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NEWS
December 12, 1996
Joseph T. Quinlan, 71, whose legal crusade to allow his daughter Karen Ann to "die with dignity" thrust him into the national spotlight, died of cancer Saturday in Wantage, N.J.His care had been supervised by the Karen Ann Quinlan Center of Hope, the Newton, N.J., hospice he and his wife, Julia, helped start with proceeds from a book and television movie about their daughter's case.Karen Ann Quinlan was 21 when she slipped into a coma at a party on April 15, 1975. Convinced that her condition would not improve, her parents requested that her respirator be turned off. Doctors refused.
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FEATURES
June 19, 2008
Though water has always been a hazard to be wary of, the idea that someone could drown hours after visiting a swimming pool may seem new to many. On June 1, 10-year-old Johnny Jackson of Charleston, S.C., died while napping more than an hour after returning home from the pool with his mother. The incident has drawn new attention to the phenomenon of dry drowning, a danger long recognized by other names by emergency department physicians. Medical examiners have found that as many as 15 percent of drowning fatalities are dry drowning victims - those whose respiratory distress comes after an incident in the water.
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NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
Ryan Origaen's only chance for a normal life rests with a surgeon in Texas. But the parents of the 18-month-old boy from Silver Spring can't afford the air ambulance needed to fly him there.So a Baltimore organization, Roads to Recovery -- founded by a local couple in memory of their 9-year-old son who died of cancer -- has stepped in to help, donating money it won this month in a national contest for volunteerism."This child shouldn't have to die because he can't get this money," says Mike Polk, who with his wife, Della, started Roads to Recovery in 1990 to provide travel expenses for families whose children need specialized treatment.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 26, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Pope John Paul II was resting comfortably and breathing without the help of a respirator yesterday, the day after doctors at a Rome hospital performed a tracheotomy to relieve a recurring respiratory problem. Papal spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls said the pope's heart and circulatory system remain sound and there was no sign of pneumonia, a major worry for elderly patients in poor health. The tracheotomy involves opening a small passage through the neck to the windpipe and inserting a tube so air can flow directly to the lungs.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 20, 1991
MEZIBORI, Czechoslovakia -- For years, people thought Milan Stovicek was eccentric. They stared, sometimes they jeered, and once an angry coal miner attacked him.Mr. Stovicek walked the streets of this smog-choked town wearing a red respirator. He was an exotic, upright bird with a bright beak among a gray and bent population used to conforming to the will of Communist dictators.More upsetting than Mr. Stovicek's appearance was the message the respirator conveyed: The air in the region was so bad that a young biology teacher in a small town would risk public ridicule to protect his health.
SPORTS
By Dave Glassman and Dave Glassman,Special to The Evening Sun | December 20, 1990
It was going to be a routine basketball game in the Craig Cromwell League early this summer for Jermaine Porter. Instead, it was the beginning of an ordeal during which the teen-ager learned about human vulnerability as he lay helplessly paralyzed in hospital beds, fearing he might die.On that Friday afternoon, Porter, who had averaged 15 points and 7.2 rebounds as a 6-foot-5 Walbrook sophomore the previous season, felt fine before the game. But during the game, "I just felt real weak. I couldn't run up and down the court," he said.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Features Syndicate | January 25, 1994
Some former East German female runners have been banned from competition because they were reported to have taken an asthma medicine called clenbutarol. Clenbutarol belongs to a group of drugs called beta agonists that widen the bronchial tubes that carry air to and from the lungs. Beta agonists also help athletes to recover faster from workouts so they can do more work.Training for sports is done by stressing muscles with a hard workout and then allowing enough time for muscles to recover before they are stressed again.
NEWS
July 6, 1991
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- An 86-year-old brain-damaged woman -- the focus of a dispute that added a new twist to the debate over euthanasia -- has died three days after her husband won a court ruling against doctors who wanted to take her off life-support systems.Helga Wanglie, of Minneapolis, died Thursday night of natural causes, Hennepin County Medical Center said in a statement."We felt that when she was ready to go that the good Lord would call her, and I would say that's what happened," Oliver Wanglie said yesterday of his wife of 54 years.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 26, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Pope John Paul II was resting comfortably and breathing without the help of a respirator yesterday, the day after doctors at a Rome hospital performed a tracheotomy to relieve a recurring respiratory problem. Papal spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls said the pope's heart and circulatory system remain sound and there was no sign of pneumonia, a major worry for elderly patients in poor health. The tracheotomy involves opening a small passage through the neck to the windpipe and inserting a tube so air can flow directly to the lungs.
FEATURES
June 19, 2008
Though water has always been a hazard to be wary of, the idea that someone could drown hours after visiting a swimming pool may seem new to many. On June 1, 10-year-old Johnny Jackson of Charleston, S.C., died while napping more than an hour after returning home from the pool with his mother. The incident has drawn new attention to the phenomenon of dry drowning, a danger long recognized by other names by emergency department physicians. Medical examiners have found that as many as 15 percent of drowning fatalities are dry drowning victims - those whose respiratory distress comes after an incident in the water.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2003
Actor Christopher Reeve has undergone an experimental surgery that doctors believe will enable him to breathe regularly without a respirator for the first time since he broke his neck in a horseback accident in 1995. Physicians at University Hospitals of Cleveland used minimally invasive surgery to implant tiny electrodes, which control his breathing by stimulating the muscles of his diaphragm with a pacemaker-like device. Using the device, the paralyzed Superman star is able to breathe without a respirator for 15 minutes at a time.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
A third-year medical student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore has been stricken with bacterial meningitis, university staff announced yesterday. Christopher Taylor, 27, of Towson, was transported by ambulance late Thursday to Maryland General Hospital after complaining of symptoms associated with the potentially deadly disease. He was moved to University of Maryland Medical Center last night, where he was in critical condition. Dr. Richard Colgan, director of student and employee health at the university, described Taylor as "critically ill" and said his condition worsened after he was hospitalized.
NEWS
December 12, 1996
Joseph T. Quinlan, 71, whose legal crusade to allow his daughter Karen Ann to "die with dignity" thrust him into the national spotlight, died of cancer Saturday in Wantage, N.J.His care had been supervised by the Karen Ann Quinlan Center of Hope, the Newton, N.J., hospice he and his wife, Julia, helped start with proceeds from a book and television movie about their daughter's case.Karen Ann Quinlan was 21 when she slipped into a coma at a party on April 15, 1975. Convinced that her condition would not improve, her parents requested that her respirator be turned off. Doctors refused.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
Ryan Origaen's only chance for a normal life rests with a surgeon in Texas. But the parents of the 18-month-old boy from Silver Spring can't afford the air ambulance needed to fly him there.So a Baltimore organization, Roads to Recovery -- founded by a local couple in memory of their 9-year-old son who died of cancer -- has stepped in to help, donating money it won this month in a national contest for volunteerism."This child shouldn't have to die because he can't get this money," says Mike Polk, who with his wife, Della, started Roads to Recovery in 1990 to provide travel expenses for families whose children need specialized treatment.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Features Syndicate | January 25, 1994
Some former East German female runners have been banned from competition because they were reported to have taken an asthma medicine called clenbutarol. Clenbutarol belongs to a group of drugs called beta agonists that widen the bronchial tubes that carry air to and from the lungs. Beta agonists also help athletes to recover faster from workouts so they can do more work.Training for sports is done by stressing muscles with a hard workout and then allowing enough time for muscles to recover before they are stressed again.
NEWS
July 6, 1991
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- An 86-year-old brain-damaged woman -- the focus of a dispute that added a new twist to the debate over euthanasia -- has died three days after her husband won a court ruling against doctors who wanted to take her off life-support systems.Helga Wanglie, of Minneapolis, died Thursday night of natural causes, Hennepin County Medical Center said in a statement."We felt that when she was ready to go that the good Lord would call her, and I would say that's what happened," Oliver Wanglie said yesterday of his wife of 54 years.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2003
Actor Christopher Reeve has undergone an experimental surgery that doctors believe will enable him to breathe regularly without a respirator for the first time since he broke his neck in a horseback accident in 1995. Physicians at University Hospitals of Cleveland used minimally invasive surgery to implant tiny electrodes, which control his breathing by stimulating the muscles of his diaphragm with a pacemaker-like device. Using the device, the paralyzed Superman star is able to breathe without a respirator for 15 minutes at a time.
NEWS
By Evening Sun Staff | May 13, 1991
Slayings' suspect John Frederick Thanos has been taken off a life-support system and is listed in satisfactory condition at University Hospital following a May 7 suicide attempt at the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center.Joyce Tarrant, a spokeswoman for University Hospital, said Thanos is improving after being on a respirator for two days."He really has no injuries," Tarrant said, adding that neurological exams showed there is no permanent brain damage.Thanos, 41, was hospitalized after correctional officers found him unconscious in his cell.
NEWS
By Evening Sun Staff | May 13, 1991
Slayings' suspect John Frederick Thanos has been taken off a life-support system and is listed in satisfactory condition at University Hospital following a May 7 suicide attempt at the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center.Joyce Tarrant, a spokeswoman for University Hospital, said Thanos is improving after being on a respirator for two days."He really has no injuries," Tarrant said, adding that neurological exams showed there is no permanent brain damage.Thanos, 41, was hospitalized after correctional officers found him unconscious in his cell.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 20, 1991
MEZIBORI, Czechoslovakia -- For years, people thought Milan Stovicek was eccentric. They stared, sometimes they jeered, and once an angry coal miner attacked him.Mr. Stovicek walked the streets of this smog-choked town wearing a red respirator. He was an exotic, upright bird with a bright beak among a gray and bent population used to conforming to the will of Communist dictators.More upsetting than Mr. Stovicek's appearance was the message the respirator conveyed: The air in the region was so bad that a young biology teacher in a small town would risk public ridicule to protect his health.
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