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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Linda Ogwuazor, a Howard University student from Elkridge, packed her bags and boarded a flight to summer school this month. Her destination: Thailand, where she and other students from around the world are taking part in an international science mission. Ogwuazor, 19, is one of the students in science, technology, engineering and math disciplines in Howard's Global Education, Awareness and Research Undergraduate Program - or GEAR-UP. Funded with a $5 million National Science Foundation grant, the program began four years ago and gives students at the historically black college in Washington opportunities to conduct original research abroad.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Baltimore County Police Chief Jim Johnson says officers in his department should not have asked to meet with two Dundalk activists after they testified at a County Council work session in Towson this month. The Dundalk residents — a community association president and a former state lawmaker — have said it felt like police intimidation when officers met them at a local library to go over rules for public meetings after they had testified against county plans to redevelop the North Point Government Center.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
A senior living community with 148 apartments has opened on Bel Air Road in Perry Hall. Brightview Perry Hall will offer assisted living, independent living and Alzheimer's care options, Brightview Senior Living officials said Monday. Service for residents include maintenance, housekeeping and transportation.The community also features a putting green, walking paths and a tree-preservation area. County Councilman David Marks, who represents Perry Hall and who sponsored a resolution that led to approval of the project in 2011, said, “This is an important day - for residents, families, associates, the Perry Hall community - as we celebrate the opening of Brightview Perry Hall.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Percy Smith is against Baltimore's new curfew. Like many of its critics, he's fine with keeping kids off the street late at night; he's just concerned about how it will be implemented. "I'm asking from an economic perspective," he said, "will this be Fells Point or East Baltimore?" He added later that he doesn't want a curfew "just protecting the Inner Harbor. " The Govans man and more than 100 other city residents came to Morgan State University on Monday night to learn about and voice their support of or opposition to the policy, which goes into effect Aug. 8. Residents asked pointed questions to a panel of city officials that included Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts and Councilman Brandon Scott, who sponsored the law. Some worried about how police will engage youths; others asked how parents will be held accountable for allowing their children to roam the city unsupervised.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
As Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake set out on foot Saturday to pitch an upcoming community forum on the city's new youth curfew law, the controversial measure drew — as it has in the past — a mixed response from residents. Charlie Heyman, an Ednor Gardens-Lakeside resident and father of seven, said children need more "structure" and responsibility in their lives. "I would love to have this enforced," Heyman, 49, said after shaking hands with the mayor. "I was raised on a curfew, and I see the benefits of a curfew.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Terence T. Finn, a retired NASA executive who boosted the Space Shuttle program and whose passion for military history fueled four books on the subject, died June 27 of a blood platelet disorder. The Eastern Shore resident was 71. Dr. Finn, a New York native, spent his working life in the Washington area as a federal employee, first as a legislative assistant to Sen. Joseph D. Tydings, a Maryland Democrat. Dr. Finn worked on Capitol Hill from 1966 to 1977, in staff positions that included senior counsel for energy, science and space at the Senate Budget Committee.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Artist Neil Feather, who builds mechanized musical instruments from bowling balls, film projectors and cigar boxes, among other objects, received this year's $25,000 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday evening. Trained as a ceramicist, Feather said he draws inspiration from antique machinery and "strange technology that didn't make it to the mainstream. " "I like listening to all the matter around me vibrating," Feather, 58, said in a phone interview after the award ceremony at the Walters Art Museum . The Waverly resident is a founding member of the Red Room Collective and the High Zero Foundation, groups that have pushed Baltimore to a vanguard of the international experimental music movement.
FEATURES
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Will it be Scout? Sioux? Vega? The first bald eagle to land at Baltimore's zoo in a decade is finishing a mandatory quarantine and preparing to meet visitors for the first time later this month. But first, the female bald eagle needs a name. Zoo keepers at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore have come up with five possibilities and want the public's help picking one through an online poll. The eagle, which came from the National Aviary in Pittsburgh, currently has just a species name - Haliaeetus leucocephalus, which in Latin means "sea eagle with white head.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Baltimore's low-income residents and seniors will receive more money off their water bills, under increases to assistance programs Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Wednesday. The mayor said low-income residents who qualify will receive $161 off their annual bills. Seniors who have a household income of less than $25,000 annually will have their quarterly bills discounted by 39 percent, up from a 35 percent break. Rawlings-Blake said she wants to help vulnerable residents cope with increases to the city's water and sewer rate — which are set to go up 42 percent over a three-year period to help Baltimore pay to fix its aging infrastructure.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Some of the residents of the Rodgers Forge neighborhood that borders Towson University's softball stadium are alumni of the school and fans of the Tigers. They understand the university's desire to build a $2 million new facility this summer and bring the program up to NCAA Title IX standards. They just don't want it 25 feet from their backyards. The roughly two-dozen neighbors, who last month formed an ad-hoc committee to protest a new complex, rallied outside the university Saturday morning, saying the school has refused to negotiate with them on the plans.
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