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By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | January 5, 1993
MedImmune Inc. said yesterday that it has asked the Food and Drug Administration for approval to market a new drug to prevent a respiratory disease in children.The Gaithersburg biotechnology company said that Respivir would be used to prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which is the leading cause of pneumonia in children.As part of an agreement with physicians who tested the product in five centers nationwide, the company said it could not release data on the results until the work was presented at a scientific conference in May.The company, which announced the application after the market closed, said it expects substantial profits from the sale of the product, assuming approval from the FDA, a process which could take several years.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Dr. Wilmot C. Ball Jr., former head of the division of respiratory diseases at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, died Oct. 12 of complications from dementia at the Edenwald retirement community. He was 85. The son of a Bell Laboratories electrical engineer and a homemaker, Wilmot Coles Ball Jr. was born and raised in Paterson, N.J., and graduated in 1945 from Ridgewood High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1949 in electrical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University, he enrolled in the Cornell University School of Medicine, from which he earned a medical degree in 1954.
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NEWS
By Julie Bell and Erika Niedowski and Julie Bell and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2003
With relatively young, healthy people in Hong Kong dying of SARS, some infectious-disease experts are concerned that the respiratory disease could kill a broader range of victims than previously believed. Hong Kong public health officials said severe acute respiratory syndrome claimed nine lives yesterday, including previously healthy women ages 32, 34 and 37 and a 45-year-old man. Over the weekend, five similar victims died. The number of younger patients killed by the virus is a relative handful of the 154 fatalities and 3,235 sickened worldwide.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Dennis O'Brien and Jonathan Bor and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2003
As federal officials weigh options to stem the spread of SARS within hospitals, two local medical centers will soon require that patients and visitors with coughs wear surgical masks. Officials at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson and St. Agnes HealthCare in Baltimore say they see masks as a way to protect health care workers and patients not only from severe acute respiratory syndrome, but also from flu and other airborne infections. "We plan this to be for now and forever more," said Dr. Eric Toner, medical director of disaster preparedness at St. Joseph, which plans to start the policy Oct. 29. There, masks will be required of anyone -- whether patient, doctor, paramedic or visitor -- entering the emergency room with a cough.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2003
Although China has reported the overwhelming majority of the world's SARS cases, the number of cases is dropping rapidly in many areas of the country, the World Health Organization said yesterday as it expressed cautious optimism that China could contain the respiratory disease, although it might take as long as a year. Dr. Henk Bekedam said he was encouraged by the trend in China, where he is WHO's representative in Beijing, and by that government's political commitment and mobilization of health workers to fight the new respiratory disease.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 2003
An American doctor advising Taiwan on fighting its SARS epidemic has come down with symptoms of the respiratory disease and will be flown home by air ambulance with three of his healthy colleagues, the governments of both countries said yesterday. It is not certain that the doctor, Chesley L. Richards Jr., an epidemiologist for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has SARS. But if he does, Richards, 42, will be the first American investigator to have contracted severe acute respiratory syndrome.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1996
Gaithersburg-based MedImmune Inc. announced yesterday that a late-stage human trial has been launched to evaluate the effect of a treatment it has developed for the prevention of a serious respiratory disease in high-risk infants.The disease, respiratory syncytial virus, is one of the leading causes of pneumonia and bronchitis in infants and small children. In the United States, more than 90,000 children are hospitalized and 4,500 die from RSV disease annually, the biotechnology company said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Dennis O'Brien and Jonathan Bor and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2003
As federal officials weigh options to stem the spread of SARS within hospitals, two local medical centers will soon require that patients and visitors with coughs wear surgical masks. Officials at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson and St. Agnes HealthCare in Baltimore say they see masks as a way to protect health care workers and patients not only from severe acute respiratory syndrome, but also from flu and other airborne infections. "We plan this to be for now and forever more," said Dr. Eric Toner, medical director of disaster preparedness at St. Joseph, which plans to start the policy Oct. 29. There, masks will be required of anyone -- whether patient, doctor, paramedic or visitor -- entering the emergency room with a cough.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 2003
GUANGZHOU, China - For three members of the Chen family, the first sign of trouble was the fainting. Within days, they spiked fevers and labored to breathe, victims of a mysterious sickness that would soon start spreading around the globe. Chen Huixiong, 39, a bus driver, was released from the hospital two weeks ago. But his elderly parents died late last month - two previously undisclosed casualties of the respiratory disease in southern China's Guangdong province. This densely populated coastal city near Hong Kong is the apparent epicenter of a worldwide outbreak that has confounded doctors, scientists and public health experts.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2000
Dr. William S. Spicer Jr., an authority in the field of tuberculosis and respiratory diseases and a former professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died Sunday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 74. Dr. Spicer, a resident of the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County, had a career at the University of Maryland School of Medicine that spanned three decades until his retirement in 1984, when he became director of the medical residency program at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 2003
An American doctor advising Taiwan on fighting its SARS epidemic has come down with symptoms of the respiratory disease and will be flown home by air ambulance with three of his healthy colleagues, the governments of both countries said yesterday. It is not certain that the doctor, Chesley L. Richards Jr., an epidemiologist for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has SARS. But if he does, Richards, 42, will be the first American investigator to have contracted severe acute respiratory syndrome.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2003
Although China has reported the overwhelming majority of the world's SARS cases, the number of cases is dropping rapidly in many areas of the country, the World Health Organization said yesterday as it expressed cautious optimism that China could contain the respiratory disease, although it might take as long as a year. Dr. Henk Bekedam said he was encouraged by the trend in China, where he is WHO's representative in Beijing, and by that government's political commitment and mobilization of health workers to fight the new respiratory disease.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2003
GAITHERSBURG - Even as the number of new cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome seems to be slowing overseas, a team of scientists here is revving up its effort to keep people from getting infected in the first place. Researchers at GenVec, a small biopharmaceutical company that normally fights enemies such as cancer and HIV, has begun the painstaking work it will take to come up with a SARS vaccine - if, that is, they can come up with one at all. Their approach is among the newest in the field of vaccine research.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Erika Niedowski and Julie Bell and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2003
With relatively young, healthy people in Hong Kong dying of SARS, some infectious-disease experts are concerned that the respiratory disease could kill a broader range of victims than previously believed. Hong Kong public health officials said severe acute respiratory syndrome claimed nine lives yesterday, including previously healthy women ages 32, 34 and 37 and a 45-year-old man. Over the weekend, five similar victims died. The number of younger patients killed by the virus is a relative handful of the 154 fatalities and 3,235 sickened worldwide.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 2003
GUANGZHOU, China - For three members of the Chen family, the first sign of trouble was the fainting. Within days, they spiked fevers and labored to breathe, victims of a mysterious sickness that would soon start spreading around the globe. Chen Huixiong, 39, a bus driver, was released from the hospital two weeks ago. But his elderly parents died late last month - two previously undisclosed casualties of the respiratory disease in southern China's Guangdong province. This densely populated coastal city near Hong Kong is the apparent epicenter of a worldwide outbreak that has confounded doctors, scientists and public health experts.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2000
Dr. William S. Spicer Jr., an authority in the field of tuberculosis and respiratory diseases and a former professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died Sunday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 74. Dr. Spicer, a resident of the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County, had a career at the University of Maryland School of Medicine that spanned three decades until his retirement in 1984, when he became director of the medical residency program at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Dr. Wilmot C. Ball Jr., former head of the division of respiratory diseases at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, died Oct. 12 of complications from dementia at the Edenwald retirement community. He was 85. The son of a Bell Laboratories electrical engineer and a homemaker, Wilmot Coles Ball Jr. was born and raised in Paterson, N.J., and graduated in 1945 from Ridgewood High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1949 in electrical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University, he enrolled in the Cornell University School of Medicine, from which he earned a medical degree in 1954.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2003
GAITHERSBURG - Even as the number of new cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome seems to be slowing overseas, a team of scientists here is revving up its effort to keep people from getting infected in the first place. Researchers at GenVec, a small biopharmaceutical company that normally fights enemies such as cancer and HIV, has begun the painstaking work it will take to come up with a SARS vaccine - if, that is, they can come up with one at all. Their approach is among the newest in the field of vaccine research.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1996
Gaithersburg-based MedImmune Inc. announced yesterday that a late-stage human trial has been launched to evaluate the effect of a treatment it has developed for the prevention of a serious respiratory disease in high-risk infants.The disease, respiratory syncytial virus, is one of the leading causes of pneumonia and bronchitis in infants and small children. In the United States, more than 90,000 children are hospitalized and 4,500 die from RSV disease annually, the biotechnology company said.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | January 5, 1993
MedImmune Inc. said yesterday that it has asked the Food and Drug Administration for approval to market a new drug to prevent a respiratory disease in children.The Gaithersburg biotechnology company said that Respivir would be used to prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which is the leading cause of pneumonia in children.As part of an agreement with physicians who tested the product in five centers nationwide, the company said it could not release data on the results until the work was presented at a scientific conference in May.The company, which announced the application after the market closed, said it expects substantial profits from the sale of the product, assuming approval from the FDA, a process which could take several years.
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