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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
The Interstate 95 rest areas in Howard County are scheduled for temporary daytime closures beginning next week while crews repave the parking lots, the State Highway Administration said. On Monday, weather permitting, the southbound welcome center, including parking areas, will be shuttered for a week or two, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. When work is completed, the paving operation will switch to the northbound center. Both centers will be open around the clock, Friday through Sunday. Overnight truck parking will be permitted and the restrooms will reopen for the evening and overnight hours.
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
Beginning Monday morning, the Maryland Welcome Center on northbound Interstate 95 in Howard County will be closed for paving, the State Highway Administration said. The northbound rest area lots and the travel plaza will be closed 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays. The facility will be open overnight. No work will take place on Memorial Day or May 28 and the rest area will be open those days. The paving will be complete by June 30, weather permitting. Last week, crews repaved the southbound rest area as part of the $1.2 million renovation project.
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NEWS
By Jarrett Carter and Jarrett Carter,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2003
Surrounded by towering trees, rolling fields and the gurgling waters of the Gunpowder Falls, the North Central Railroad Trail attracts nearly a million visitors each year, from casual walkers to bikers, joggers and horseback riders. Because it is considered such a valuable recreational resource, the Rotary Club of Hunt Valley has joined with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources to raise money to build rest areas with benches and drinking fountains along the 20 miles of trail in Maryland, which runs from Ashland to the state line.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
A Baltimore circuit judge has dismissed a lawsuit against state officials and a Florida company that claimed the bidding process to award construction and operation of the two Interstate 95 travel plazas was illegal and biased. Judge Audrey Carrion ruled this week that Bethesda-based HMSHost "had multiple opportunities" to object to state officials about the public-private partnership process that awarded a 35-year contract to Areas USA LLC to rebuild and operate the plazas. "Plaintiff did not do so," the judge concluded.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1997
Along Virginia highways, private security guards are watching rest stops. In California, the state plans to let a business take over a rest area and open a gas station and restaurant. In North Carolina, signs warn travelers about crime.For weary vacationers, highway rest stops are peaceful oases, a place to change drivers, use the bathroom and stretch their legs. But criminals like them, too, and state police agencies are fighting back by treating rest stops more like city streets.National crime statistics do not break out crimes committed at rest stops, and there are not problems in every state.
NEWS
September 7, 1995
HIGH-SPEED traffic accidents continue to mount. Here's a recent tragedy, recounted in the Aug. 30 Cecil Whig:"What are the odds that one among thousands of cars traveling a highway will veer off onto the shoulder and strike the only car for miles parked along the roadway? A million-to-one? A thousand-to-one? Never happen?"It did happen Sunday night on I-95 between North East and Elkton. A Philadelphia man was killed and several other persons injured when his rental car was rammed by a car that drifted onto the shoulder.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Peter Jensen and Bill Glauber and Peter Jensen,Staff Writers | September 16, 1993
When Al Daniel of Baraboo, Wis., rides his 18-wheeler on the interstates, he obeys the speed limit, parks only in well-lighted rest areas, and packs a Louisville Slugger under his seat.He is cautious yet angry, especially after listening to some mean chatter on his CB the past few days as truckers and motorists react to a string of high-profile murders on or near America's interstates."You always have some concerns whenever you're out here on the road," said Mr. Daniel, a trucker with 18 years of experience.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
A Baltimore circuit judge has dismissed a lawsuit against state officials and a Florida company that claimed the bidding process to award construction and operation of the two Interstate 95 travel plazas was illegal and biased. Judge Audrey Carrion ruled this week that Bethesda-based HMSHost "had multiple opportunities" to object to state officials about the public-private partnership process that awarded a 35-year contract to Areas USA LLC to rebuild and operate the plazas. "Plaintiff did not do so," the judge concluded.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 7, 2008
Gas crisis or no, millions of Americans are hitting the road this summer, and many will travel that magical stretch of road known as the New Jersey Turnpike, where they'll stop at its various service areas which are, well, not so magical. These are named after great Americans, for some reason, and include the Vince Lombardi Service Area, the Thomas Edison Service Area, the Grover Cleveland Service Area, the Molly Pitcher Service Area and so on. You wonder what someone like Thomas Edison would think about having a rest stop named after him. This was maybe the greatest inventor in history, the man who gave us the electric lightbulb, the phonograph and 1,000 other inventions.
TRAVEL
March 4, 2001
The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is throwing a yearlong birthday party to celebrate its 75th anniversary. Beginning March 19, the 173-acre living-history museum will focus its programs on the events of 1774 -- when revolution was in the air and Colonists were itching for independence. New this year will be seasonally changing events that highlight 1774 and the impact they had on the coming revolution. This spring, for example, visitors will learn how the House of Burgesses promoted a fasting day to support Bostonians after the Boston Tea Party.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
David Lones pulled his red and silver 18-wheeler off Interstate 95 South into the Maryland Welcome Center in Savage shortly after 5 p.m., some 12 hours after his day started in New Hampshire and in time to get a parking space for the night. He's not always so lucky. "You get here after dark, you can't find a parking space," said Lones, a friendly, big-armed 52-year-old from outside Chattanooga, Tenn. Those nights, he said, he has no choice but to drive back onto the highway, hoping to find some place to park before his federally mandated drive-time expires.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 7, 2008
Gas crisis or no, millions of Americans are hitting the road this summer, and many will travel that magical stretch of road known as the New Jersey Turnpike, where they'll stop at its various service areas which are, well, not so magical. These are named after great Americans, for some reason, and include the Vince Lombardi Service Area, the Thomas Edison Service Area, the Grover Cleveland Service Area, the Molly Pitcher Service Area and so on. You wonder what someone like Thomas Edison would think about having a rest stop named after him. This was maybe the greatest inventor in history, the man who gave us the electric lightbulb, the phonograph and 1,000 other inventions.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | November 21, 2005
Roy Gilbert rolled his tractor-trailer into a bay at the Baltimore Travel Plaza and spent a few minutes hooking things up for the night. A year ago, he would have left his engine idling - spewing a gallon's worth of diesel exhaust each hour - to keep his cab warm and lighted. But a new truck stop system lets Gilbert shut off his engine for the night and still have access to warm or cool filtered air, 44 cable channels, phone and computer lines, movies and electricity. "It saves owner-operators like myself a lot of money," said Gilbert, 33, a Garrett County trucker who pays about $2.60 a gallon for diesel and $1.88 per hour to hook his truck to the self-serve system, operated from the cab by a touch-screen and magnetic charge card.
NEWS
By Jarrett Carter and Jarrett Carter,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2003
Surrounded by towering trees, rolling fields and the gurgling waters of the Gunpowder Falls, the North Central Railroad Trail attracts nearly a million visitors each year, from casual walkers to bikers, joggers and horseback riders. Because it is considered such a valuable recreational resource, the Rotary Club of Hunt Valley has joined with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources to raise money to build rest areas with benches and drinking fountains along the 20 miles of trail in Maryland, which runs from Ashland to the state line.
TRAVEL
March 4, 2001
The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is throwing a yearlong birthday party to celebrate its 75th anniversary. Beginning March 19, the 173-acre living-history museum will focus its programs on the events of 1774 -- when revolution was in the air and Colonists were itching for independence. New this year will be seasonally changing events that highlight 1774 and the impact they had on the coming revolution. This spring, for example, visitors will learn how the House of Burgesses promoted a fasting day to support Bostonians after the Boston Tea Party.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 20, 2000
Last season, Woodlawn, Mervo and Calvert Hall won boys team titles in the county, city and private schools, respectively, and Dulaney, Western and McDonogh did likewise among the girls. Their margins of victory ranged from comfortable to staggering. Everyone has had a couple of weeks of practice following a cleaning of the uniforms after the indoor season and is ready to go again. The problem for those who thrive on tight races and stiff competition, however, is that these same squads figure to dominate again.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
David Lones pulled his red and silver 18-wheeler off Interstate 95 South into the Maryland Welcome Center in Savage shortly after 5 p.m., some 12 hours after his day started in New Hampshire and in time to get a parking space for the night. He's not always so lucky. "You get here after dark, you can't find a parking space," said Lones, a friendly, big-armed 52-year-old from outside Chattanooga, Tenn. Those nights, he said, he has no choice but to drive back onto the highway, hoping to find some place to park before his federally mandated drive-time expires.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1997
Along Virginia highways, private security guards are watching rest stops. In California, the state plans to let a business take over a rest area and open a gas station and restaurant. In North Carolina, signs warn travelers about crime.For weary vacationers, highway rest stops are peaceful oases, a place to change drivers, use the bathroom and stretch their legs. But criminals like them, too, and state police agencies are fighting back by treating rest stops more like city streets.National crime statistics do not break out crimes committed at rest stops, and there are not problems in every state.
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