Advertisement
HomeCollectionsResidential Treatment Center
IN THE NEWS

Residential Treatment Center

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
When state officials sent out a recent news release to detail their success providing 20,600 more Marylanders with drug and alcohol treatment, the description appeared vastly different than what some providers on the ground were saying.  The Baltimore Sun was already investigating a tip that three treatment centers in Baltimore County were closing their doors this summer and others were at risk. To find out how both scenarios could be true...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
When state officials sent out a recent news release to detail their success providing 20,600 more Marylanders with drug and alcohol treatment, the description appeared vastly different than what some providers on the ground were saying.  The Baltimore Sun was already investigating a tip that three treatment centers in Baltimore County were closing their doors this summer and others were at risk. To find out how both scenarios could be true...
Advertisement
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | March 14, 2006
Maryland's juvenile jails are housing kids who aren't supposed to be there - dozens of young offenders with severe mental or emotional problems waiting for state officials to find them a bed in a residential treatment program. Department of Juvenile Services records show that as of late January, 63 youths had been jailed six weeks or longer while waiting for a placement - nearly twice the number of a year ago. The jails, formally known as detention centers, are supposed to be used only for short-term stays until a youngster accused of a crime can have his case decided in juvenile court.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
The pizazz of 157 decorated trees sends a joyous message as the doors swing open in a spectacular Christmas display at a children's residential treatment center in Timonium. "It was so much fun for the kids," said floral designer Jake Boone, who continues a holiday tradition established at St. Vincent's Villa by Patricia Breslin Modell, the philanthropist and wife of Ravens owner Art Modell . After her death in October, a group of volunteers continued what she and Boone conceived as a holiday surprise party for the 105 children, aged 14 and under, who live at the Villa, where they receive continuing treatment for emotional and behavioral disabilities.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
The pizazz of 157 decorated trees sends a joyous message as the doors swing open in a spectacular Christmas display at a children's residential treatment center in Timonium. "It was so much fun for the kids," said floral designer Jake Boone, who continues a holiday tradition established at St. Vincent's Villa by Patricia Breslin Modell, the philanthropist and wife of Ravens owner Art Modell . After her death in October, a group of volunteers continued what she and Boone conceived as a holiday surprise party for the 105 children, aged 14 and under, who live at the Villa, where they receive continuing treatment for emotional and behavioral disabilities.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2001
Brooklyn Park residents will have to wait at least another month to learn whether a residential drug-treatment center in their neighborhood will expand, despite their mounting opposition. The board of directors of Damascus House, a 17-bed halfway house in the 4200 block of Ritchie Highway, spoke with neighbors at a meeting Thursday and decided to reconvene March 1 for a special session on the expansion. Board members - some of whom said they were unsure of their stance given the community opposition - will decide whether they want to move forward with the plans to purchase and renovate a house behind the facility on Edison Street and add 15 beds.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
A new public residential drug treatment center opened yesterday in Northwest Baltimore - the first new facility in 30 years - and city officials hope it will create more bed space for addicts wishing to become clean. The facility at 4615 Park Heights Ave. will hold 135 people. It will be run by Gaudenzia Inc., a 34-year-old company that has more than 40 treatment sites throughout Pennsylvania. The facility will offer outpatient and residential programs for substance-abuse treatment, as well as prevention and education.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2003
Kevin Sheehan had a wife, a home and an insurance business. Jerome West was a sales representative for a Baltimore appliance parts company. That was before drugs and alcohol landed them on the streets. Now they reside at Helping Up Mission, a faith-based residential treatment center for homeless men in East Baltimore. Founded in 1885 to minister to the poor, the shelter was praised by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. last week during his State of the State address, as he emphasized his commitment to drug treatment and faith-based programs.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1998
Skilled volunteers sought to fix up homes for the elderlyComprehensive Housing Assistance Inc. is seeking professional contractors and craftsmen to provide minor repairs and maintenance for its ninth annual Senior Home Repair Day next Sunday.Last year, CHAI volunteers helped 40 low-income elderly homeowners with work ranging from grab bar installation to roof repairs.Companies providing assistance in 1997 included Caplan Glass, Environmental Maintenance, SD Kitchens, Frank J. Klein & Sons, C&S Ornamental, Business Flooring, Finglass Construction, Mount Royal Management and Harold Rosinsky Plumbing & Electric.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1995
New positions* E. I. Kane Cos. announced the selection of Jeffrey C. Lang as executive vice president of the intermodal division. Donna Baldwin and Joseph Evans joined the Baltimore transport company as safety director and fleet manager, respectively.* Holiday Inn at Timonium Plaza has chosen Jane Weeks as director of sales.* Southern Maryland Oil, La Plata-based supplier of home heating oil and services, named Roger L. Engelau general manager.* Preston Trucking has added Karen Meacci to its staff as director of marketing.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | March 14, 2006
Maryland's juvenile jails are housing kids who aren't supposed to be there - dozens of young offenders with severe mental or emotional problems waiting for state officials to find them a bed in a residential treatment program. Department of Juvenile Services records show that as of late January, 63 youths had been jailed six weeks or longer while waiting for a placement - nearly twice the number of a year ago. The jails, formally known as detention centers, are supposed to be used only for short-term stays until a youngster accused of a crime can have his case decided in juvenile court.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2003
Kevin Sheehan had a wife, a home and an insurance business. Jerome West was a sales representative for a Baltimore appliance parts company. That was before drugs and alcohol landed them on the streets. Now they reside at Helping Up Mission, a faith-based residential treatment center for homeless men in East Baltimore. Founded in 1885 to minister to the poor, the shelter was praised by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. last week during his State of the State address, as he emphasized his commitment to drug treatment and faith-based programs.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
A new public residential drug treatment center opened yesterday in Northwest Baltimore - the first new facility in 30 years - and city officials hope it will create more bed space for addicts wishing to become clean. The facility at 4615 Park Heights Ave. will hold 135 people. It will be run by Gaudenzia Inc., a 34-year-old company that has more than 40 treatment sites throughout Pennsylvania. The facility will offer outpatient and residential programs for substance-abuse treatment, as well as prevention and education.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2001
Brooklyn Park residents will have to wait at least another month to learn whether a residential drug-treatment center in their neighborhood will expand, despite their mounting opposition. The board of directors of Damascus House, a 17-bed halfway house in the 4200 block of Ritchie Highway, spoke with neighbors at a meeting Thursday and decided to reconvene March 1 for a special session on the expansion. Board members - some of whom said they were unsure of their stance given the community opposition - will decide whether they want to move forward with the plans to purchase and renovate a house behind the facility on Edison Street and add 15 beds.
SPORTS
May 4, 1993
Jerry Phipps, who has 29 years of experience in coaching and athletic administration, has been appointed interim athletic director at the Victor Cullen Academy in the Frederick County community of Sabillasville.The school, one of several operating nationwide under the banner of Youth Services International Inc., is a residential treatment center for adjudicated young men, most of them ages 14 to 18. Its mission is to change their attitudes and values, helping them become law-abiding citizens.
HEALTH
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
Adventist Behavioral Health said it will close its residential treatment facilities and school in Crownsville later this year, moving the teen-agers it serves to locations in Rockville and in Cambridge on the Eastern Shore. The nonprofit, part of Rockville-based Adventist HealthCare, said demand is waning for residential psychiatric and behavioral treatment in favor of outpatient care. It intends to increase such community-based offerings as it consolidates residential options. Kevin Young, president of Adventist Behavioral Health, said the 30-bed residential treatment center and 18-bed group home would be phased out over the next several months as patients are moved one by one, rather than en masse.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.