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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
A man was shot and killed Tuesday night in Baltimore's West Forest Park neighborhood, as killings in the city's Northwest District approached the total for all of last year. While the Park Heights area in the northern portion has long been a troubled area, half the killings in the district this year have occurred in the southern area, where there is lower crime and neighborhoods consist mainly of single-family homes with well-kept lawns. Maj. Johnny Delgado, the district commander, said he thinks police enforcement efforts in the northern part of the district have led criminals to venture southward.
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NEWS
By Fred Medinger | January 13, 2014
I write to ask the governor and General Assembly to help with a growing problem in Baltimore County and elsewhere in Maryland, namely the year-round practice of detonating loud firecrackers and launching incendiary fireworks among homes in residential communities. I live north of Parkton. Throughout the year I hear explosions and what sounds like gunfire coming from the grounds of a nearby school and surrounding communities. This occurs at dusk on most summer weekends, and day or night at other times during the year, on weekdays as well as weekends.
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NEWS
June 9, 1997
THE CLOCK IS ticking. What will happen to Memorial Stadium after the Ravens move to Camden Yards next year?This is a momentous question. The Ednor Gardens and Lakeside areas have always had a stadium as their neighbor. If not Memorial Stadium, constructed in 1954, then its predecessor, Baltimore Municipal Stadium. It was built in 1922 -- before most of the current residential area was even developed.In 1988, when it became apparent a new ball park would be built for the Orioles, the city embarked on a planning process for Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 19, 2013
The corner of North and Charles promises to be full of Artscape visitors this weekend, but how many of them will realize there is a thriving and changing residential community within and behind those commercial blocks? This might be Baltimore's fastest-growing arts residential neighborhood, not just its arts presentation and performance address. But unlike the creative stands strung out along Charles Street this weekend, the results of a lot of residential investment and hard work are not so evident.
NEWS
October 26, 1990
A court ruling to remove billboards from certain neighborhoods in Baltimore appears to reflect most people's opinions about the signs, especially those advertising alcohol and tobacco, according to Evening Sun readers and other callers to SUNDIAL.Of 377 respondents, 230 said alcohol and tobacco should not be advertised on billboards, while 147 said it was OK to advertise alcohol and tobacco on billboards.Of 363 callers, 235 said alcohol and tobacco ads should be banned from billboards in residential neighborhoods, while 128 said the signs should not be banned from residential neighborhoods.
NEWS
November 26, 1990
Given the fact that billboards pushing alcohol and cigarettes have stood in city residential neighborhoods for decades, no great harm is done by allowing them to remain for a few months longer until the Special Court of Appeals hears the appeal of Boisclair Advertising.Still, it is a disappointment to community groups, which charge that such advertising preys on the poor and who thought they had made progress last October in Circuit Court. Boisclair has about 900 billboards in residential neighborhoods where, according to zoning regulations, they are not permitted.
NEWS
October 3, 1999
MOTORISTS speeding through quiet residential neighborhoods have become one of the major annoyances of modern life.It's the reason Howard County planners want developers to design narrower roads, why residents in Eldersburg are demanding "traffic-calming" speed bumps near their homes and why Baltimoreans are petitioning to have streets made one-way or blocked entirely.This is a quality-of-life issue, but it is also more serious than that.Being a pedestrian in Maryland has become perilous.Last year, 93 pedestrians were killed on the state's roads, averaging one death nearly every four days.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
The County Council voted last night to allow gunsmiths who specialize in cleaning and repairing weapons to work from their homes.However, the bill which lawmakers approved unanimously would not allow gunsmiths to manufacture or sell guns in residential neighborhoods.Bills that would govern the location of cellular telephone and communications towers within the county, appropriate $200,000 to replace street signs and allow charities and civic groups to stage casino-style gambling events were pending before the council late last night.
NEWS
May 23, 1994
Land use in Ward One will be the topic of tonight's hearing before the Annapolis City Council.Six pieces of legislation regulating bed and breakfast homes, restaurants, professional offices and housing will be discussed. The hearing begins at 7:30 p.m. at City Hall.The legislation would create three conservation districts -- one for residences, one for businesses and one for professional offices. The residential zone would target nine neighborhoods considered to be at risk because of heavy traffic, maintenance problems and nonconforming uses of land.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1999
The Baltimore County Planning Board is considering making it easier to set up day care centers in residential neighborhoods.But it might be a while.In a move involving an issue that has struck a nerve with community activists, the board has decided it needs additional information before it opens the door to more day care centers in residential neighborhoods.The board decision Thursdaycame after Planning Director Arnold F. "Pat" Keller told board members that day care in residential neighborhoods -- the subject of a 22-page planning report calling for relaxed restrictions -- needs more study.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
A man was shot and killed Tuesday night in Baltimore's West Forest Park neighborhood, as killings in the city's Northwest District approached the total for all of last year. While the Park Heights area in the northern portion has long been a troubled area, half the killings in the district this year have occurred in the southern area, where there is lower crime and neighborhoods consist mainly of single-family homes with well-kept lawns. Maj. Johnny Delgado, the district commander, said he thinks police enforcement efforts in the northern part of the district have led criminals to venture southward.
NEWS
June 18, 2012
The dozens of liquor stores located in Baltimore's residential neighborhoods are unquestionably harmful to the city. Besides being a drag on property values and in many cases a contributor to blight, these stores, grandfathered in under older, looser zoning regulations, are a threat to public health. Not only is their presence associated with the medical problems of alcohol abuse but Johns Hopkins researchers have also found a link between these stores and increased violent crime. Baltimore health and planning officials are well justified in making their reduction or elimination a top goal.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 30, 2010
As the Baltimore County Council prepares to consider new regulations for wind turbines in residential neighborhoods, at least one member is strongly opposed to the idea. The Planning Board voted unanimously recently to recommend allowing one wind turbine no taller than 60 feet per one-acre property. The recommendation - which came in response to a council request for new regulations - would set rules for residential areas only. The Planning Board said it did not intend to limit the prospects for wind energy in industrial and commercial zones.
NEWS
By Joseph T. "Jody" Landers III | May 8, 2009
It's time to put up a fight. Baltimore is right to defend its existing zoning code against a Department of Justice lawsuit concerning the placement of group homes in residential neighborhoods. The suit, filed last week in the U.S. District Court, seeks an unspecified amount of money for three organizations and seeks to compel the city to allow residential treatment facilities housing up to eight addicts in any neighborhood. It would invalidate sections of the city zoning code that require City Council approval for the placement of such facilities.
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | January 1, 2006
In an effort to disrupt drug dealing outside of corner convenience stores operating in residential neighborhoods, a Baltimore councilwoman is pushing for legislation that would give police the authority to temporarily close such businesses. If Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke's bill is approved, Baltimore police would be armed with a power once enacted during some of the city's worst years of drug violence in the early 1990s. While some council members express concern about punishing business owners for activities of people congregating outside their stores, most side with Clarke and community leaders who say temporary curfews might stem the foot traffic fueling the drug trade in many neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2003
A team of urban designers unveiled a plan yesterday for a town center in Randallstown that they say would integrate the community's strong residential neighborhoods, natural features and history while mitigating the heavy traffic, commercial development and lack of identity that have afflicted the area for years. The product of work by the second Urban Design Assistance Team to visit Baltimore County in two years, the plan calls for the gradual transformation of aging shopping centers and apartment complexes around the intersection of Liberty and Old Court roads into an area combining high-density residential property, new commercial development, offices and a number of civic spaces, such as a community college branch, a YMCA and a theater.
NEWS
June 30, 2000
AGING HOUSES on Crofton's main roads that aren't very attractive to homebuyers could become the sites of start-up and small businesses if the Anne Arundel County Council passes a proposed business development bill. Under the legislation introduced by Councilman John J. Klocko III of Crofton, the modest family homes could more easily be converted to such uses as day care centers, beauty salons, florist shops and doctor's offices. Doctors, dentists and other small businesses can operate in residential neighborhoods, but they need special exceptions and existing zoning regulations limit the uses.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | October 25, 1990
The Schmoke administration scored a win yesterday in its fight to remove illegal billboards from Baltimore neighborhoods when a city judge ordered an advertising company to take down the signs within 60 days.Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan also ruled that Boisclair Advertising Inc. must pay for removing the signs, many of which advertise alcohol and cigarettes and are in poor, black neighborhoods.Boisclair's lawyers said yesterday that the company will challenge the ruling.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 28, 2003
IN rain-splattered Randallstown yesterday, they joined voices to trumpet a bright new day of art and culture, and bicycle paths and pedestrian bridges, and theaters and playing fields. That day will take a few years to arrive, but so what? In Randallstown, it can feel like years just crossing from one side of cluttered Liberty Road to the other. This northwest corridor of Baltimore County is a collage of green and leafy residential neighborhoods divided by a kind of Berlin Wall of gas stations and fast-food joints, bail bond operations and liquor stores, and traffic that coughs and wheezes and sputters at its center.
NEWS
By Michelle Pasternack | May 29, 2002
CONVENTIONAL WISDOM holds that educational institutions benefit the city at large to an extent that justifies inconvenience to individual neighborhoods or small groups of people. But is this always true? Can institutional expansion plans threaten harm to neighborhoods that will make them less attractive, more likely to lose both population and tax base? Take, for example, the sports complex that Loyola College proposes to build in Woodberry Forest. Woodberry, adjacent to Hampden, is poised for a residential resurgence.
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