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Residential Program

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NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Liz Atwood and Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writers | April 12, 1994
A residential treatment program for addicted mothers was delayed at least a year by the Annapolis City Council last night -- even though the members included $173,000 for the project in its five-year spending plan.A majority on the council voted to delay the funding so that public hearings could be held on whether the residential center should be housed in a community recreation facility."Why have more drugs brought into a community when you're trying to get the drugs out of the community?"
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EXPLORE
August 4, 2012
Target Community and Educational Services Inc., based in Westminster, recently welcomed eight McDaniel College graduate students who are serving a two-year internship as community living managers in Target's residential program. The students are working to complete a master's degree in human services management in special education at McDaniel. During their internships, each will live in one of Target's homes or in the apartment program that provides 24/7 supervision and support to individuals with intellectual and development disabilities.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
The Harford Glen Environmental Education Center near Bel Air is the school system's crown jewel in outdoor learning.Nature trails, ponds and birds abound in the 350-acre park, owned by the Board of Education, on South Wheel Road.The pastoral oasis, amid the county sprawl, also is the site of a weeklong, residential program for the county's fifth-grade students, providing them with a camp-like learning experience.But not all parents want their children to spend the night at the center."I was told it was to build independence.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Greg Garland and Gadi Dechter and Greg Garland,sun reporters | February 24, 2007
A month after a youth died while being restrained at the Bowling Brook Preparatory School, authorities have not determined what caused his death or whether any laws were broken in the way the juvenile facility's staff handled him. Though investigators say dozens of people have been interviewed, key student eyewitnesses to Isaiah Simmons' death have not been contacted by the Carroll County Sheriff's Office since the youths were removed from the residential program,...
EXPLORE
August 4, 2012
Target Community and Educational Services Inc., based in Westminster, recently welcomed eight McDaniel College graduate students who are serving a two-year internship as community living managers in Target's residential program. The students are working to complete a master's degree in human services management in special education at McDaniel. During their internships, each will live in one of Target's homes or in the apartment program that provides 24/7 supervision and support to individuals with intellectual and development disabilities.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | November 20, 1994
The Harford County school board has voted to leave the controversial Harford Glen residential environmental program intact, but it is giving parents the right to choose an option.Shirley Doud of Jarrettsville, who objected to the overnight program, said "it's wonderful. Both sides kind of worked together."The Harford Glen controversy had been brewing for almost two years, since a group of parents opposed their children spending the night during the five-day program for fifth-grade students.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 2001
An Annapolis man who once served eight years in prison for what federal judges ruled was an unfair conviction in a near-fatal beating pleaded guilty yesterday to an unrelated drug charge. Brady George Spicer, 44, was convicted of heroin possession. Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Clayton Greene Jr. sentenced him to 18 months in jail, where he is serving a year on a misdemeanor theft conviction. Spicer had been convicted of assault with intent to murder in the 1990 beating of Francis "Bones" Denvir, a popular Annapolis restaurateur.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | July 24, 1991
They agreed about one thing -- the Carroll County Association for Retarded Citizens needs more money.But a group of parents and the agency's board of directors differed on whether a registered nurse position should have been cut to balance the budget.The board voted unanimously last night to support an earlier decision by Executive Director Timothy Atkinson to cut the coordinator ofhealth services. Atkinson had asked the board to discuss the matter after the families of about eight clients complained that the position was needed.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1996
Youth Services International Inc. said it has been licensed to expand a residential program for delinquent youth in South Dakota, adding 24 beds to bring the facility's capacity to 108.The Owings Mills company said the extra beds mean about another $700,000 of annual revenue for the fast-growing operator of educational and behavioral-change programs aimed at juveniles.The new beds will be at Springfield Academy in Springfield, S.D., where students range in ages from 14 to 18. The average student stays in the program for about one year.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1997
Youth Services International Inc. of Owings Mills has been chosen by the state of Florida to run a residential program for juveniles in Daytona Beach, the company said yesterday.Youth Services is to take over the contract today for the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice to manage the 30-bed Timberline Youth Center, an academy for young women serving sentences of nine to 12 months.Timberline is the third troubled facility that Florida has asked Youth Services to take over.The company will hire an executive director and staff to operate an accredited school that offers treatment programs, athletics and vocational skills.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2005
Jake Hughes is a shade taller than the kids in his class, but his interests are typical of a fourth-grader. The Edgewood youth plays football, lacrosse and baseball. He plays drums and loves to read. What distinguishes the 9-year-old from his peers surfaced long ago: Jake recognized all the letters of the alphabet by age 2. He was reading in preschool. Early on in first grade, he was reading chapter books and doing advanced math. Although Jake has never taken a formal IQ test, he has excelled academically.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
Several state legislators and the Baltimore County executive questioned yesterday the Ehrlich administration's surprise plan to close the troubled Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, saying the move poses a potential threat to public safety if the youths are sent home or moved into less-restrictive group homes. "They have no plan whatsoever for what's going to happen to these kids," said Del. Bobby A. Zirkin, a Baltimore County Democrat. Zirkin commented after a briefing for the House Appropriations Committee in Annapolis yesterday on the administration's plans to shut down most of the Baltimore County facility by Nov. 30. The portion of the school being closed is a 130-bed long-term residential program for youths who have been committed by the courts.
NEWS
By Audrey Goldberg and Audrey Goldberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 2004
Arthur Gold was on the New Jersey Turnpike headed to take his mother-in-law to an appointment when his cell phone rang. "I got the call, and I heard screaming [in the background]," Gold said. "I had to ask who it was." The caller was Carol Beatty, executive director of the Arc of Howard County. And she had some good news: Gold had won the organization's raffle for a new Porsche in a drawing that morning. "I think they thought I was going to crash," said Gold, remembering the conversation he had last month with Beatty.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2003
As founder and executive director of Our House, Richard Bienvenue's recipe for running his residential program for troubled youths is relatively simple: Take some at-risk kids, teach them a trade, help them earn their high school diploma and all but guarantee them a job upon completion. What society gets as a result are some useful and productive young citizens. "Our goals for them are to become taxpaying, upright citizens," he said, noting that the recidivism rate for youths in the 18-month program is 19 percent.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2003
As founder and executive director of Our House, Richard Bienvenue's recipe for running his residential program for troubled youths is relatively simple: Take some at-risk kids, teach them a trade, help them earn their high school diploma and all but guarantee them a job upon completion. What society gets as a result are some useful and productive young citizens. "Our goals for them are to become taxpaying, upright citizens," he said, noting that the recidivism rate for youths in the 18-month program is 19 percent.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 2001
An Annapolis man who once served eight years in prison for what federal judges ruled was an unfair conviction in a near-fatal beating pleaded guilty yesterday to an unrelated drug charge. Brady George Spicer, 44, was convicted of heroin possession. Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Clayton Greene Jr. sentenced him to 18 months in jail, where he is serving a year on a misdemeanor theft conviction. Spicer had been convicted of assault with intent to murder in the 1990 beating of Francis "Bones" Denvir, a popular Annapolis restaurateur.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | May 3, 1992
The family of a mentally retarded Columbia man claims that state and county social services officials have violated the ruling of an administrative judge, state law and the man's constitutional rights by failing to place him in a supervised residential home.In a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Howard County Circuit Court, Mary and Vincent Finan of the 9200 block of Bellfall Court, allege that their son, Dennis J. Finan, 28, has deteriorated significantly since the Howard County Department of Social Services decided that he could not return to a group home in Columbia where he was formerly a resident.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
Several state legislators and the Baltimore County executive questioned yesterday the Ehrlich administration's surprise plan to close the troubled Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, saying the move poses a potential threat to public safety if the youths are sent home or moved into less-restrictive group homes. "They have no plan whatsoever for what's going to happen to these kids," said Del. Bobby A. Zirkin, a Baltimore County Democrat. Zirkin commented after a briefing for the House Appropriations Committee in Annapolis yesterday on the administration's plans to shut down most of the Baltimore County facility by Nov. 30. The portion of the school being closed is a 130-bed long-term residential program for youths who have been committed by the courts.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
The group that owns the former Navy hospital ship Sanctuary sued the state yesterday over its failure to find a permanent Baltimore berth where the ship can be used to help women drug abusers.Project Life filed the suit in Baltimore Circuit Court against Gov. .. Parris N. Glendening and other state officials. It charged the state was violating federal laws by refusing to accommodate the ship at a state pier.The nonprofit organization plans a residential program for women consisting of "addiction intervention" and "lifestyle education."
BUSINESS
November 25, 1997
Youth Services International Inc. of Owings Mills has been chosen by the state of Florida to run a residential program for juveniles in Daytona Beach, the company said yesterday.Youth Services is to take over the contract today for the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice to manage the 30-bed Timberline Youth Center, an academy for young women serving sentences of nine to 12 months.Timberline is the third troubled facility that Florida has asked Youth Services to take over.The company will hire an executive director and staff to operate an accredited school that offers treatment programs, athletics and vocational skills.
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