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NEWS
April 13, 1991
With the blooming forsythia of spring come the first fragile signs of life in the moribund residential real estate market. Nationwide, sales of new homes surged 16.2 percent in February, the biggest gain in nearly five years. Existing home sales for the month registered a 7.9 percent increase -- another five-year record.The March numbers aren't yet out, but surveys by the Mortgage Bankers Association and the National Association of Home Builders suggest sales of entry-level homes, those typically purchased by first-time buyers, continued upward in March.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Mary Monica Skelton-Kerner, who sold residential real estate and was a hospital volunteer, died of heart disease Sunday at Sinai Hospital. She was 79 and lived in Bel Air. Born Mary Monica Skelton in Williamsport, Pa., she was the daughter of William Skelton, a Glenn L. Martin flight manual writer and engineer, and Mary Monica Skelton, a nurse. She lived in Overlea as a young woman and was a 1952 graduate of Kenwood High School, where she sang in the girl's chorus and the glee club and belonged to the Civil Air Patrol.
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BUSINESS
By James M. Woodard and James M. Woodard,Copley News Service | December 8, 1991
Most real estate brokerage firm owners believe today's market is reasonably strong, a new survey shows. At least, they are not suffering from deep recession blues.And they have a growing confidence in the health of residential real estate markets nationwide, according to a survey of 489 broker firm owners by Great Western Bank. The survey included brokers in 18 states across the country.Realtors rated today's residential real estate market on a scale from one to 10, the best being 10. The most confident and optimistic Realtors were in the Midwest, where they reported an average rating of 6.4 for today's real estate market.
NEWS
By Jeffrey S. Detwiler and President and Chief Operating Officer The Long & FosterĀ® Companies | August 27, 2012
ADVERTORIAL CONTENT In the past few years, real estate has increasingly become an investment option that's difficult to ignore. With moderated pricing and historic financing conditions, the costs associated with acquiring investment properties are within reach of more consumers today than at any point in recent history. At the same time, rental rates are increasing and vacancy rates are dropping, sparked by the additional demand that comes with declines in homeownership. More renters in the market make the potential return on investment properties even more enticing.
BUSINESS
By J. Linn Allen and J. Linn Allen,Chicago Tribune | February 18, 1992
CHICAGO -- Coldwell Banker, one of the nation's three largest residential real estate firms, took a major step yesterday toward forcing home sellers to disclose defects that could affect the value of their property.The company became the first major nationwide firm to require sellers to fill out a written disclosure form for all listings obtained by its company-owned offices across the country. Disclosure forms will also be required for homes purchased by buyers working through those Coldwell Banker offices.
BUSINESS
By Denise Haddix-Niemiec and Denise Haddix-Niemiec,Los Angeles Daily News | October 14, 1990
George Elkins Co., a fixture in Los Angeles area real estate for nearly 70 years, is selling its residential operations to separate management-led investor groups, a company official said.The firm's three company-owned residential real estate offices are being sold to two investor groups.It then will expand its mortgage banking, property management and general insurance divisions, Ronald Robbins, president of George Elkins Co., said Tuesday.The prices of the separate deals were not disclosed.
NEWS
February 4, 1992
The contraction in homebuilding may have pushed the American Dream further out of reach for millions of potential buyers by choking off competition. Tougher credit policies following the savings and loan debacle have killed financing for many smaller builders, forcing them into bankruptcy. Whatever business exists is being handled by larger home builders, ultimately translating into less choice and higher prices for buyers. This poses profound implications not only for purchasers, but local economies inextricably linked to the ebb and flow of residential real estate.
BUSINESS
By Daniel Barkin and Daniel Barkin,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
O'Conor, Piper & Flynn, the largest locally owned residential real estate brokerage in Maryland, has been breaking company sales records all spring.In March, the records began to fall. In that month, OPF agents handled $235 million worth of home sales, more than any month in OPF's history. In April, OPF agents pushed that to $240 million, and in May, sales volume was $255 million. Chairman and CEO James P. O'Conor called March, April and May "bell ringers.""March was the best month ever," said O'Conor, "followed by April, which was the best month ever.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Mary Monica Skelton-Kerner, who sold residential real estate and was a hospital volunteer, died of heart disease Sunday at Sinai Hospital. She was 79 and lived in Bel Air. Born Mary Monica Skelton in Williamsport, Pa., she was the daughter of William Skelton, a Glenn L. Martin flight manual writer and engineer, and Mary Monica Skelton, a nurse. She lived in Overlea as a young woman and was a 1952 graduate of Kenwood High School, where she sang in the girl's chorus and the glee club and belonged to the Civil Air Patrol.
BUSINESS
By Jim Carlton and Jim Carlton,The Wall Street Journal | September 15, 1991
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Earlier this year, Re/Max International Inc. proudly announced that its local office had overtaken Coldwell Banker as this metropolitan market's top residential real estate broker. Coldwell denied it, and promptly accused Re/Max of using misleading figures.Considering the animosity Re/Max has generated in the residential real estate market in the past 18 years, Coldwell's response was relatively mild. Dennis Curtin, now Re/Max's Middle States regional manager, says he received threatening letters and phone calls when he brought the first Re/Max franchise to Kansas City.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 1, 2011
Helen Anna Ferrell, a retired real estate agent, died of lung cancer Dec. 20 at the Cockeysville home of her daughter. She was 80. Helen Anna Ena was born in Baltimore and spent her childhood in Highlandtown with her seven siblings. She graduated from the Catholic High School of Baltimore in 1947 and married Frank J. Ferrell in 1950. The couple, who celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in October, raised three children in Lutherville. Mrs. Ferrell obtained her real estate license in 1975, and specialized in residential real estate.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | August 28, 2007
Real estate investment trusts, most of which have little or nothing to do with the housing market and home mortgages, have taken a stock-price pummeling this summer as investors fled anything remotely connected to those out-of-favor industries. Columbia-based Corporate Office Properties Trust, for instance, builds high-security offices for government agencies and contractors and says business is steady. But its stock is down 27 percent since its peak of $56-a-share in February.
BUSINESS
By Trif Alatzas and Trif Alatzas,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
After spending two years as the economy's brightest star, housing sales are expected to fall this year. With mortgage rates near record lows and poised to rise, the real estate forecast is that sales have nowhere to go but down. Even so, most economists and real estate brokers in Maryland believe that the market will remain strong because the housing supply is so limited. There are more buyers than sellers and the phenomenon shows no signs of waning, given land-preservation concerns and an influx of Washington-area workers.
NEWS
July 15, 2000
NOTHING more dramatically underscores Baltimore's two-city existence -- one wealthy, the other destitute -- than the city's current dual residential real estate market. It's hard to find top-end properties for sale at any price in places like Roland Park, Homeland, Guilford, Mount Washington, Bolton Hill or Ten Hills. The same is true, of course, of anything close to the harbor. But that is only a small part of the story. With 4,890 residential properties appearing this week on the multiple list -- and dozens of additional houses being advertised directly by their owners -- the city has a glut of unsold homes.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
The Ryland Group Inc., on the heels of announcing plans to relocate its corporate headquarters to Southern California from Columbia, said yesterday that its third-quarter earnings and home sales shattered previous high-water marks.The homebuilder's net income of $18.1 million, or $1.21 per share, nearly doubled its results from the comparable quarter that ended Sept. 30 a year ago. The company's homebuilding pretax earnings of $35.4 million rose 41 percent compared with the third quarter of 1998.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1999
Jim Joyce, who helped put the Baltimore division of the Ryland Group Inc. back on steady ground, is being transferred to Phoenix in hopes of growing the Columbia-based company's presence in that thriving Southwestern market.Replacing Joyce as division president is Ed Gold, Ryland's senior vice president of human resources in its corporate office. Gold, 42, will assume control of the division next week. He lives in Pikesville and has been with Ryland since August 1996 after working five years as vice president of human resources for USF&G Corp.
NEWS
September 1, 1998
Rachel E. Feldstein, a Baltimore Realtor for nearly 50 years, died Sunday of cancer at her home in Harper House in Cross Keys. She was 86 and a former Mount Washington resident.At the time of her death, Mrs. Feldstein was associated with Prudential Carruthers in Timonium. In 1950, she established Feldstein Realty, specializing in residential real estate in Mount Washington and Northwest Baltimore. The business was merged into Michael Yerman & Co. in 1979.The former Rachel E. Ochstein was born and raised in Fort Wayne, Ind. She earned a bachelor's degree in nursing from Indiana University and a master's degree in nursing from the Johns Hopkins University.
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