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BUSINESS
November 7, 2004
A reader asks about the property disclosure requirements for the sale of residential real estate in Maryland. A Maryland statute requires the seller of single-family residential property to complete and deliver to each purchaser either a written residential property disclosure statement or a written residential property disclaimer statement. The law applies only to residential real property improved by four or fewer single-family units. The law does not apply to the initial sale of a single-family residence that has never been occupied or for which a certificate of occupancy has been issued within one year before the seller and purchaser entered into a contract.
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NEWS
August 21, 2014
I could not agree more with your editorial regarding the minor privilege tax ( "Minor privilege, major disincentive," Aug. 13). While the article was business focused, this absurd tax also hits the residential property owners in the city. A couple of months after purchasing a home in Baltimore City in 2012, I received a bill for a minor privilege tax. Being new to the city, I had no idea what this tax was. After a couple of phone calls I found out that I will be charged a $193.25 yearly fee for having a second floor bay window on my house and for a 5-inch piece of conduit that runs under the sidewalk in front of my house.
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NEWS
March 31, 1991
Trafalgar House Residential, Maryland, has begun building the first homes at Montgomery Meadows, a community of 112 luxury single-family homes off Route 103 in Ellicott City.Priced from the low $200,000s, the homes have three to four bedrooms and 2 1/2 baths. Features include 9-foot ceilings, large eat-in kitchens and family rooms with fireplaces. Master bedroom suites have vaulted ceilings.Trafalgar House is a United Kingdom-based international group engaged in commercial and residential property, construction and engineering, passenger shipping, hotels and cargo shipping.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
Kudos, once again, to Craig Witzke. I moved to Baltimore, 27 years ago, to start a distribution/construction business. By accident, I ended up living in Catonsville; it was the town at the end of I-70. I never regretted that decision. It is a wonderful community of which I am very proud to a member, even if I'm not really considered a Catonsvillian by some. I've never met anyone that cared for and did as much for Catonsville as Craig Witzke.  I am honored to have called him a friend for nearly 20 years.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
The House of Delegates overwhelmingly passed Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s proposed "flush tax" yesterday, but lawmakers in the Senate spent the afternoon rewriting the bill, leaving its future uncertain. Ehrlich had appeared well on his way to a solid environmental victory with a surprisingly strong 134-to-5 vote in the House on his proposal to add a surcharge to water bills. The money would pay to upgrade sewage systems and thus protect the Chesapeake Bay. Del. Maggie L. McIntosh, chairwoman of the Environmental Matters Committee, said she was surprised and pleased by the strong margin in support of the initiative.
NEWS
October 13, 1995
COMMISSIONER W. Benjamin Brown has provided us a new definition of "undesirable" -- a family with an income between $45,000 and $55,000 seeking to live in Carroll County. These objectionable people have the audacity to use more in public services than they would pay in property taxes, according to the first-term commissioner. He made the comment in response to a report by builders and others encouraging more affordable housing in Carroll.Since the county's median household income is about $48,000, more than half of the county's population must be considered a bunch of freeloaders by Mr. Brown's definition.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
Homeowners may soon pay higher property taxes because of the collapse of the commercial real estate market.As the value of office, industrial and retail buildings has fallen, the amount of taxes paid by owners of such properties hasshrunk. And owners of residential property will be forced to make up the difference, according to a report by the Urban Land Institute, a Washington-based real estate research group.The report foresees "a massive shift in the burden of paying for local government services from the commercial sector to the residential sector."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
County Executive Charles I. Ecker told the County Thursday to expect a $7 million to $9 million cut in state aid."What they take away from us this year we will not get back next year," Mr. Ecker told the council.Mr. Ecker and his financial advisers were briefing the council on what to expect later this month when Gov. William Donald Schaefer announces his plans for dealing with a $500 million deficit in the state budget."There is no golden goose over the horizon," budget director Raymond S. Wacks said.
NEWS
By Dan Harsha and Dan Harsha,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2003
More than a month after it rejected a measure that would have further limited tax increases for some homeowners, the Annapolis city council is asking the state to allow similar limits for commercial and rental properties. The resolution, cosponsored by Aldermen Josh Cohen and Cynthia Carter, passed 6-3 Monday night. Some council members said it was little more than a face-saving measure after the council voted down a popular ordinance that would have saved homeowners money in the face of rapidly increasing property assessments.
NEWS
By Dan Harsha and Dan Harsha,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2003
More than a month after it rejected a measure that would have further limited tax increases for some homeowners, the Annapolis city council is asking the state to allow similar limits for commercial and rental properties. The resolution, co-sponsored by Aldermen Josh Cohen and Cynthia Carter, passed, 6-3, Monday night. Some council members said it was little more than a face-saving measure after the council voted down a popular ordinance that would have saved homeowners money in the face of rapidly increasing property assessments.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Mary Monica Skelton-Kerner, who sold residential real estate and was a hospital volunteer, died of heart disease Sunday at Sinai Hospital. She was 79 and lived in Bel Air. Born Mary Monica Skelton in Williamsport, Pa., she was the daughter of William Skelton, a Glenn L. Martin flight manual writer and engineer, and Mary Monica Skelton, a nurse. She lived in Overlea as a young woman and was a 1952 graduate of Kenwood High School, where she sang in the girl's chorus and the glee club and belonged to the Civil Air Patrol.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
The Maryland Tax Court has frequently failed to rule on residential property assessment cases as promptly as the law requires, according to a state audit made public Thursday. The court, which hears appeals in cases involving state and local taxes, must hear and decide residential property assessment cases within 90 days. But 41 percent of the cases heard between July 2010 and mid-February took longer - as much as a year past the 90-day point, the Office of Legislative Audits said.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | May 9, 2013
The unpleasant stuff has all flowed downhill from the federal, to the state, to the county. A stormwater management fee, or rain tax, if you prefer, has been signed into law by Harford County Executive David R. Craig. There has been plenty of opportunity for complaining about passing the buck, failing to protect the Chesapeake Bay and blaming the other political party. Now for the reality: Harford County has taken a reasonable approach in its move to collect $12.50 a year from the owner of each residential property and study the issue to see if that's enough to deal with treating filth-laden stormwater runoff before it gets to the bay. Maybe it is, and maybe it isn't, but it's not a ridiculous amount considering it will bring in a lot of money for water quality improvement programs that aren't funded.
NEWS
By John Culleton | December 16, 2012
Some years back, Carroll County Republicans, lacking serious competition from the county's Democratic Party, divided into what I consider two factions — a pro-growth group and the slow-growth group. The pro-growth faction dominated the legislative delegation, while the slow-growthers dominated the Board of County Commissioners. But the pro-growthers dominated the primary process. So to break up the monopoly of the slow-growthers in county government, they pushed through the five commissioner system, and created a district map that made it difficult for the incumbent commissioners at the time to win. Many of those who voted for five commissioners thought that they would have the opportunity to vote for all five.
EXPLORE
November 15, 2012
Last week's article, "Board approves zoning district, despite objections" (Nov. 8), lacked key information. Council Bill 36 would authorize a new Community Enhancement Floating (CEF) overlay district which removes all limits on density, maximum building heights, minimum setbacks, etc. It can be approved by the Zoning Board at any time. Once approved there is almost no basis for any citizen opposition since CEF allows almost anything. Under similar zoning in Baltimore County, a neighborhood-breaking seven-story office building with tiny setbacks and large continuously lit signage across from residential property is being proposed.
EXPLORE
September 10, 2012
This is a great nation and I'm proud to be an American. This country affords us numerous freedoms and quality of life. As a good American, I pay my taxes and bills, give to charities and help others who are less fortunate. My mother, school teachers and those I've come to admire and trust throughout my life have taught me, among other things, to respect others and the value of following rules. Rules are essential in society to prevent chaos and protect the common people. I follow the rules and expect others to do the same.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- Senior citizens deserve to have their property taxes capped, Del. Richard N. Dixon told a House subcommittee yesterday."These are people who have made a contribution to our society," the Carroll Democrat told the Ways and Means Committee's Housing and Social Issues Subcommittee.At the request of a 74-year-old Woodbine resident, Mr. Dixon introduced a bill that would freeze property tax assessments for homeowners 65 and older. The resident, Charles E. Scott of the 2800 block of Gillis Falls Road, said that he and other senior citizens find it difficult to afford yearly increases in property taxes.
NEWS
By John Culleton | December 16, 2012
Some years back, Carroll County Republicans, lacking serious competition from the county's Democratic Party, divided into what I consider two factions — a pro-growth group and the slow-growth group. The pro-growth faction dominated the legislative delegation, while the slow-growthers dominated the Board of County Commissioners. But the pro-growthers dominated the primary process. So to break up the monopoly of the slow-growthers in county government, they pushed through the five commissioner system, and created a district map that made it difficult for the incumbent commissioners at the time to win. Many of those who voted for five commissioners thought that they would have the opportunity to vote for all five.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
The Gallaghers still miss Betty White and wistfully recall how much the Silkie loved to be held. The hen, who was named after the 90-year-old celebrity because she was "ditsy and really out there" like many of the actress' TV characters, was killed by a fox last fall in the Glenelg family's backyard. "We normally don't name our chickens so we don't become too attached," said Karinna Gallagher, an IBM employee who works from home and who witnessed the attack but couldn't stop it. "But Betty White was such a flighty bird who didn't care about the pecking order.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
The Howard County Council is considering this month a bill to authorize property tax credits for homeowners whose property meets environmental design standards, a measure that would make the county one of the few local governments to give such breaks. Under the bill, owners of newly built homes that meet the "silver" standard in Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED certification, awarded by the U.S. Green Building Council, could receive up to a 25 percent discount on their county property tax bill, while homes with the highest LEED rating could earn a 75 percent discount the first year.
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