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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
A federal judge sentenced a Pennsylvania man to 10 years in prison for making videos of boys using urinals at two I-95 Cecil and Harford county rest stops last May. Brian Matthew Williams, 28, loitered at the Maryland House and Chesapeake House rest stops for five hours last May filming boys on his cell phone from an adjacent urinal, authorities said. After taking the video, he would follow them out and take full length photos of them. He made 21 videos in all. The parents of one of the victims reported Williams' suspicious actions and he was arrested by Maryland State Police.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
A federal judge sentenced a Pennsylvania man to 10 years in prison for making videos of boys using urinals at two I-95 Cecil and Harford county rest stops last May. Brian Matthew Williams, 28, loitered at the Maryland House and Chesapeake House rest stops for five hours last May filming boys on his cell phone from an adjacent urinal, authorities said. After taking the video, he would follow them out and take full length photos of them. He made 21 videos in all. The parents of one of the victims reported Williams' suspicious actions and he was arrested by Maryland State Police.
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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | September 15, 1992
Motorists stopping at the northbound rest stop on Interstate 95 in north Laurel will soon find themselves surrounded by fences topped with barbed wire.The State Highway Administration will add barbed wire to chain-link fences already surrounding the rest stop and to new chain-link fencing that will be built inside the old fences.Together, the two fences will create a moat-like effect, separating the rest stop from the heavily wooded terrain that leads to nearby neighborhoods.Police believe a man and a male teen-ager from Washington, D.C., entered nearby Bowling Brook Farms from the cover of the woods at the rest stop last week and hijacked a car with a child inside and the child's mother, who had become entangled in a seat belt, was then dragged two miles to her death.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | October 25, 2012
A Pennsylvania man pleaded guilty Thursday to violating federal child pornography laws by videotaping the genitals of unsuspecting young boys earlier this year, as they used urinals in the bathrooms at the I-95 rest stops in Harford and Cecil counties. Brian Matthew Williams, 28, of West Chester, Pa., pleaded guilty to receipt of child pornography in Baltimore Federal District County, according to a news release from the office of Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein. According to a statement of facts attached to his plea agreement, on May 6, 2012, Williams spent nearly five hours at the Maryland House rest stop near Aberdeen and the Chesapeake House rest stop near North East going in and out of the men's restrooms filming several minor males, most of whom were prepubescent, as they used the urinals.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
A New York man accused of leading a state trooper on a high-speed chase on Interstate 95 was critically injured yesterday when his van smashed into a parked tractor-trailer at a Maryland rest stop. State police said they recovered about 2 pounds of marijuana in eight bags from his van, as wekk as 180 grams of cocaine. No charges had been filed last night. The accident occurred about 2: 15 p.m. in the Chesapeake House parking lot, off Interstate 95 near North East in Cecil County, state police said.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2005
The calm enveloping the Maryland House rest stop yesterday obscured days of furious preparation for the crush of holiday travelers expected to plow through today: thousands of hamburgers, coffee cups and pizza ingredients stockpiled; the bathrooms loaded with toilet paper and hand towels; and extra workers hired. About 20,000 people are expected to pass through the rest stop on Interstate 95 in Harford County today as 1.6 million vehicles hit Maryland's major highways over the next five days.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2005
CAPE CHARLES, Va. -- Robert Wooster Jr. hauls lumber from North Carolina to Salisbury, so he's driven the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel dozens of times. He's seen the sea gulls perched on the bridge lampposts, the ships heading to sea and the way the blue-green water shimmers in the late afternoon sun. But he had never stopped, until one day last month. What took so long? "We're 68 feet long, so there's nowhere for us to stop," says Wooster, 31. His 7-year-old son Robbie helpfully adds, "That's with truck and trailer."
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff | December 20, 1990
A Virginia man, arrested at a Howard County rest stop after a man he allegedly abducted during a robbery took his gun away from him, remained in the custody today pending additional charges.Michael J. Bollback, 32, of Springfield, was charged by the Maryland State Police with kidnapping, attempted murder and using a handgun in the commission of a felony. He was being held in the Howard County Detention Center in Ellicott City.Bollback faces armed robbery and handgun charges in Prince George's County and is expected to be transferred there soon, said a spokesman for the State Police.
FEATURES
By Daniel M. Amdur and Daniel M. Amdur,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
If you've ever spent time in a car heading south, the following is probably a familiar scene:You're heading along Interstate 95 for parts warmer, and a sign up ahead flashes that familiar rest stop logo. You take a quick look at the --, and the fuel gauge reads just a tad under the quarter-tank mark.Should you stop, or try to make it to the next rest area? Decide quickly! There's only one mile to go, and it's coming up fast!For all those seasoned travelers out there tired of second-guessing their fuel tanks, John McConnell has come up with a solution.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Special to The Sun | August 2, 1994
"You've probably never lived for a week on pork rinds and Coors Light, but you can do it!" That's the dietary advice I got from a seasoned multi-day cycling veteran just before I took off for last week's Cycle Across Maryland (CAM) Tour.Billed as "Shore to Shore in '94," it began in Leonardtown on the southern end of Maryland's western shore, went to Largo, Millersville, Centreville, Salisbury, Crisfield at the southern tip of the Eastern Shore, then finished in Berlin, just a few miles from Ocean City.
EXPLORE
September 11, 2012
Back in 2005, a manager at the Starbucks Coffee shop at the Maryland House Rest Stop on I-95 just south of the Aberdeen exit told an Aegis reporter that particular Starbucks was one of the busiest in the world. It would be easy to chalk the claim up to hyperbole, exaggeration or the inexperience of a possibly not-so-worldly coffee shop manager, but anyone who has done a little research on the subject knows the claim is far from wild. Going back years before that, Marriott, the food service giant that has the restaurant contract for the Maryland House and many other rest stops across the country, also confirmed the Harford County rest stop is among the busiest.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 31, 2012
Maryland State Police are seeking to identify children who may have been photographed in rest rooms at two rest stops along Interstate 95 -- the Chesapeake House in Cecil County and the Maryland House in Harford County. Authorities on May 6 arrested a suspect, 28-year-old Brian Willams, of West Chester, Pa., and charged him photogaphing in a private place with purient intent and disorderly conduct. He is free on $35,000 bail and is awaiting trial. Police said their investigation has uncovered videos depicting 11 unidentified juveniles taken in rest rooms.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
They posed as friendly female employees eager to help older women visiting from out of state, guiding them, police said, into bathroom stalls at rest stops along Interstate 95 in Harford and Cecil counties, and possibly others in New Jersey. But authorities say the good-will ambassadors were conspirators in an elaborate theft scheme. Police said one participant diverted the women's attention while another hid in a neighboring stall and plucked wallets and credit cards from purses hanging on hooks or stuffed behind toilets.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
The State Highway Administration reopened its long-closed South Mountain rest stops along Interstate 70 near the Frederick- Washington County line this week after an $18.3 million renovation project. The agency opened a section of the eastbound and westbound rest stops after expanding the parking area and updating restroom facilities. The stops, between Exits 35 and 42 in Frederick County, have been provided with walking trails, picnic areas, parking and restrooms that comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act. According to the SHA, the reopened rest stops each have 76 parking spaces for passenger vehicles, 26 parking spaces for commercial trucks and six parking spaces for RVs and buses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
At the end of a long winter, the words "road trip" have a particular appeal, especially if you're headed somewhere that's warm and has listless alligators in fetid pens as a tourist attraction, which we'll get to in a moment. So with gas cheap and hotels practically giving away rooms, my buddy Ed and I loaded the suitcases and golf clubs in the car and hurtled down Interstate 95 for a week of R&R in the great state of Florida. One of the dangers of driving south on 95 is that you'll go insane from the mind-numbing parade of Shoney's and Stuckey's billboards that line the highway, not to mention the 4,000 signs for the ever-tacky Pedro's empire at South of the Border.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 31, 2006
Somewhere in the human brain, probably between the occipital and temporal lobes, there must be a special receptor that, even after decades of being dulled by reality, still recognizes violence at its most embryonic stage and sends a signal to the mouth to express outrage. Mine still works. The other night, some guy wearing my clothes shouted outrage at something that happened in the Thomas Alva Edison rest stop of the New Jersey Turnpike. It was impulsive. It was scary. But it was very satisfying - a shout against all violence everywhere, and I don't care if that sounds ridiculously grandiose.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Jason Song and Michael Stroh and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2002
Larry Blank eased off Interstate 70 west of Frederick and into the rest stop where he works as a custodian. It was just before midnight Wednesday. The parking lot was dead - just two other cars. He chose the space next to a blue Chevrolet Caprice. The car, he noticed, had New Jersey tags. Yesterday afternoon, as he stood outside his Hagerstown home surrounded by cameras, the 52-year-old custodian would marvel at how close he came to the two men sleeping inside, John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo, believed to be responsible for the sniper shootings that have terrorized the Washington, D.C., area.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 15, 2004
THIS IS A STORY that will either make you smile and reaffirm your faith in humanity, or make you sad that an incident like this is even considered a big deal in this day and age. It begins the other day after we drove up to see my in-laws on Long Island for my niece's high-school graduation party. We'd been there a few minutes when my wife said to me: "Go out to the car and get my purse, and we'll give Stephanie her present." Fine. I went out to the car. No purse. When I reported back that there was no purse - and therefore no present for the happy graduate - my wife gave a start, as if someone jabbed her with a cattle prod.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2005
The calm enveloping the Maryland House rest stop yesterday obscured days of furious preparation for the crush of holiday travelers expected to plow through today: thousands of hamburgers, coffee cups and pizza ingredients stockpiled; the bathrooms loaded with toilet paper and hand towels; and extra workers hired. About 20,000 people are expected to pass through the rest stop on Interstate 95 in Harford County today as 1.6 million vehicles hit Maryland's major highways over the next five days.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2005
CAPE CHARLES, Va. -- Robert Wooster Jr. hauls lumber from North Carolina to Salisbury, so he's driven the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel dozens of times. He's seen the sea gulls perched on the bridge lampposts, the ships heading to sea and the way the blue-green water shimmers in the late afternoon sun. But he had never stopped, until one day last month. What took so long? "We're 68 feet long, so there's nowhere for us to stop," says Wooster, 31. His 7-year-old son Robbie helpfully adds, "That's with truck and trailer."
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