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By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
Two Owings Mills-based mortgage firms accused of running a "foreclosure rescue scheme" have agreed to pay $110,000 in cash restitution as part of a settlement that saved the Ellicott City homes of two elderly women, one of whom has since died after becoming a victim. Poor health and related bills left the two women behind on mortgage payments in 2006, when they responded to a refinancing offer contained in packets labeled "Your Best Hope has just arrived." But instead of a promised rescue from the brink of foreclosure, the women found that they had unwittingly signed away the titles to their homes and were facing eviction.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
The owner of a Columbia medical practice was ordered to pay more than $142,600 in restitution and other costs for failing to remit employee contributions and loan repayments to the company's 401K plan, the U.S. Department of Labor said Thursday. David O. Nyanjom, Laura Nyanjom, Pulmonary Disease & Critical Care Associates and the company's 401 (k) plan must pay $66,474 in unremitted contributions and payments and the balance in pre-judgment interest and costs of appointing an independent fiduciary according to a consent judgment in a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
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NEWS
August 18, 1992
Some disgruntled staffers have charged that top officials of the Resolution Trust Corp., the government agency responsible for cleaning up the nation's failed banks and thrifts, is easing its commitment to collect damages from former directors. Their congressional testimony suggests the RTC is no longer interested in seeking restitution.Three lawyers testified that subtle changes in the agency's guidelines have thwarted their recent recovery efforts. Instead of going after people whose thievery, negligence or inattention contributed to the collapse of S&Ls, three RTC lawyers said they were subjected to political pressure not to pursue certain cases.
FEATURES
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
A Perry Hall man was sentenced Friday to 121/2 years in prison and ordered to pay more than $42 million in restitution after being convicted of selling $9 million worth of fake biodiesel fuel credits to oil companies and commodities brokers. Rodney R. Hailey, 34, was found guilty in June of eight counts of wire fraud, 32 counts of money laundering and two counts of violating the Clean Air Act. Hailey operated Clean Green Fuel, a company that purportedly created renewable fuel from waste cooking oil but sold credits for more than 23 million gallons of biodiesel he never made.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 9, 1997
A former Baltimore County firefighter was ordered yesterday to pay $37,590 in restitution and serve 90 days of home detention for fraudulently obtaining health benefits for his ex-wife, whom he divorced 12 years ago, the state attorney general's office said.Charles C. Carter, 57, of the 8000 block of Pine Ridge Road, Pasadena, also received a two-year suspended sentence and five years' probation.Pub Date: 12/09/97
NEWS
June 20, 1997
A Westminster woman, found guilty yesterday of violating probation, was given a one-year suspended sentence, ordered to perform 62 hours of community service by Dec. 31 and to pay $100 restitution within 60 days or go to jail.Probation officials said Wendy J. Jirsa, 24, of the 1200 block of Guadelupe Drive has paid no restitution and completed three hours of community service. She was ordered to perform 65 hours of community service after being convicted of battery and trespassing in 1995.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | April 6, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Cottman Transmission Inc. customers who think they were overcharged for repairs stand to get some money back, thanks to a Court of Special Appeals decision.Maryland's second-highest court held that the company should have been ordered to pay restitution to customers by a Baltimore Circuit judge who ruled in 1989 that Cottman engaged in deceptive trade practices.The court also ordered that Cottman, based in Fort Washington, Pa., be tried on charges that it tricked customers into paying for unnecessary repairs.
NEWS
January 10, 1995
Prosecutors will not pursue charges against a former state health official who has agreed to pay restitution for breaking into three houses in western Howard County in 1993.John Martin Staubitz Jr. has agreed to restitution of about $2,500 for property stolen from the houses, two in Woodbine and one in West Friendship.Assistant State's Attorney Sue-Ellen Hantmann told Howard Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney yesterday that the charges were dropped because of the lengthy sentences Staubitz must serve in cases in Carroll and Baltimore counties.
NEWS
December 5, 1996
Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. yesterday sentenced a Westminster woman to six months in jail after she failed to make restitution in three bad-check cases.Burns ended probation for Victoria L. Cunningham, 27, and ruled her debt of more than $1,100 uncollectible. The woman had paid only $45 in restitution in more than four years.The woman told Burns she was waiting for her grandmother to lend her money for restitution.Man who fought officers during raid gets five yearsA Westminster man who fought with officers during a drug raid at his apartment was sentenced yesterday to five years in prison.
NEWS
March 6, 1998
A Westminster man received two suspended two-year sentences and was placed on probation for a year after pleading guilty yesterday to forging two checks in January.Michael J. Graham, 25, of the first block of Sullivan Road paid $300 in restitution yesterday and must pay an additional $89 by Monday or risk a probation violation, said Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr.Graham also must pay court costs within six months.FireWestminster: Firefighters from Reese, Pleasant Valley and Reisterstown in Baltimore County assisted Westminster at 6: 45 p.m. Wednesday, responding to a building fire in the 800 block of Baltimore Blvd.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
Federal prosecutors in Maryland hauled in almost $25 million owed to the U.S. government and victims of federal crimes in the most recent fiscal year, the U.S. Attorney's Office said. The office said it collected $11 million in criminal cases, mostly as restitution for government agencies and other victims, with some coming in fines and other assessments. Almost $14 million came in through civil fraud cases, along with penalties imposed on people and corporations for breaking federal laws.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
The former president and CEO of Wings to Go, a fast food franchise headquartered in Severna Park, was sentenced to two years in prison Wednesday for embezzling more than $885,000 from the company to pay for telephone sex and prostitutes over a six-year period, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's office. Mark Chandler Goodnow, 56, of Pasadena, must also pay restitution for the money he stole from the company to pay prostitutes in Maryland and to cover the personal expenses and phone sex fees of three Texas women, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
An Anne Arundel County judge sent a man to prison Wednesday for a series of paving scams in the county, calling Tommy Clack a "shameless swindler" who preyed on unsuspecting consumers. Clack, 40, was sentenced to two years in prison and five years probation for contracting and home improvement violations in the county, after he pleaded guilty this year in eight cases. Prosecutors said Clack targeted mostly older homeowners, often offering to repave driveways at a bargain price with leftover materials and demanding a heftier fee after the work was done.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
An unlicensed driveway paver working in the Annapolis area was ordered to pay nearly $500,000 in fines and restitution after the Maryland Attorney General's office found that he "preyed" on customers, charging them far more than he said he would. The attorney general's office said Friday that it has ordered Tommy Edward Clack, who also goes by Tommy Clark and Ed Clack, to repay at least $204,000 to customers. The office's consumer protection division also levied $284,000 in fines and ordered him to pay $5,000 in agency expenses.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
A civilian employee of the U.S. Navy who for years sold government scrap metal from Naval installations for a personal profit was sentenced in federal court Wednesday to 30 months in prison for the scheme, according to U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein. Christopher M. Hill, 47, of Lusby, who handled recycling and scraps for the Patuxent River Naval Air Station and other military installations, was also ordered by Chief U.S. District Judge Deborah K. Chasanow to pay more than $630,000 in restitution to the Navy and almost $135,000 in restitution to the IRS. According to a plea agreement in the case, a private contractor collected scrap metal owned by the government — but Hill had the firm submit payments for those scraps directly to him. Between 2004 and 2010, Hill deposited 124 checks from the company into his personal bank accounts, and did not report the earnings to the IRS. In a statement, Robert Craig, special agent in charge for the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, one of the agencies involved in the investigation, said Hill's arrest shows those agencies and Rosenstein's office "will doggedly investigate and prosecute those that decide to break the rules — or make-up their own rules — to steal and cheat from the Department of Defense.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
A sixth Baltimore Police officer was sentenced Friday for his role in a massive kickback scheme involving an auto body shop, receiving two years in prison and being ordered to pay $24,000 in restitution. Officer Rafael Concepcion Feliciano Jr., 31, admitted last year that he referred accident vehicles to the Majestic Auto Body shop in Rosedale after being introduced to the store's owners by a fellow officer, Rodney Cintron, prosecutors said. Prosecutors estimate that Feliciano alone caused a loss of between $120,000 and $200,000.
NEWS
September 17, 1990
A Baltimore man has been sentenced to three years in prison and ordered to pay restitution of $249,000 for his involvement in a scheme to defraud the state's Medicaid program.An investigation by the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit found that Sherman L. Snell received $249,003 after submitting false claims. Snell and Steven Herlich, the former owner of the Medicine Shoppe in Baltimore, received more than $450,000 from Medicaid after submitting the claims.Snell forged prescriptions and submitted invoices to the state's medical assistance program from 1986 to April 1989.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | May 9, 2004
SUE FROM Palm Beach saw her individual retirement account lose $50,000 during the bear market. Leon from Philadelphia lost $10,000. Teena in Fort Worth says simply that she "lost half," which is huge regardless of the dollars involved. What these investors have in common is that their losses occurred in Putnam funds. They read about fines Putnam paid to regulators for allowing improper trading, and they want part of the restitution monies that will eventually go to shareholders. Many inquiries Hundreds of investors have written me since I explained Putnam's settlement, or have inquired after the more recent Janus settlement, wondering how to get some money back.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Under an agreement announced Thursday by the Maryland attorney general's office, Wells Fargo has agreed to make loan modifications and pay nearly $1 million in restitution to customers of two lenders acquired by the bank. The office's Consumer Protection Division, which reached the agreement with Wells Fargo, said lenders Wachovia and Golden West Financial used deceptive marketing in offering consumers adjustable-rate home loans. Wells Fargo will pay $940,056 to borrowers with "Pick-a-Payment" mortgages written by Wachovia and Golden West who lost their homes in foreclosure, the agreement says.
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