Advertisement
HomeCollectionsResidue
IN THE NEWS

Residue

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
An Anne Arundel County couple who rented a truck to move furniture became ill from tear gas residue, a sheriff's spokesman said yesterday. The vehicle had been used by Harford County sheriff's deputies to provide tear gas training for recruits, he said.The couple had a reaction to tear gas residue, a powder similar in appearance to concrete mix, after they used a broom to sweep the back of the truck Jan. 10, two days after the tear gas training, said Sgt. Edward Hopkins, the spokesman."They called 911 and were treated at the scene by Anne Arundel Fire Department personnel.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
After being cleared of a murder for which he spent two decades in prison, Sabein C. Burgess spent some of his first free moments in a dingy carryout next to the city courthouse holding his baby granddaughter, with his family and lawyers swarming around. "There were a lot of times I didn't think I was going to get out," Burgess said. But the evidence - gathered over years - had reached a tipping point. Shortly after Burgess' conviction, another man confessed to carrying out the killing with a notorious hit man. Then two years ago, the victim's son, who witnessed the killing as a boy, came forward to say Burgess didn't do it. And the forensic evidence has been challenged as shaky.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
A grand jury on Thursday indicted the driver state police said was high on drugs when his car sped into downtown, striking and killing a pedestrian before it overturned outside City Hall. Johnny Johnson, 43, faces nine counts, including vehicular homicide and homicide by vehicle while under the influence of a controlled dangerous substance, in the April 9 death of city finance employee Matthew Hersl. The indictment mirrors many of the charges the Maryland State Police filed on the warrant they used to arrest Johnson on April 15. Test results showed drugs were in Johnson's system at the time of the crash, while investigators found cocaine and heroin in his car, police said.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
A grand jury on Thursday indicted the driver state police said was high on drugs when his car sped into downtown, striking and killing a pedestrian before it overturned outside City Hall. Johnny Johnson, 43, faces nine counts, including vehicular homicide and homicide by vehicle while under the influence of a controlled dangerous substance, in the April 9 death of city finance employee Matthew Hersl. The indictment mirrors many of the charges the Maryland State Police filed on the warrant they used to arrest Johnson on April 15. Test results showed drugs were in Johnson's system at the time of the crash, while investigators found cocaine and heroin in his car, police said.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2001
The key witness in the trial of a Jessup man accused of a fatal hotel shooting in Columbia testified yesterday that she saw the defendant draw a black gun from his jacket pocket and cock it just before the shooting happened. Tanette McMillan, 19, said she was standing near the closed doors adjoining the two rooms where a party was being held at the Courtyard by Marriott when Shamal Ira Chapman told her, "Step out of the way." She said Chapman then pulled out the gun, and she said, "Please don't shoot," and then ran to the front desk for help.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
After being cleared of a murder for which he spent two decades in prison, Sabein C. Burgess spent some of his first free moments in a dingy carryout next to the city courthouse holding his baby granddaughter, with his family and lawyers swarming around. "There were a lot of times I didn't think I was going to get out," Burgess said. But the evidence - gathered over years - had reached a tipping point. Shortly after Burgess' conviction, another man confessed to carrying out the killing with a notorious hit man. Then two years ago, the victim's son, who witnessed the killing as a boy, came forward to say Burgess didn't do it. And the forensic evidence has been challenged as shaky.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
Six years after being indicted for manslaughter in the shooting death of an apparently unarmed teen-ager, and minutes before the start of his second trial, Baltimore police officer Edward T. Gorwell II was unexpectedly cleared yesterday when new evidence emerged in the case.Surprised city prosecutors decided to drop the charges, but left open the possibility that Gorwell might be charged again.Gorwell has always contended that he heard a gunshot and fired in self-defense when he killed 14-year-old Simmont Donta Thomas on April 17, 1993.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1999
They are men now. But on a misty spring night six years ago, they were just boys and bored when they broke into a Chrysler New Yorker in West Baltimore and took it for a joy ride.Andre. Terrill. Quentin. Duane. With them, sandwiched in the middle of the back seat, a 14-year-old named Simmont "Sam" Thomas nervously tagged along.What happened that night grew into one of Baltimore's more racially divisive cases of alleged excessive police force. Stopped by Baltimore Police Officer Edward T. Gorwell II, who is white, the five black teens jumped from the car and scattered into Gwynns Falls Park.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzieand Randy Johnson | March 30, 1991
Catching up on the mail:A reader from Baltimore asks how to preserve the "pressed cardboard wall covering" in her basement. "The one problem is that one or two sections of it are in bad shape, while the rest is fine," she writes. "The other problem is that it is scratched and scraped. I've been told I can't paper over it. Can I paint it? We are ready to deal with that room."The simple answer is yes, you can paint it, but heavy paint, or many coats of paint, will obscure the design. What kind of paint you use depends on the current finish.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | October 13, 1991
He's not exactly the storybook character Bert, ready to lead Mary Poppins' charges up a smoke stairway to the stars.But Brian Miller,a partner in Miller's Chimney Sweep of Westminster, will clean your flue just as thoroughly.A full-time sweep for the past five years, Miller said the familybusiness was started when his brother was out of work 13 years ago."Wayne worked at the Caterpillar plant in Dallastown, Pa., and when they went on strike, he had no job," Miller said. "So, he started the family business."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
Ten days after an East Baltimore fire that caused seven deaths, the state medical examiner has at last identified all of the victims -- a process complicated by scant medical records, the severity of the burns and the ever-shifting population of the crowded rowhouse on Cecil Avenue. Only two of the dead have been buried so far. But relatives are hoping that tomorrow they can have a single funeral for the remaining victims, even as they express frustration over the prolonged grieving process that they say has made their anguish worse.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,Chicago Tribune | September 22, 2006
Janet Felde feels a connection to Cardinal Francis George, who's recovering from surgery for bladder cancer. Like Chicago's Roman Catholic archbishop, she's a polio survivor. George, 69, contracted polio at age 13; to this day, he wears a leg brace to support muscles ravaged by the viral illness. Felde, 58, caught the disease as an 11-month-old infant and has lived with its aftereffects since. "As a fellow survivor, I'd like the cardinal to know: `You're an amazing example to us all. And please, please, take care of yourself,'" said Felde of Downers Grove, Ill. Medical experts say it's advice worth heeding.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
The FBI is no longer analyzing gunshot residue in its investigations, a blow to once highly regarded evidence used to suggest that a suspected criminal had fired a weapon. Lawyers, scientists and law enforcement officials across the country said they were astonished by the decision and said it could mean the end of using such evidence. It also could become a weapon for defense attorneys in pending cases and in efforts to overturn convictions. "If the premier forensic science organization in the world isn't using gunshot residue, that certainly raises some questions about it," said Timothy S. Brooke of the American Society for Testing and Materials, which sets the policies used by many police crime labs, including Baltimore's.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | February 22, 2006
BERLIN -- My apartment, situated in a leafy neighborhood on the outskirts of town, overlooks Wannsee, an idyllic lake that has been frozen for much of the winter. From my balcony, on a typical day, you can see the ice dotted with people strolling, bicycling, walking dogs or cruising in ice sailing vessels. You can also see a villa on the opposite shore known locally as the Wannsee House. On a January day in 1942, a group of Nazi officials met there to make plans for what they called "The Final Solution to the Jewish Question."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2005
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge denied a motion yesterday for a new trial in the case of a city man who was convicted six years ago in a case that hinged on gunshot residue evidence that his attorneys say is unreliable. Judge John N. Prevas ruled that there was "no need to roll the clock back" in the case of Tyrone Jones, who had asked the judge for a second time to set aside his conviction for conspiracy to commit murder in a June 24, 1998, shooting in East Baltimore. The Jones case is among hundreds that a team of public defenders has been examining in an effort to find wrongful convictions from what they believe to be faulty gunshot residue evidence.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2005
Six years ago, the Baltimore Circuit Court judge who sentenced a college student to life in prison in a murder case that hinged on gunshot residue said he would set the man free if evidence was found showing he did not commit the crime. Tyrone Jones was back in court yesterday. Jones and a team of public defenders are arguing in a motion for a new trial that two particles of gunshot residue found on his left hand June 24, 1998, the evening of a fatal shooting in East Baltimore, could have come from the way the Baltimore Police Department collected the tiny scraps of evidence.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | February 22, 2006
BERLIN -- My apartment, situated in a leafy neighborhood on the outskirts of town, overlooks Wannsee, an idyllic lake that has been frozen for much of the winter. From my balcony, on a typical day, you can see the ice dotted with people strolling, bicycling, walking dogs or cruising in ice sailing vessels. You can also see a villa on the opposite shore known locally as the Wannsee House. On a January day in 1942, a group of Nazi officials met there to make plans for what they called "The Final Solution to the Jewish Question."
NEWS
By Maude McDaniel and Maude McDaniel,Special to The Sun | May 7, 1995
"Chasing Dirt: The American Pursuit of Cleanliness," by Suellen Hoy. Illustrated. 258 pages. New York: Oxford University Press. $25 The "eerie Lifebuoy 'B.O.' foghorn" haunted my youth. It's good to report that meeting it again in the pages of this exhaustively researched social history of America's evolution from incredible filth to obsessive cleanliness somehow laid the old ghost to rest.The 1940s radio commercial was, in fact, a late development in a long crusade against dirt that began in the mid-19th century, inspired by conditions that would appall even those of us who suspect we were born several generations too late.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
The Baltimore state's attorney's office said last week that it has found about half a dozen convictions in cases that may have involved the controversial identification of gunshot residue evidence. The preliminary review of shooting and weapons cases from the past five years came after a Circuit Court judge decided last month to exclude a two-element particle of gunshot residue evidence from a trial. He said a particle containing three elements -- lead, barium and antimony -- is required to meet the scientific community's threshold for establishing that a substance is gunshot residue.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2005
Public defenders who say a Baltimore police analyst possibly misidentified gunshot residue 92 times in the past four years have begun a review to see how many city shooting and weapons cases may be affected. The findings, announced yesterday, come on the heels of a Circuit Court judge's ruling in one case that the Baltimore Police Department's only gunshot residue analyst, Joseph Harant, incorrectly labeled a two-element particle. Judge John C. Themelis said he believes the scientific consensus is that only three-element particles can conclusively be called gunshot residue.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.