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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2003
While the nation is struggling with a sagging economy, Carroll County is holding up "remarkably well," according to an economist who delivered an outlook on 2003 to business, government and community leaders yesterday in Westminster. Residential growth, which many in the county wish to stem, could insulate the area from the brunt of the downturn, said Anirban Basu, director of applied economics for Towson University's economic research arm, RESI Research & Consulting. Basu told an audience of about 200 that housing construction is strong throughout the state, particularly in Carroll.
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By John Culleton | September 8, 2012
It's a common refrain, and sometimes uttered for various reasons: We need to continue to control residential growth in Carroll County. My reason? New residences attract growing families - and growing families burden our school system. It is stated in the press, and even in the school system, that our school population is shrinking. That may be, countywide, but in my view the situation would have more gravity if I did not see portable classrooms still parked at most of the schools in the southern part of Carroll County.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
Commercial and industrial development has increased in Howard County, while residential growth may be slowing, according to a new report hailed as good news by County Executive James N. Robey.State figures show that nearly 7,000 jobs were created in the county in the 12 months since June 1997, more than twice the number predicted in the 1990 General Plan. And more nonresidential building permits were issued last year than in any year since 1992, the report says.The pressure of residential development may be easing, the report indicates.
EXPLORE
November 28, 2011
Maryland's got a very painful leg cramp, and needs some medicine to fix it. This sort of cramp is called "growth," the medication is called PlanMaryland, and we need to take it now. Growth is something every state, municipality and community has to deal with. It can be a painful throbbing like a leg cramp that wakes you in the middle of the night. You get up to walk it off, but sometimes it only gets worse. Maryland has the good fortune - although some would call it a malady - of being a desirable place to live and locate a business.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
The mayors of Hampstead, Manchester and Sykesville have joined the growing list of concerned residents and officials asking Gov. Parris N. Glendening to veto a controversial land-use bill.In a May 3 letter to the governor, the mayors said Senate Bill 649 would have a severe impact on their communities, where "infrastructure is strained by the recent amount of residential growth."Said Manchester Mayor Elmer C. Lippy Jr., "This bill is chaotic in terms of land use. The letter will at least put the germ of the veto idea in the governor's mind."
NEWS
June 22, 1999
IT IS well-accepted that Carroll County needs more business and industrial development to balance its tax base, more than 85 percent of which is residential. That's a primary county objective, and it should also be a goal for the incorporated municipalities.Unfortunately, the town of Sykesville is sending contrary signals in recent zoning decisions, promoting residential growth to the detriment of business.Last week, it affirmed rezoning of the 32-acre Raincliffe property from industrial to residential, allowing construction of 158 homes.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1996
A growth-management expert is calling for a 20-month ban on approving new building permits to give the county time to rework its master plan and get control of residential growth that has nearly tripled Carroll's population in 30 years.Robert H. Freilich, law professor at the University of Missouri and chairman of the planning and law division of the American Planning Institute, laid out the proposal for county and municipal officials in a two-day seminar in Westminster Thursday and Friday.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | November 20, 2007
Maryland officials outlined yesterday a smorgasbord of initiatives intended to smooth the way for an influx in the next few years of thousands of high-tech defense workers and their families. The plan, the product of nearly six months of meetings between state and local officials, calls for a variety of moves to steer at least some of the expected business and residential growth into Baltimore City and other communities near the expanding bases, particularly Aberdeen Proving Ground and Fort Meade.
NEWS
By JAMES M. CORAM and JAMES M. CORAM,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
The County Commissioners proposed a growth control bill yesterday that would limit residential development to an average of 1,000 units a year and confine it to areas where schools, roads and public services are deemed adequate to support it.The bill, which some developers say could cripple the homebuilding industry in Carroll, requires the commissioners to determine annually which parts of the county can handle residential growth.The commissioners would decide the number of building permits to be issued -- no more than 6,000 in a six-year period, including those issued in Carroll's eight municipalities.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2004
Winnie Stickles had time only to run to the country store next door and grab a sandwich and some chips between appointments at her Parkton hair salon, a place she says just keeps getting busier. In her lifetime, things have changed in this community, not so much a town as a crossroads with a few shops and a church a half-dozen miles from the Pennsylvania line in northern Baltimore County. Once-uninterrupted vistas of farmland are now studded with subdivisions of half-million-dollar homes.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | November 20, 2007
Maryland officials outlined yesterday a smorgasbord of initiatives intended to smooth the way for an influx in the next few years of thousands of high-tech defense workers and their families. The plan, the product of nearly six months of meetings between state and local officials, calls for a variety of moves to steer at least some of the expected business and residential growth into Baltimore City and other communities near the expanding bases, particularly Aberdeen Proving Ground and Fort Meade.
NEWS
October 1, 2006
In Carroll County, the race for county commissioner slots is usually decided in the Republican primary. But this year might be different. The usual bitter fight between the pro-growth and slow-growth Republican factions was won convincingly by the slow growth group in the 2004 primary. This time the well-heeled pro-growthers managed to land a slot on the Republican ticket for attorney Michael Zimmer. Unfortunately for his candidacy, Mr. Zimmer, who has no record of public service, was reprimanded by the Grievance Committee of the Maryland State Bar in 2003.
NEWS
September 3, 2006
Backing program of slow growth Since 1992, it has been my honor to represent the citizens of Carroll County as an elected member of the Board of Education. During that time, student enrollment grew more than 30 percent (from 21,641 full-time equivalent in 1992 to 28,194 in 2005). To accommodate the additional students, 12 new schools were constructed (Gateway School, six elementary, three middle, and two high schools) and six schools were modernized. The total construction costs of these schools exceeded $210 million.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | March 4, 2006
An unusual political rift among Republicans in Carroll County has spilled over into the State House and is threatening to stall the reorganization of the local government approved by voters and impede the county's budget process. Three times in the past few weeks, the county's three commissioners went to Annapolis to testify against bills proposed by Carroll's legislative delegation -- an extraordinary sign of disunity in Annapolis, where politicians from the same regions typically form a united front to secure their share of the state budget.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
Howard County residents sitting in traffic jams and eyeing new homes might believe that development is running rampant, but the facts say otherwise, according to Marsha S. McLaughlin, the planning director. "We think development is actually pretty well-phased. It is a challenge to convey that to citizens," McLaughlin told County Council members this week - including council Chairman Christopher J. Merdon, an Ellicott City Republican, and west Columbia Democrat Ken Ulman, both candidates for county executive.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2005
Few would argue that economic development along lower West Street, at least two decades in the making, is flourishing along this increasingly inhabited stretch of Annapolis. But the scale of new development - and its location - has residents worried about newcomers putting additional strain on traffic and parking. They also are concerned that the height of new buildings - such as at the $300 million Park Place complex under construction - will detract from the historic look of some communities.
NEWS
By DONALD DELL | October 23, 1994
The candidates for Carroll County commissioner on the Nov. 8 ballot, Republicans Donald I. Dell, Richard T. Yates and W. Benjamin Brown, and Democrats Elmer C. Lippy, Rebecca A. Orenstein and Grover N. "Sam" Sensabaugh, were asked to respond to the following questions: What existing measures will you use to control Carroll County's residential growth? What new measures are needed? Their responses appear below:I support effective controls on residential growth including the following measures:* Master plan (Both in the county and within Carroll's municipalities)
NEWS
September 25, 2005
THE ISSUE: The Carroll County commissioners will ask the county legislative delegation to propose a bill that would allow small-time gambling at the five senior centers. The ordinance would allow small amounts to be bet daily on bingo, cards and billiards. Do you think the legislators should sponsor the bill in the 2006 General Assembly session?Gambling bill should cover centers, more Gambling bill should cover centers, more Finally, the Carroll County commissioners have tackled a major problem: gambling by seniors.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2005
A report shows that Carroll County could legally double the fees it charges for building a new single-family home and add nearly $4,000 to the cost of a new townhouse. According to the draft Impact Fee Study and Analysis, delivered to the county commissioners yesterday, the maximum justifiable amount for a new detached house could be $13,745. The fee is now $6,836. The buyer of a new townhouse pays a $7,610 impact fee today, but that charge could rise to $11,510. Impact fees pay for additional classrooms needed because of residential growth, and for parks and recreational services.
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