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By Andrea Ahles and Andrea Ahles,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 22, 1998
When Richard Wool looks at a soybean, he sees a natural resource that can be made into cars, farm machines and particleboard.For 10 years, Wool, a chemical engineering professor at the University of Delaware, has researched the use of soybean oil to make affordable manufacturing materials.Wool has developed a patented process that chemically modifies soybean oil so it can be made into a composite resin. Most commercial resins are made with petrochemicals."The soybean resin is basically a petrochemical resin look-alike, except it's from renewable resources and it's cheaper," Wool said.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
A tanker truck carrying non-hazardous resin overturned onto a median on eastbound Route 50 near Bowie Monday evening, state police confirmed. The driver was extricated and taken to an area hospital by Prince George's County emergency medical workers, Maryland State Police Sgt. Jon Hill said. The extent of the driver's injuries was unclear. All eastbound lanes and the westbound high-occupancy vehicle lane were expected to be closed for hours until another truck could pick up the cargo and the overturned tanker could be righted.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
A tanker truck carrying non-hazardous resin overturned onto a median on eastbound Route 50 near Bowie Monday evening, state police confirmed. The driver was extricated and taken to an area hospital by Prince George's County emergency medical workers, Maryland State Police Sgt. Jon Hill said. The extent of the driver's injuries was unclear. All eastbound lanes and the westbound high-occupancy vehicle lane were expected to be closed for hours until another truck could pick up the cargo and the overturned tanker could be righted.
NEWS
By Anne Tallent and Anne Tallent,Sun Reporter | February 4, 2007
The Aboriginal Man doll seems like a freeze-frame from a whirl of motion. But his didgeridoo, a musical instrument, and primitive dot pattern make him seem grounded in a place and time, as well. Another figure representing the Ndebele tribe of South Africa uses little more than a piece of patterned fabric and sculpted wire about the neck and head to indicate the dramatic traditional style of the tribeswomen. And an East Asian-style doll is striking in its silky fabric. But it also cleverly incorporates chopsticks as fashion accessories and uses stickpins in the doll's hair.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | September 3, 1995
Plastic pipes used underground to carry water from mains to curbside water meters have proved so fragile that Harford County has gone to court to recover repair costs that eventually could exceed $25 million, attorneys for the county said.The lawsuit, which was filed last week in Harford Circuit Court, is the first of its kind in Maryland and one of only a handful to address the public works side of a national concern involving polybutylene, a plastic resin produced by Shell Oil and Shell Chemical companies.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | January 7, 2001
Furnishings are made from the darndest things. Ample proof is contained in Interior Design's latest issue. The trade magazine's "Top Twenty in 2000," a reader ranking of the interior products displayed in the magazine's "Market" section, features a chair made of resin, a chaise longue upholstered in blue sneaker gel and the Jb Pendant lamp (right) in woven metal. "People are taking materials from other industries or materials you wouldn't think of to use in commercial or residential design and incorporating them in their design scheme," says Elana Frankel, Market's editor.
SPORTS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | April 4, 1993
Marty Letscher is coming into his own.In the past three weeks, he has finished just out of the top four pro bowlers who make the weekly televised finals, and twice just missed breaking into the top 24. He did it again this week at Bradley Bowl in Windsor Locks, Conn., at the $170,000 Tums Classic.Over 18 games of bowling, Letscher, 36, the owner of Marty's Pro Shop in Bel Air, knocked down 4,109 pins for a 228 average. He collected a check for $1,330, meaning he has earned about $8,000 the past three weeks.
NEWS
By Anne Tallent and Anne Tallent,Sun Reporter | February 4, 2007
The Aboriginal Man doll seems like a freeze-frame from a whirl of motion. But his didgeridoo, a musical instrument, and primitive dot pattern make him seem grounded in a place and time, as well. Another figure representing the Ndebele tribe of South Africa uses little more than a piece of patterned fabric and sculpted wire about the neck and head to indicate the dramatic traditional style of the tribeswomen. And an East Asian-style doll is striking in its silky fabric. But it also cleverly incorporates chopsticks as fashion accessories and uses stickpins in the doll's hair.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1997
RISING SUN -- They made a little bridge -- and a little history -- up here in Cecil County this week.In a dawn-to-dark workday Tuesday, about a dozen men tore out the rotting beams and worn span of an old wooden bridge over Stony Run that was 20 feet long and two lanes wide. They replaced it with a futuristic "ready to wear" span made of composite material -- a blend of glass fibers and resin that the makers say will need no maintenance for 75 years."This little bridge is truly a milestone for the whole industry," said Scott Hemphill of Hardcore DuPont Composites, the company that designed, constructed and installed the 20-foot long, two-lane bridge on Washington Schoolhouse Road.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2001
Japanese Storm King, meet American Fitness Trainer. That's his foot resting on your Yoda-like nose. Hellenistic Head of a Girl, say hello to rock climber Kalvin Evans, and forgive him for sprinkling chalk dust in your hair. Art met athleticism on the concrete facade of the Walters Art Museum yesterday as Evans, a former Air Force sergeant from Columbia, climbed the stark gray wall facing Cathedral Street with four tiny video cameras strapped to his forearms and calves. Evans chose his handholds and footholds from among 252 bright orange resin-cast replicas of art objects, bolted in erratic rows across the facade.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2001
Japanese Storm King, meet American Fitness Trainer. That's his foot resting on your Yoda-like nose. Hellenistic Head of a Girl, say hello to rock climber Kalvin Evans, and forgive him for sprinkling chalk dust in your hair. Art met athleticism on the concrete facade of the Walters Art Museum yesterday as Evans, a former Air Force sergeant from Columbia, climbed the stark gray wall facing Cathedral Street with four tiny video cameras strapped to his forearms and calves. Evans chose his handholds and footholds from among 252 bright orange resin-cast replicas of art objects, bolted in erratic rows across the facade.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | January 7, 2001
Furnishings are made from the darndest things. Ample proof is contained in Interior Design's latest issue. The trade magazine's "Top Twenty in 2000," a reader ranking of the interior products displayed in the magazine's "Market" section, features a chair made of resin, a chaise longue upholstered in blue sneaker gel and the Jb Pendant lamp (right) in woven metal. "People are taking materials from other industries or materials you wouldn't think of to use in commercial or residential design and incorporating them in their design scheme," says Elana Frankel, Market's editor.
NEWS
By Andrea Ahles and Andrea Ahles,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 22, 1998
When Richard Wool looks at a soybean, he sees a natural resource that can be made into cars, farm machines and particleboard.For 10 years, Wool, a chemical engineering professor at the University of Delaware, has researched the use of soybean oil to make affordable manufacturing materials.Wool has developed a patented process that chemically modifies soybean oil so it can be made into a composite resin. Most commercial resins are made with petrochemicals."The soybean resin is basically a petrochemical resin look-alike, except it's from renewable resources and it's cheaper," Wool said.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1997
RISING SUN -- They made a little bridge -- and a little history -- up here in Cecil County this week.In a dawn-to-dark workday Tuesday, about a dozen men tore out the rotting beams and worn span of an old wooden bridge over Stony Run that was 20 feet long and two lanes wide. They replaced it with a futuristic "ready to wear" span made of composite material -- a blend of glass fibers and resin that the makers say will need no maintenance for 75 years."This little bridge is truly a milestone for the whole industry," said Scott Hemphill of Hardcore DuPont Composites, the company that designed, constructed and installed the 20-foot long, two-lane bridge on Washington Schoolhouse Road.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | September 3, 1995
Plastic pipes used underground to carry water from mains to curbside water meters have proved so fragile that Harford County has gone to court to recover repair costs that eventually could exceed $25 million, attorneys for the county said.The lawsuit, which was filed last week in Harford Circuit Court, is the first of its kind in Maryland and one of only a handful to address the public works side of a national concern involving polybutylene, a plastic resin produced by Shell Oil and Shell Chemical companies.
SPORTS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | April 4, 1993
Marty Letscher is coming into his own.In the past three weeks, he has finished just out of the top four pro bowlers who make the weekly televised finals, and twice just missed breaking into the top 24. He did it again this week at Bradley Bowl in Windsor Locks, Conn., at the $170,000 Tums Classic.Over 18 games of bowling, Letscher, 36, the owner of Marty's Pro Shop in Bel Air, knocked down 4,109 pins for a 228 average. He collected a check for $1,330, meaning he has earned about $8,000 the past three weeks.
FEATURES
By Trish Hill and Trish Hill,N.Y. Times News Service | July 24, 1991
Theresa Jakubik, an aspiring actress in Manhattan, recently went to brunch with some people she wanted to impress. "I put on these adorable little culotte shorts," she said. But by the end of the day, she didn't look adorable. The rayon culottes were so wrinkled, she said, "I looked like I had rolled out of a 90-hour flight."It wrinkles, it's no bargain, it has to be dry-cleaned, it spots easily and trees die for its birth.This is the fabric of the 1990s?Rayon, once considered a second-class fabric to be used in lieu of silk, is showing up in every kind of clothing for both women and men. Designers talk ecstatically of its drapability, of the way it follows the line of the body.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1999
ENTERPRISE, Ala. -- Come to the center of this small, rural town of the Deep South and you will not find the usual monument to Confederate dead anchoring the square. The statue in residence is a classically attired woman holding aloft a big bug on a tray -- like Venus dealing with a major cockroach problem.It is the Boll Weevil Monument, a tribute to the bug that wrecked the local cotton crop, and with it the local economy, back in 1916. And if that strikes you as about as absurd as Chicago honoring Mrs. O'Leary's cow, or Atlanta memorializing William Tecumseh Sherman, then you've got some history to learn.
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