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Resonance Imaging

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NEWS
April 20, 1993
Dr. Melvin S. Rapelyea has been appointed chairman of the Howard County General Hospital Department of Radiology.Dr. Rapelyea will oversee all aspects of diagnostic imaging including traditional radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.A radiologist with Diagnostic Radiology Associates, Dr. Rapelyea past president of the Howard County Medical Society.The New York native is a graduate of Adelphi University and the University of Rochester School of Medicine. Doctor Rapelyea has resided in Howard County since 1981.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
William A. Edelstein, a pioneer in the field of MRI who was also a professor in the radiology department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Feb. 10 of lung cancer at his home in Original Northwood. He was 69. The son of Arthur Edelstein, an optometrist, and Hannah Edelstein, a homemaker, William AlanEdelstein was born in Gloversville, N.Y., and raised in Schenectady and Utica, N.Y., and Northbrook, Ill., where he graduated in 1961 from Glenbrook High School.
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NEWS
February 3, 1991
Drs. Copeland, Hyman & Shackman will open a full-service imaging facility in Harford County this summer.The new location in Bel Air will be headquartered at the 31,000-square-foot Plumtree Professional Center. The new facility will feature state-of-the-art imaging equipment.Drs. Copeland, Hyman and Shackman are radiologists who specializein diagnosing diseases with such innovative tools as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computer tomography (CT), ultrasound, nuclear medicine and mammography.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
After making 18 big league starts, Orioles rookie right-hander Jake Arrieta has been shut down for the season, but not solely for the expected reason. Arrieta, 24, will have a bone spur removed from his right elbow Wednesday by Orioles orthopedic surgeon Andrew Cosgarea . Arrieta said he has had the spur for years and it isn't painful, but the club decided to have it taken care of now as a precautionary measure. "I think it's going to be for the best. I talked to the doctor and the trainers, and we decided that I'm just going to go ahead and get that bone spur taken out," Arrieta said.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 16, 1993
Researchers have developed a new way of using magnetic resonance imaging that they say allows doctors for the first time to see nerves clearly in the human body.The new imaging technique, which can be accomplished by modifying existing magnetic resonance scanners in hundreds of hospitals, could improve the diagnosis of such diverse nerve conditions as chronic back pain and carpal tunnel syndrome.The researchers said the improved pictures of nerve fibers might also reduce the need for exploratory surgery to find the origin of painful conditions caused by compressed or injured nerves.
NEWS
By Staff report | July 21, 1991
The first fixed-site magnetic resonance imaging machine in the county will open in September at the Bel Air medical offices of Copeland, Hyman & Shackman P.A., on Plumtree Road.The key part for the MRI service -- a 17-ton magnetic resonance imaging magnet -- was delivered and installed Thursday.Theresa O'Donnell, supervisor of MRI testing for the physicians group, said the new center will give the doctors' Harford patients closer access to MRI technology. Currently, Harford patients must drive to the group's Rosedale or Pikesville offices.
SPORTS
March 29, 2000
Founded: 1855 Location: East Lansing, Mich. Nickname: Spartans School colors: Green and white Enrollment: 34,089 undergraduates Tuition and fees: $5,174 for in state, $12,370 out of state Famous alumni: Former pro basketball player Magic Johnson; former baseball players Kirk Gibson and Steve Garvey; former NFL player and actor Bubba Smith; actors James Caan and Robert Urich; folk singer Paul Stookey of Peter, Paul and Mary; author Peter Gent ("North...
BUSINESS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | February 18, 1991
A Bel Air developer has enlisted a New Jersey-based medical-diagnostic company as the major tenant for a planned medical park to serve Harford County's growing population.The developer, Clark Turner Companies, says the proposed Colonnade Medical Park in Bel Air will provide vital diagnostic services for physicians throughout the county and in nearby areas.NMR of America Inc. of Morristown, N.J., has agreed to lease a one-story entire building -- which represents half of the project's 16,000 square feet -- to build a modern imaging center.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | November 15, 1990
The Baltimore Orioles will be getting an electronic letter from an old friend today, but it is not known whether they will answer it.Free-agent pitcher Joe Price, who was released by the club in October, will be faxing the documentation of his latest medical examination, the results of which apparently differ from the one done under the supervision of the Orioles last month.Price visited Drs. Mark Sontag and Arthur White in San Francisco three weeks ago for an independent examination. Sontag oversees the orthopedic care of the San Francisco 49ers.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 30, 2004
CHICAGO - Because lying is more work for the brain than telling the truth, scanning the organ that holds our deepest secrets could be the ultimate way to separate fact from fiction, researchers said yesterday. Using a brain-scanning technology known as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), researchers were able to determine when subjects were not telling the truth as well as with a conventional polygraph. Ultimately, they say, the technology should prove to be even more accurate than the decades-old method, which is correct about 90 percent of the time and remains inadmissible in most court proceedings.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service. | March 30, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Lapses in using a digital medical record system for tracking wounded soldiers have led to medical mistakes and delays in care, and have kept thousands of injured troops from receiving benefits, according to former defense and military medical officials. The Defense Department's inability to get all hospitals to use the system has routinely forced thousands of wounded soldiers to endure long waits for treatment, the officials said, and exposed others to needless testing. The problem might have played a role in the suicide of a soldier last year after he was taken from Iraq to Fort Lewis in Washington state.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 30, 2004
CHICAGO - Because lying is more work for the brain than telling the truth, scanning the organ that holds our deepest secrets could be the ultimate way to separate fact from fiction, researchers said yesterday. Using a brain-scanning technology known as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), researchers were able to determine when subjects were not telling the truth as well as with a conventional polygraph. Ultimately, they say, the technology should prove to be even more accurate than the decades-old method, which is correct about 90 percent of the time and remains inadmissible in most court proceedings.
NEWS
By Robert S. Boyd and Robert S. Boyd,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 5, 2004
Love chocolate? Hate being snubbed? Turned on by sexy pictures? Turned off by an ugly face? Scientists are making rapid strides in identifying where and how your brain handles such feelings, from the overwhelming flush of romantic love to the shivers a favorite piece of music sends down your spine. Brain researchers are using technologies that measure blood flow, electromagnetic radiation and other events going on in your head when you experience strong emotions. They believe their work can help deal with problems such as obesity, drug addiction, sex crimes and mental disease.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2000
It's a nagging injury that could develop into a nagging issue. Defensive tackle Sam Adams suffered a "burner" in his neck last Thursday and missed practice yesterday for an magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] scan. The results were negative and Adams is day-to-day. But the injury, which creates a burning sensation into the shoulder when the neck is forced beyond its normal range of motion, has caused some wider concerns for the Ravens. The team is not pleased with Adams' weight, which is listed at 330 pounds, and is worried how it may affect his durability.
SPORTS
March 29, 2000
Founded: 1855 Location: East Lansing, Mich. Nickname: Spartans School colors: Green and white Enrollment: 34,089 undergraduates Tuition and fees: $5,174 for in state, $12,370 out of state Famous alumni: Former pro basketball player Magic Johnson; former baseball players Kirk Gibson and Steve Garvey; former NFL player and actor Bubba Smith; actors James Caan and Robert Urich; folk singer Paul Stookey of Peter, Paul and Mary; author Peter Gent ("North...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1997
The early-morning quiet at the University of Maryland Baltimore County gave way yesterday to the roar of a giant twin-rotor helicopter, called in to move a weighty scientific instrument closer to its new home.A 9,600-pound superconducting electromagnet -- as big as an elevator car, and part of a $2 million nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer -- was lifted from a parking lot into a courtyard beside UMBC's Chemistry/Physics Building.Federal Aviation Administration safety officials required the evacuation of six buildings and a 100-foot corridor from the parking lot to the science building.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
William A. Edelstein, a pioneer in the field of MRI who was also a professor in the radiology department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Feb. 10 of lung cancer at his home in Original Northwood. He was 69. The son of Arthur Edelstein, an optometrist, and Hannah Edelstein, a homemaker, William AlanEdelstein was born in Gloversville, N.Y., and raised in Schenectady and Utica, N.Y., and Northbrook, Ill., where he graduated in 1961 from Glenbrook High School.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions have developed a computer-assisted "magic wand" they say will greatly reduce the risks of brain surgery.The prototype device, tested and developed at Hopkins, "could revolutionize" neurosurgery, Dr. Donlin Long, the neurosurgeon in chief, said yesterday at a science writers' seminar called "Beyond Radiology: All Things Exposed."So far, the wand has been tested on three brain tumor patients "with dramatic results," Long said. "We were able to reduce the size of incisions into the skull and brain and minimize potential brain damage."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | August 9, 1993
If this were a normal time, Gary P. Jordan would have been brimming with enthusiasm.Instead, it has been a time of agony and fear -- the result of dealing with a life-threatening disease. Now there is restrained optimism.Mr. Jordan should have been relishing his appointment as interim U.S. attorney for Maryland. Instead, he's recovering from eight operations needed to vanquish a cancerous tumor in his thigh.After being away for eight weeks, he returned to the U.S. attorney's office Thursday to resume his duties part time.
NEWS
April 20, 1993
Dr. Melvin S. Rapelyea has been appointed chairman of the Howard County General Hospital Department of Radiology.Dr. Rapelyea will oversee all aspects of diagnostic imaging including traditional radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.A radiologist with Diagnostic Radiology Associates, Dr. Rapelyea past president of the Howard County Medical Society.The New York native is a graduate of Adelphi University and the University of Rochester School of Medicine. Doctor Rapelyea has resided in Howard County since 1981.
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