bar castoffs — about 2,000 per week — are sent to an Eastern Shore oyster hatchery and then back to the Chesapeake Bay. The restaurant is one of about 20 in the local food industry working with the University of Maryland and a nonprofit group to recycle the calcium carbonate encasements for use by another generation of bivalves.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1999
Officials at Fort Meade are working on a restoration project they hope will get them out of trouble with state and federal authorities and wrapping up plans to transfer Tipton Airport to Anne Arundel County for good.In an agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment that was announced last week, the post's Environmental Management Office will reshape tributaries and place small water-loving plants along the banks of Franklin Branch to reduce runoff into that waterway and into Burba Lake, post officials said.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | April 22, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley, Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon and children from Maree Farring Elementary School kicked off Earth Week by breaking ground yesterday on an environmental education center that will help anchor a $153 million waterfront restoration project near Baltimore's Brooklyn and Curtis Bay communities. The cleanup of 22 acres of shoreline along the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River - one of the most contaminated areas in the city's harbor - has led to recovery by the Maryland Port Administration of 30,000 tons of trash, roughly the same weight as 4,000 buses, including timber, concrete, pollutant-containing electrical equipment, more than two dozen shipwrecks and nearly 200,000 gallons of petroleum-tainted water.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | September 17, 2007
Every day for the past year, biologist Eric Schott turned over mossy rocks in Stony Run, looking for hope. Finally, this summer, he and other members of the Jones Falls Watershed Association, a volunteer conservation group that protects the 3.3-mile creek in Baltimore, found it. Here, hope croaks. Frogs - tadpoles to palm-size juveniles and full-grown bullfrogs - have been seen and heard for the first time in more than five years in this threatened streambed, said Schott, a biologist with the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute who has tracked Stony Run's condition.
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