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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Singer, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The Woman's Industrial Kitchen, the most recent incarnation of the beloved restaurant on North Charles Street, has closed its doors. A Baltimore comfort-food staple for more than 130 years before its closing in 2002, the restaurant -- formerly known as the Woman's Industrial Exchange -- served as a counterpart to the exchange's arts space. The restaurant was given new life in late 2011 when Irene Smith, owner of the Souper Freak soup truck, restored and reopened the establishment . Paula Hensley, the operations coordinator for the Woman's Industrial Exchange, said the restaurant closed about two months ago when its lease ended.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Here's a restaurant with some sharp ideas about how a French bistro should behave when it's in 21st-century Hampden - be just French enough, without being too French. Le Garage opened last month in the site where The Dogwood restaurant had its valiant run. The space, which sits below street level, has never been considered an asset, but what the operators of Le Garage have done is rather cunning. Instead of fighting their location, they've exploited the space to create an environment that feels secluded and cool, like a place for folks in the know.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
On the last weekend in May, Prost German Restaurant, at 1195 Jacob Tome Highway, held its 3rd Annual Spring Fest complete with big tent in the back, vendors, games and, naturally, lots of authentic German food. Visitors on Friday and Saturday enjoyed live German music, activities for the kids and plenty of food and fun. Much sympathy is extended to the family of Eugene Boyd of Perryville, as he passed away June 3 from congestive heart failure. Condolences are sent to his wife and five sons and all their families.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Renovations to The Charles, Baltimore's 75-year-old showcase for independent cinema, will leave the theater's original -- and largest -- screen shut down through the end of the month. Workers are putting in new, roomier seating and moving the rear wall, nearest to Charles Street, forward, which will allow the adjoining Tapas Teatro restaurant to expand, said Kathleen Cusack Lyon, who operates the theater with her father, James "Buzz" Cusack. When it reopens next month, Lyon said, the original auditorium, which opened in 1939, will have a capacity of around 400 -- about 80 seats fewer than when it closed at the beginning of June.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Cozy Restaurant, an 85-year-old Thurmont eatery that claimed to be the oldest restaurant in Maryland still operated by its founding family, has closed. News of the restaurant's closing was first reported Monday in the Frederick News-Post, which said the restaurant's last day of operation was Sunday. On Tuesday, the News-Post reported that Cozy owed about $180,000 in back taxes. The restaurant was part of Cozy Village, a Thurmont tourist camp established in 1929 by Wilbur Freeze.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Pabu is shutting down this weekend, but a new Japanese restaurant will be taking its place, according to operators. The small-plate format will be gone, replaced by a more traditional fine-dining concept. "Our number one priority is taking care of our locals," said Alex Smith, whose Atlas Restaurant Group is taking over the spaces currently operating as Pabu and Lamill in The Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore. "[Pabu] never did a great job of attracting the local crowd," he said. Smith, who owns Ouzo Bay, an upscale Greek restaurant in Harbor East, said that several Ouzo Bay customers who had seen news coverage of the Pabu closing told him they had never heard of Pabu.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Parts & Labor, the new meat-centric project from Woodberry Kitchen restaurateurs Amy and Spike Gjerde, is something new for Baltimore: a combination restaurant and butcher shop. The restaurant's culinary focus couldn't be clearer. It's meat. It's not all meat, all the time, but it comes close. The menu's centerpiece is a changing selection of five or so dry-aged butcher's cuts, which the menu describes as "under-appreciated" cuts like "plate steak" and "petite tender," which the waiter will helpfully tell you is not at all like a filet mignon.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 4, 2014
Harford County's fifth annual Restaurant Week started Monday and will run through June 14, offering all kinds of valuable dining experiences around the county at a fraction of the normal cost. During Restaurant Week participating eateries are offering prix fixe (price fixed) menus consisting of three-course meals starting at $20.14 plus beverages, tax and gratuity. Limited service restaurants may offer other special values. Numerous restaurants are participating this year, and you can view their menu selections at http://www.harfordmd.com/harford-county-event-restaurant-week . In past years, thousands of county residents have taken advantage of the special values offered during Restaurant Week, which is sponsored by the Harford County offices of Economic Development and Tourism.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
  The chef changes in Harbor East are piling up. On Wednesday, Julian Marucci officially took over executive duties at Pazo . He will remain the executive chef at Cinghiale . Both restaurants are in the Foreman Wolf restaurant group. The Bagby Restaurant Group has announced two promotions at its Harbor East restaurants. Nate Magat, formerly the chef de cuisine at Ten Ten American Bistro, is now the executive chef at Fleet Street Kitchen . And John Hufnagel is now the executive chef at Ten Ten Bistro.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
It is a comfort, albeit one of small caliber, to learn that there are actions people can take in the cause of gun rights that are so extreme they give pause to some poor soul within the headquarters of the National Rifle Association. Recent demonstrations in Texas in which proponents of open-carry gun laws have toted rifles into fast food outlets en masse got a written reprimand from the NRA - until a spokesman apologized for the criticism. Got that? NRA says don't go so far, gun demonstrators, then apologizes because, well, somebody went too far in suggesting scary tactics are ill-advised.
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