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By Grace Snodgrass and Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
Cambridge is easy to miss. The city sits off U.S. 50 along the banks of the Choptank River and often goes unnoticed by motorists on their way to Ocean City. But many residents here hope that changes soon. Since the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay resort opened here last year, tourism has become the city's top draw. And developers are proposing thousands of new homes for the open space and waterfront land in the area. "I get into conversations with other people in the planning and zoning business and the buzz is all Cambridge," says Sharon Johnston, a Realtor with Long & Foster Cos. In an area that never has drawn much attention to itself, city leaders believe that buzz may be just what is needed to shake off a decades-long economic slump and bring new energy to the region.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Ocean City has sharks. That's hardly news. I mean, it has water, right? So it makes sense there would be some sharks - maybe not a great white, although there have been reports by OCEARCH of a great white named 'Mary Lee' that was tracked off the coast of Maryland earlier this year. And the town has an annual Shark Tournament, where fishermen reel them in by the pound. There's also the restaurant Shark on the Harbor, and of course, that fake shark wedged into Ripley's Museum.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 2000
MARLOTH PARK, South Africa - Residents of this exclusive resort town on the banks of the Crocodile River believe that humans and wild animals can live together peacefully without fences between them. And for the most part, it's been true, they say. Sure, the occasional baboon slips through an unlocked window, raids the fridge and makes a mess of a house. Elephants and giraffes block the road sometimes. Small prices to pay, residents say, for being able to spot exotic game on your way to the post office.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
So far this season, Ocean City has seen brawls on the boardwalk, robberies and even a few stabbings. Town councilman Brent Ashley has had enough. The vocal advocate for Maryland's resort city says what's urgently needed is a return to decency. For a start, he said, people can pull up their pants or perhaps put on a shirt and shoes in the evening. Ashley is proposing a decency law for Ocean City that could be modeled on a recent law passed in Wildwood, N.J. That law calls for a $25 fine for wearing saggy pants - those that fall 3 inches or more from the waistline - on the boardwalk.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2011
Streams of people flowed back into Ocean City after the mandatory evacuation order for Hurricane Irene was lifted Sunday, and many of them headed straight for the beach. "It's bigger, it's better," said Annamarie Rohrer, who was sitting in the sun with her daughter within two hours of the town's reopening. She marveled at how the storm's erosion had widened the beach's usable space. "I was worried that the hurricane was going to wash it all away," Rohrer said. "But now we're all not sitting on top of one another.
NEWS
October 5, 1996
OCEAN CITY'S Roland E. "Fish" Powell, stepping down after 10 years as mayor of Maryland's premier resort town, can take pride that he left the resort town in better shape than he found it.The past decade saw the start of a $30 million expansion of the city's convention center, beach replenishment and traffic-control improvements along eight-lane Coastal Highway. There have been less-noticed infrastructure enhancements, too, such as new water-pumping and garbage-transfer stations, and a new District Court and public safety building.
FEATURES
By Susanne Hopkins and Susanne Hopkins,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | January 7, 1996
It was serendipity.There I stood, chatting with Wally, the volunteer in the Scottsdale Historical Museum (also known as the Little Red Schoolhouse), when Patricia Seitters Meyers wandered in with an armload of books -- her books. On Scottsdale.Ms. Meyers, an arts and entertainment writer for the Arizona Republic, wrote what could be considered the definitive history (aptly called "Scottsdale -- Jewel in the Desert") of this long ribbon of a town that bumps up to Phoenix in the west, Mesa to the east, Tempe to the south and desert to the north.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
So far this season, Ocean City has seen brawls on the boardwalk, robberies and even a few stabbings. Town councilman Brent Ashley has had enough. The vocal advocate for Maryland's resort city says what's urgently needed is a return to decency. For a start, he said, people can pull up their pants or perhaps put on a shirt and shoes in the evening. Ashley is proposing a decency law for Ocean City that could be modeled on a recent law passed in Wildwood, N.J. That law calls for a $25 fine for wearing saggy pants - those that fall 3 inches or more from the waistline - on the boardwalk.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
Todd Ferrante, an Ocean City business owner and resident, was surveying the storm's damage Sunday morning at about 8 a.m. from the boardwalk, which had some small piles of sand caked to it. The damage he saw, he said, was cosmetic. "I have to say, Ocean City was lucky again," Ferrante said. He was looking for signs of wear at the Kite Loft, a store on the boardwalk that is in the first row of businesses along the shore, that his friend owns. The only damage he had to report back to the store's owner was one shingle missing from the roof.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011 was not a good day to be appointed Port Deposit's town administrator. The town was about to be evacuated in anticipation of the worst flooding in decades. But Rodney Hines, 64, took the challenge in stride, even though the newcomer from Illinois couldn't pronounce "Conowingo," the name of the dam about to unleash the Susquehanna's muddy waters on the town that had just named him its caretaker. Fortunately for Hines, Port Deposit has had at least two centuries of practice dealing with floods.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Ocean City's fishing pier officially opened Friday as the Maryland resort town signaled it is ready for summer visitors. During last fall's storm, about 100 feet of the pier collapsed into the surging sea. The damage was featured prominently in news coverage of the storm. But at Friday's rededication, Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan said the town had put all of that behind it. He said the re-opening the pier let's visitors know that “it's business as usual in Ocean City.” The pier was originally built in 1907 and has been rebuilt many times since then.
NEWS
December 26, 2012
Visitors to Ocean City are often struck by the contrasting fortunes of the vacant Ocean Plaza Mall on 94 t h Street and the bustle of development along U.S. 50 in West Ocean City , with its new Walmart and other big-box stores. There are a number of reasons for this, but one in particular sticks in the resort town's collective craw: double taxation. In essence, property owners in Ocean City have been subsidizing sprawl development outside town limits, a self-destructive policy that can only be described as dumb growth.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
Residents and visitors of the popular Dewey Beach resort north of Ocean City in Delaware were shocked this week when police announced they were investigating the first murder in the town since it was incorporated in 1981. Early Tuesday, Delaware State Police were searching for Pawan Kumar, 26, of Wilmington, Del., in connection with the alleged first-degree murder of Danielle Mehlman, 26, of Bensalem, Penn., in a Coastal Highway motel room police believe they were sharing.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Ocean City isn't afraid of a little horsing around. In an effort to boost tourism, the Town Council will hold a final vote next week on a proposal to allow horseback riding on the beach Nov. 1 to March 30. The proposed amendments to the town's animal ordinance allow horseback riding "beginning at the northernmost extension of 27th Street and extending south to the south end jetty. " Riding in any dune area or nesting area would be prohibited. Visitors would need to secure a permit at a cost of $50 for each horse, limited to two riders.  Additional riders could be added for $25.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011 was not a good day to be appointed Port Deposit's town administrator. The town was about to be evacuated in anticipation of the worst flooding in decades. But Rodney Hines, 64, took the challenge in stride, even though the newcomer from Illinois couldn't pronounce "Conowingo," the name of the dam about to unleash the Susquehanna's muddy waters on the town that had just named him its caretaker. Fortunately for Hines, Port Deposit has had at least two centuries of practice dealing with floods.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
We're several days into the fall season and the sun seems to have disappeared. So I think that's my cue to pack up the beach towels, shake off the sand, wean myself off the taffy and caramel corn die t, grab a few souvenirs and take this OC blog on hiatus. It's been a terribly exciting summer season in Ocean City . The resort town has been in the news for all the right - and some wrong - reasons. We've had visits from a hurricane, a tornado, the Dew Tour and the Jersey Shore!
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
If you thought Ocean City was crowded last weekend, turns out you were so right. The number of people flooding the resort town was up at least 15 percent over the same weekend last year, according to official estimates. Ocean City's population estimate for 2010 was 226,679. This year, there were an estimated 260,794 people in the popular Maryland beach destination. That explains why a colleague had to call seven hotels before finding an available room. With the air show, car show and the Maryland State Bar Association annual meeting, it's no surprise Ocean City was packed.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2011
Streams of people flowed back into Ocean City after the mandatory evacuation order for Hurricane Irene was lifted Sunday, and many of them headed straight for the beach. "It's bigger, it's better," said Annamarie Rohrer, who was sitting in the sun with her daughter within two hours of the town's reopening. She marveled at how the storm's erosion had widened the beach's usable space. "I was worried that the hurricane was going to wash it all away," Rohrer said. "But now we're all not sitting on top of one another.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
Todd Ferrante, an Ocean City business owner and resident, was surveying the storm's damage Sunday morning at about 8 a.m. from the boardwalk, which had some small piles of sand caked to it. The damage he saw, he said, was cosmetic. "I have to say, Ocean City was lucky again," Ferrante said. He was looking for signs of wear at the Kite Loft, a store on the boardwalk that is in the first row of businesses along the shore, that his friend owns. The only damage he had to report back to the store's owner was one shingle missing from the roof.
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