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Residential Trash

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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
Sykesville may cut back on its residential trash collection or quit the business altogether.The only Carroll County town that hauls its own trash is facing increased costs for a labor-intensive process, and town officials are reviewing their options."
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 20, 2012
Recycling is the right thing to do. By now, only the resentful, the slothful and people who want to abolish the Federal Reserve must feel otherwise. We're all supposed to remove junk mail, jugs, cans and bottles from the trash so that the paper, plastics, aluminum and glass from them might be used again. Americans lead the world in per-capita trash, so the more trash we recycle, the less we have to bury in landfills. That's the basic understanding. All but the cranky, the indolent and the tree-hugger-haters are well past acceptance of this idea.
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NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
After a lot of debate and a closer look at Westminster's proposed $28.6 million budget for the next fiscal year, city officials have decided against imposing an annual fee for residential trash collection. Instead, the city's spending plan - expected to be introduced at tomorrow's Common Council meeting - has been recalculated to make up about $300,000 in additional revenue that the "trash tax" would have generated. The city's finance department has made more cuts, dipped into the city's reserves for equipment and vehicles, and found previously uncollected sources of money.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Howard County's trash disposal honeymoon is nearing an end — which likely means higher fees for residents — but public employee pensions are sound, county officials told a citizens committee studying levels of spending and borrowing for the next fiscal year. County budget director Raymond S. Wacks wanted the group, which met at the George Howard Building on Wednesday morning, to review opportunities, like the influx of federal defense-related jobs in and around Fort Meade, and potential challenges, like the cost of trash disposal and employee pensions.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1997
As Howard County moves to divert its residential trash from Alpha Ridge in Marriottsville to an out-of-state landfill, a waste-management company told the County Council last night that a new transfer facility is needed to dispose of commercial trash and promote more recycling.Browning-Ferris Inc. asked the council members, sitting as the Zoning Board, to approve a 17-acre solid-waste transfer station off U.S. 1 near Cemetery Lane in Elkridge. A transfer station consolidates and prepares trash for transport to a landfill.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
Attorneys for a coalition of Elkridge residents and businesses attacked a waste-management company's claim last night that its services are needed.Browning-Ferris Inc. has asked the Howard County Council, sitting as the Zoning Board, to approve a 17-acre solid-waste transfer station off U.S. 1 near Cemetery Lane in Elkridge. A transfer station consolidates and prepares trash for transport to a landfill.The company has said the new transfer facility is needed to dispose of commercial trash and promote more recycling among residents.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
The Anne Arundel County Council approved last night County Executive John G. Gary's plan to increase the fees for sewer and water service and residential trash pickup.But the seven-member council unanimously rejected a personnel bill that included pay raises for several of Mr. Gary's aides and would have created new positions in the executive's office.Council President Diane R. Evans, an Arnold Republican, was the most critical of the personnel proposal. She said Mr. Gary's request for pay raises and new positions was poorly timed, since a $130,000 study of the county's work force and pay grades is still under way.Mrs.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller | November 14, 1990
CAMPAIGN SIGNS BLOOM, THEN DIE FASTLike the much-anticipated floral event in "The Cactus Flower," campaign signs bloom only once every few years, briefly decorating roadsides and lawns. And then they're gone.Fall fashion colors in campaign signery included Beltram blue, Drown yellow, Rappaport pink, Bobo red, white and blue, Ecker aqua and French red.The ultimate destination for many of the signs seems likely to be the county landfill, although landfill workers can't confirm that their province is the last stop for old campaign signs.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | December 20, 2009
The problem:: Trash cans in Southwest Baltimore have become a dumping site. The back story:: A well-intentioned idea to keep city gateways clean quickly turned into a nuisance on South Gilmor Street at Wilkens Avenue. "What was designed to be a good thing didn't turn out to be," said Anne Ames, who wrote to Watchdog to get two metal trash cans removed from her New Southwest/Mount Clare community. The metal cans with plastic liners were installed along with two park benches in the Wilkens Avenue median.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1997
In a development case that is not even half over after three hearings before the Howard County Zoning Board, a waste-management company restated last night its case for why its proposed solid-waste transfer station is needed.Browning-Ferris Inc. has asked the County Council, sitting as the Zoning Board, to approve a 17-acre station off U.S. 1 on Cemetery Lane in Elkridge.A transfer station consolidates and prepares trash for transport to a landfill.BFI attorney Ronald S. Schimel used the concluding testimony of Jim Stone, the company's vice president of marketing and sales, to restate the company's case that the transfer station is needed to dispose of commercial trash, to promote more recycling and create competition among waste-management companies.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | December 20, 2009
The problem:: Trash cans in Southwest Baltimore have become a dumping site. The back story:: A well-intentioned idea to keep city gateways clean quickly turned into a nuisance on South Gilmor Street at Wilkens Avenue. "What was designed to be a good thing didn't turn out to be," said Anne Ames, who wrote to Watchdog to get two metal trash cans removed from her New Southwest/Mount Clare community. The metal cans with plastic liners were installed along with two park benches in the Wilkens Avenue median.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
After a lot of debate and a closer look at Westminster's proposed $28.6 million budget for the next fiscal year, city officials have decided against imposing an annual fee for residential trash collection. Instead, the city's spending plan - expected to be introduced at tomorrow's Common Council meeting - has been recalculated to make up about $300,000 in additional revenue that the "trash tax" would have generated. The city's finance department has made more cuts, dipped into the city's reserves for equipment and vehicles, and found previously uncollected sources of money.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2000
County Executive Janet S. Owens is "strongly inclined" to maintain the county's twice-a-week trash pickup, despite the Department of Public Works' belief that one pickup each week would have financial and environmental benefits, she said Friday. "I know our solid-waste team really favors once-a-week pickup," Owens said. "While I appreciate the study and thought that they've put into this, it's contrary to what our citizens are telling us. The majority of our citizens want traditional twice-a-week trash collections."
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
The Howard County Zoning Board will not make a decision on a proposed trash transfer station in Elkridge until June at the earliest.It had been expected that yesterday's all-day hearing -- the 11th session on the issue, dating to January -- would be the last.But, after attorneys for Browning-Ferris Industries and witnesses for the opponents -- a coalition of Elkridge residents and merchants -- continued wrangling over whether the transfer station would be suitable for the community, the board scheduled three more hearings, May 28, June 2 and June 4.BFI proposes building the transfer station on a 17-acre site on Cemetery Lane where the waste-management company operates a recycling center.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1997
In a development case that is not even half over after three hearings before the Howard County Zoning Board, a waste-management company restated last night its case for why its proposed solid-waste transfer station is needed.Browning-Ferris Inc. has asked the County Council, sitting as the Zoning Board, to approve a 17-acre station off U.S. 1 on Cemetery Lane in Elkridge.A transfer station consolidates and prepares trash for transport to a landfill.BFI attorney Ronald S. Schimel used the concluding testimony of Jim Stone, the company's vice president of marketing and sales, to restate the company's case that the transfer station is needed to dispose of commercial trash, to promote more recycling and create competition among waste-management companies.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1997
A proposal by a waste-management company to build a new waste-transfer facility off U.S. 1 has so inflamed the Elkridge community that the ethics of the leaders of a historic church are being called into question.At issue is the rumor that the 140-year-old Trinity Episcopal Church on U.S. 1 received funds from Browning-Ferris Inc. for a recent rectory renovation.BFI and church officials say that this is not true and that the story is being promoted by residents who are against the proposal.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
The Howard County Zoning Board will not make a decision on a proposed trash transfer station in Elkridge until June at the earliest.It had been expected that yesterday's all-day hearing -- the 11th session on the issue, dating to January -- would be the last.But, after attorneys for Browning-Ferris Industries and witnesses for the opponents -- a coalition of Elkridge residents and merchants -- continued wrangling over whether the transfer station would be suitable for the community, the board scheduled three more hearings, May 28, June 2 and June 4.BFI proposes building the transfer station on a 17-acre site on Cemetery Lane where the waste-management company operates a recycling center.
NEWS
June 10, 1993
Carroll County's belated reconsideration of require countywide recycling represents the realization that the towns alone can't carry the burden with their own recycling programs.The commissioners' decision to draft legislation that would require county residents to recycle their trash is to be commended. Now, citizens must push the governing body to adopt such legislation, which would simply require separation of waste from recyclables for curbside collection.The county commissioners decided against mandatory recycling last year.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
Attorneys for a coalition of Elkridge residents and businesses attacked a waste-management company's claim last night that its services are needed.Browning-Ferris Inc. has asked the Howard County Council, sitting as the Zoning Board, to approve a 17-acre solid-waste transfer station off U.S. 1 near Cemetery Lane in Elkridge. A transfer station consolidates and prepares trash for transport to a landfill.The company has said the new transfer facility is needed to dispose of commercial trash and promote more recycling among residents.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1997
As Howard County moves to divert its residential trash from Alpha Ridge in Marriottsville to an out-of-state landfill, a waste-management company told the County Council last night that a new transfer facility is needed to dispose of commercial trash and promote more recycling.Browning-Ferris Inc. asked the council members, sitting as the Zoning Board, to approve a 17-acre solid-waste transfer station off U.S. 1 near Cemetery Lane in Elkridge. A transfer station consolidates and prepares trash for transport to a landfill.
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